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Non-reloaders... read

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Kitt, Nov 25, 2003.

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  1. Zach S

    Zach S Member

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    I'd like to get into reloading, but lack the time and space at the moment.
    At $13/50rds of .45 (or, more commonly, $20/100rds), I'd really like to get in to it.
     
  2. JohnK

    JohnK Member

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    Since no one else has asked yet, where have you been hearing that? I haven't seen that on THR or TFL or any other gun related board. Was it the guy trying to sell you ammo telling those stories?
     
  3. Monkeyleg

    Monkeyleg Member.

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    I have approximately 15,000 reloads though just one of my .45's. At $6 per 100 rounds, that's $900. If I'd bought Speer Lawman or Federal ammo at $13 per 50 rounds, the cost would have been $3900. Plus, neither the Speer nor the Federal would give me 1" to 1 1/2" groups at 25 yards. Once I got a load dialed in, that's the only load I've used.

    Plus, I can reload for rifles and get accuracy that no factory ammo will produce.

    Also, given that my wife works 2nd shift, reloading gives me something to do at night.

    Now, if only I could get the time during the day to shoot what I've loaded. :(
     
  4. XavierBreath

    XavierBreath Member

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    I always figured I'd spend just as much but get to shoot a bit more.
     
  5. SnWnMe

    SnWnMe Member

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    Here's what I learned: Despite what many folks would say DO NOT get a single stage especially if you consider yourself a mid to high volume handgun shooter. There is nothing complicated about a progressive reloader. "Too many things going on" my eye. If you can drive and watch your dashboard instruments at the same time, you can use a prog.

    A prog IMO is even safer than a single stage in preventing a double charge. The only rule is: Don't short stroke the lever. Compare to: An array of 50 shells arranged 5X10 in a loading tray that you place powder in one a time, your S.O. or something distracts you. You come back to your work and...Hmm.. where was I?

    Also, if you decide to go prog, get as many stations as you can afford. I have a Lee Pro 1000, it has three stations. I ended up buying a Lee single stage for the crimping operation. Get at least 4 stations. The Lee Loader is a good deal. The folks in their HQ are very knowledgeable and very courteous. They helped me with all my questions. Also the internet gives you easy access to information in case you do get stumped by your prog. Plenty of knowledgeable folks back in the Reloading board of THR.

    I don't use auto case feed and auto bullet feed, I check each piece of brass before it goes into the cycle and I check the case under the seating station to verify that it does have powder in it. I can still crank out about 90-100 rds in 30 minutes!

    Benchrest/target/precision/small volume shooters should probably get a single stage.
     
  6. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    "Rockchucker, no. Not that there's anything wrong with it It's just not necessary nor best for an FNG. It's too slow to use as well."

    :scrutiny: :confused:

    I reloaded many thousands of rounds on a RockChucker... The one my father brought home from the office... Both rifle and handgun...

    It's no faster, but certainly NO slower than any C-press I've ever used, and I've used them all.

    It's all in technique.
     
  7. Majic

    Majic Member

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    I suggest a Rockchucker press because a handgun shooter may venture out into the world of rifle shooting also. He or she may go into wildcatting or case forming . The strong single stage press allows this flexibility. If high volume is required then the addition of a Piggyback unit converts the Rockchucker to a progressive press. You can live and operate in both worlds with just one press. Just one thing to consider if one day in the future you look at your bench and see 2 presses, powder measure, and possibly a bullet sizer mounted and space then becomes a premium.
    If working up absolute maximum load for a particular firearm then weighing each powder charge is required. Then using a progressive press becomes a slow pain. They both have advantages and disadvantages. Plan not only for today, but look to the future also and buy equipment that can cover many bases.
     
  8. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

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    Another vote for a Rock Chucker.

    It'll last you forever.

    If you ever decide to quit reloading there will always be someone wanting to buy it.

    No matter how advanced you become you will always need a single stage press for some low volume simple operation.

    If you want to make just 10 or 15 experimental rounds you can do it faster on a single stage that you can by resetting a progressive.

    If you want to assemble uber-consistent match-type loads, a single stage is what you need. Along with a good scale and powder trickler.
    (see correction below)

    Just my tuppence.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2003
  9. vulcan

    vulcan Member

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    Hi folks,
    I haven't been around here for a while:eek:

    Lots of good points made. I like to add don't forget the hand held tong tools . Its just plain fun to use. I normally process all my pistol calibers to the point of expanding the mouth before storing, so Its a simple process to get a completed round with the tong tool. I like the lyman 310 tool, It has a old time feel to it.

    BTW since my cases are processed, I use 2 single stage presses like an assembly line. Drop charge, seat bullet on 1 press, Lee factory crimp die on 2nd press. It might seem odd, but it works efficiently for me :D .

    Happy Thanksgivings to all!
     
  10. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six member

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    I'll give you $6.00 a box, and pay shipping.

    That way, you can make a nice profit.
     
  11. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six member

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    However, since we shoot .45 ACP, and can afford to buy our ammo, a wise man wouldn't swear at us, or call us names.
    :fire:
     
  12. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    "If you want to assemble uber-consistent match-type loads, a single stage is what you need. Along with a good scale and powder trickler."

