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Not Afraid To Ask A Dumb Question!

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by beaucoup ammo, May 16, 2007.

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  1. beaucoup ammo

    beaucoup ammo Member

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    Just curious..I'm ready to break out of my "Stainless Mode" and go for a darkly colored revolver. The dumb question is: are those called "blued", or is there a letter designation in the model number that would allow me to know this is a "blued" or "dark" revolver?

    Thanks In Advance!
     
  2. EricTheBarbarian

    EricTheBarbarian Member

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    various
    theyre called blued
     
  3. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    The true blued revolvers are made of steel. I'm told that stainless steel, titanium, or aluminum do not take the traditional bluing well. The non-steel revolvers such as the Smith 442 is "dark" and is called blue, but it really is more of a black anodized finish. I still prefer it to the stainless looking one (642). Ruger generally offers many of their revolvers in either blue or stainless finish. For the most part, current or recent Smith production of blued guns is limited to special edition guns such as the current Model 29 and the older Model 21 and Model 57 Mountain Gun. Smith usually has a "6" prefix on the model number (such as 629) to indicate a stainless gun. The Model 29 is a blued steel firearm. Also previously offered in a nickel finish as Model 29. The blued guns just have more soul than the stainless guns to me.
     
  4. Jim March

    Jim March Member

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    Most "dark" guns are blued.

    Two notable exceptions:

    * If it's a strange "mottled color" it's case-hardened, or a fake version of that. You usually see this on single action "cowboy style" guns...but S&W has recently done up some of their classic DAs this way on special order.

    * There ARE a few ways to "darken" stainless. One example is the enamel gray finish on the Ruger SuperRedHawk when shipped in 454Casull or 480Ruger, and a few other DA guns as special runs.

    Non-stainless steels are often slightly stronger, although some very good stainless grades are being shipped by Ruger in the aforementioned SuperRedHawk and Freedom Arms in their whole product line.
     
  5. beaucoup ammo

    beaucoup ammo Member

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    22 Rim, Jim and Eric

    I appreciate the info. Certainly prepared to shop now! There's a thread in this forum titled "S&W 28-2" that has a couple of great shots of the color I'm looking for. Posts from Feanare and Vanilla_Gorilla.

    Thanks..
     
  6. ugaarguy

    ugaarguy Moderator Staff Member

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  7. skeeter1

    skeeter1 Member

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    I keep one stainless steel handgun that I bought for CCW while backpacking. That was just practical sense. All of the rest (long and short) are blued steel and walnut. They require only a bit more attention to prevent rust, but AFAIC are far more attractive.
     
  8. Shawn Michael

    Shawn Michael Member

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    Blued guns

    blued guns seem to have finer steel that "fits" tighter...I cant explain it, they just seem nicer than stainless
     
  9. HiWayMan

    HiWayMan Member

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    Your perception may have something to do with the fact that to get a proper, and good looking, blueing job the steel must be highly polished to begin with. The steel may be no finer than stainless, but the polish job is probably better.
     
  10. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    One of S&W's many model numbering schemes (they seemed to have a new one every week) used the initial number to indicate the material/finish. So a 586 was a blued carbon steel gun, and a 686 was the same gun, but in stainless steel. That was not a bright idea because some states (CA and MD) have "approval" systems that are model based. So one gun, in blued steel, would be approved and could be sold, but an identical gun made of stainless steel could not be. Lately, of course, S&W has pretty well gone to stainless or alloy for all their guns.

    Jim
     
  11. foghornl

    foghornl Member

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    Ruger puts the letter "K" in the model number to indicate a stainless gun.

    KGP-141 is the 4" GP-100 in stainless
    GP-141 is the 4" GP-100 in blue
     
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