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Nickel Plated 1911 info please

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by jcramin, Nov 8, 2006.

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  1. jcramin

    jcramin Member

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    My father has a Nickel Plated 1911 with wood grips S/N 49XXX, It has Model of 1911 U.S. Army on the right side and on the left side of the frame it says United States Property. It has t he Major Walter G. Penfield stamped on the left side frame, it also has a horse holding a sword stamped on the left side up near the top. Also on the left side it has the Patented information and Colts name and address. The gun is in flawless condition and works and fires flawlessly This gun looks near 100%. It does not have any arsenal rebuild markings.

    My father brought it back from WWII in this condition.

    I dont have any pics yet, but I will get some. The gun will NEVER be for sale, My dad will give it to me and one day I will give it to my son.

    Without pics, can anyone give me an idea of its value and any more info about it ???

    Thanks,
    J
     
  2. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Sounds like you have a US Government issue Colt Model of 1911 made in 1913.

    The "horse with a sword" is actually the famous Colt Pony, deflecting a spear.

    The Model of 1911 was made until 1927, at which point some slight modifications were introduced, and the gun was then designated as the Model of 1911-A1.
    Since there was no major difference between the two, the military retained the older guns in inventory, and re-issued them in WWII, Korea, and up through Vietnam.

    Unless your father was Major Walter G. Penfield, there's probably an interesting story as to how your father came to be in possession of his gun.
    The US military DID NOT allow individuals to personalize GI issue firearms this way.

    These US Government issued gun were never nickel plated while in service, but this was a popular modification done to souvenir pistols after the war.
    The nickel plating reduces the value of the gun rather drastically, since it's no longer in original condition.

    As a family heirloom this matters not at all.
     
  3. jcramin

    jcramin Member

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    This was brought back from WWII as is with nickel plating. It was an officers pistol. I know of one other pistol like this that also belonged to an officer and was a nickel plater 1911 used in WWII and was also an officers pistol.

    J
     
  4. jcramin

    jcramin Member

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    So this was probably a gun that was used in the war but was nickel plated probably shortly after the war and was hardly ever shot, if at all since it is in flawless condition.

    I will get some pics as soon as I can

    J
     
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