    From what I understand, more than just a few top-flight rifle shooters are now using Dillon progressives and showing no drop-off in accuracy with their loads.
     
  13. JohnK

    JohnK Member

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    There was an article about that in The Blue Press (Dillons magazine, so keep that in mind) by Bob Milek several years ago. He loaded up a batch of as I recall 223 with his single stage being carefull to weigh each charge etc all the typical things one would do for top accuracy varmint loads. Then loaded up an equal number on a Dillon 550b progressive and found that the Dillon loads were slightly more accurate, but close enough that he called them equally accurate.

    I do agree that a good scale is vital for safe and accurate loading though.
     
  14. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

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    OOOOPS

    What I said was...

    If you want to assemble uber-consistent match-type loads, a single stage is what you need. Along with a good scale and powder trickler.

    :banghead:

    What I MEANT to say was...

    If you want to DEVELOP uber-consistent match-type loads, a single stage is what you need. Along with a good scale and powder trickler.
     
  15. Hal

    Hal Member

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    I "plink" with the .44 mag in my Trapper - - -
    Any way you can think of to say that if you're using factory ammo?
    ('less you last name is Gates)
     
  16. wingman

    wingman Member

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    I started reloading over 35 years ago and find it relaxing, cost effective, and
    the best ammo for my guns. No down side for me.:D
     
  17. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    "If you want to DEVELOP uber-consistent match-type loads, a single stage is what you need. Along with a good scale and powder trickler."

    That I'll agree with.

    I also just arranged to purchase a used Lyman T-Mag turret press, which will largely replace the Lee Turret that I'm currently cursing...
     
  18. MoNsTeR

    MoNsTeR Member

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    Hey, you can do whatever you want. I guess it's good that there are some people in the world who are just fine paying 3 times as much as they need to for ammo, it keeps me in once-fired brass! :D
     
  19. zahc

    zahc Member

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    You shoot rounds that other people have reloaded?!:uhoh:
     
  20. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six member

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    Sounds good to me.

    Since I pay about $7.75 for fifty rounds at gun shows, by the case, that puts your computation of the true value of a box at between $2.58 and $2.59.

    Tell you what, I'll give you twice what you say the value is, I'll give you $5.18 per box, and I'll take all you're capable of producing. That way, not only will you make all kinds of money, but I'll get an even bigger break on ammo prices, and you can have all the brass back.

    Why won't anyone take me up on these fine offers? :evil:
     
  21. HogRider

    HogRider Member

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    ... I won't !

    True Story: About 12 years ago I had a friend who was an avid shooter and reloader. We always met at the range and I used to shoot a lot of his re-loads. He usually reloaded wad cutters for target practice. Whenever I had some brass I gave it to him and as an exchange he always gave me some ammo. I had a SW 686 and he shot a Colt Python, nickle plated and I think 4" barrel.

    Well, one day he was standing about 3 feet besides me when we were shooting and "boom" he had a blown up Python in his hand. We first looked at each other :uhoh: and then we looked at his Python :eek:. Now, after all this years, I almost think it was funny because it was so unreal.

    There were no injuries, but the Python was damaged beyond repair. Later in the evening on that same day I decided to buy my own re-loading equipment and I have never looked back. I have never shot anyone else reloads ( well almost ) since and I do not load for other people either.

    PS: It was never clear what caused the blow up, but we suspected a double charge of Bullseye under a 148gr Wad cutter. I do not remember if the case used was a .38 Special or .357 Magnum.
     
  22. P95Carry

    P95Carry Moderator Emeritus

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    That harley is I would say the most common KB cause ... a small load of fast powder leaves way too much space in a case and makes a double charge ... awful easy!! Same thing happened not once, but twice at my old club years back .... 158 FWC in one case ... 158 SWC the other.

    ''Victims'' of destruction? ..... one was 6" 686 .... the other a M19 .. both wrecked!!:(
     
  23. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    "You shoot rounds that other people have reloaded?!"

    There's a difference between shooting ammo that your buddy, Joe "The Drunken Monkey" Sixpack has reloaded and what a production reloader at a gun show has done, especially considering that they're licensed, bonded, and insured (at least they should be if they're smart).
     
  24. bompa

    bompa Member

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    I started reloading,back in the early 60's,with a tong tool..It worked but was slow as sin..Got a Lyman Spartan "C" press and was happy for a while.. Moved up to a Rockchucker,loved the ease sizing those rifle cases,and was still ok..In the 90's I tried a Lyman T mag and have never looked back..Shoot more handgun than rifle and the turrent is much quicker
    but still in total control..Perhaps a progressive would be much faster but I like too many different calibers and the time and expense to change calibers would be too much..
    Besides I guess I am just too old for a major change..
    By the way most of my guns have never seen a factory round and they have never complained..
     
  25. larryw

    larryw Member

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    Jammer Six, because it requires a special FFL to sell ammo that one loads. I don't have one, so hope you don't mind if I pass on your kind offer.

    I shoot roughly 2k 45acp, 1k 44Mag, a boatload of 223 and 308, as well as a few other calibers every month. While I can afford to buy the factory ammo to support my habit, I fail to see the reason to overpay for an inferior product.
     
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