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Not again.......! Feral Hog Control in East Texas

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Flintknapper, May 13, 2009.

  1. Ole Joe Clark

    Ole Joe Clark Member

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    I would try the pig, but you can keep the ground hog.

    Have a blessed day,

    Leon
     
  2. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Decided to go put in a little time on stand last night. Haven't pestered the hogs much in the last couple of months because of Deer Season.

    Anyway, the conditions were good. Cold, clear night....no moon out. The only bad thing was...it was dead still (no wind, absolutely quiet in the woods). In some situations...that can be good...as it makes it easy to hear anything approaching.

    On the other hand, you have to be REALLY still and quiet while on stand, because the hogs can hear YOU just as well as you can hear them.

    It was pretty cold here last night (for Texas) and after a couple of hours on stand....I was really wanting to fire up my Big Buddy propane heater. But I decided against it...since it makes a little bit of noise and also lights up the inside of the box blind.

    I've had pictures of two different boars visiting the automatic feeder at this stand site recently and they've been pretty consistent (coming in around 8:00 p.m.). One or the other...but never the two together.

    Well....just after 8 O'clock I heard a single pig let out a squeal about 150 yds. to my left but way back in the pines.

    Hmmmmmm.... not good!

    I've had boars do that before when they scent you or otherwise think something is wrong. 20 minutes passed with no other noises and no pig having shown up at the feeder. So...I'm thinking this hog has busted me, but resolve to sit it out another 30 minutes.

    About that time I spot some movement just in the very edge of the hog light at the feeder. I can see it is definitely a pig, and its definitely a 'grown' pig. So I pick up my binoculars and survey the area. The hog kept walking up to the edge of the light, but would then turn around and wander away from it. Without question....it was seeing the light or its own shadow and it made the hog very nervous.

    So this goes on for about 15 minutes, the hog becoming a little more accepting of it each time. Finally, the Boar committed and walked in under the feeder.

    I was afraid he wouldn't stay long...so I put the binoculars down and hastily got the barrel of the SOCOM out the window.

    I quickly found the pig in the scope and to my surprise it was already broadside, so there was nothing left to do but oblige him. I sent the 405 grain Softpoint which did its job (as they always do). NOW....I can turn on that darn heater and warm up.

    The other hog (a light colored animal) is larger than this one by a good measure. I am hoping the cold front that is coming will get him out and moving so I can get a crack at him as well.

    But for now, one less hog to propagate the species.

    Boar_01_14_18a_zpsjmpfijc3.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
  3. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    I have to admit, I don’t get much time to myself these days but did have Saturday afternoon and night. So I loaded up myself and headed to east TX. I watched the deer and when I got bored was going to read a bit and noticed I now have signal in the blind for other stuff.

    BC777B3E-D9B2-4494-9E08-C8CC9E70F0AC.jpeg

    I too find the heater to put out too much light after dark and was thinking about a solution, didn’t have much time so I just put out a couple game radios I made. 26DFD8E8-7C4D-47D0-8EC8-8495AC8D223E.jpeg

    Just screw them to a tree or wire them to a post and when something moves, they key up a digital recorder and play back what was recorded at the same time they power up the radio that is keyed up.

    B5C345A1-0155-416C-BF7A-95CA12DBCFDF.jpeg

    I generally use them so we don’t have to be in a blind and can sneak up on them once we know they are there but the radios work just as good up close.

    When it goes off just make it dark inside, let the window down and...

    6D932251-7B71-4FBD-9B78-5ECF8D15EC1F.jpeg
     
  4. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    ^^^^^^^^ That hog has GREAT cutters, congratulations. Those are the kind the guys running dogs don't want to see (sort of straight up and sharp)! They can really hook you, a dog or anything else.
     

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  5. Nature Boy

    Nature Boy Member

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  6. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I like it, innovative use of technology. :D


    Well, I've been having a couple of the same resident hogs show up regular for the last 4 or 5 evenings just after 7pm at my feeder. I might load up the SKS and go try to gangster one of 'em this evening.
     
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  7. SoonerMedic

    SoonerMedic Member

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    I'm under the assumption that the rear tooth is called a whetter to give respect to a whet stone? Sharpens the cutter as it slides across the whetter?
     
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  8. Nimrod2

    Nimrod2 Member

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    Flintknapper,
    I had an interesting encounter with a sounder this evening and I would like your take on it.
    I was driving out of our hunting property at sunset when I spotted a medium sized sow with a several smaller hogs feeding in a fire lane. The surrounding area is an overgrown former sugar cane field where you can't see 10 feet.
    The wind was in my favor so I stalked to about 60 yards when she spotted me and I popped her shoulder using an AR 5.56 loaded with Winchester Hog Specials. She ran off squealing like crazy while I fired several more shots at the remaining pigs. They disappeared into the surrounding thicket so I waited a few minutes before checking for a blood trail.
    Things had gotten pretty quiet when I became aware of a low growling that seemed to be about 20 yards away in the thicket.. I couldn't see a thing and with darkness approaching, the growling sound seemed to be getting closer. It was not unlike the growling you might expect from a lion and it was pretty unnerving.
    Your previous posts led me to believe that it was probably a large boar but I didn't expect that behavior after having just unleashed a fusillade at the sounder. I backed away all the way to my Jeep and the sound seemed to follow me about 50 yards or so before reaching my vehicle. I tried to remember how many shots were remaining in the magazine. Before reaching my Jeep, I was wishing I had my 1911. Finally, as I reached my vehicle, the growling stopped.
    This was a first for me. There are some really big hogs out here and they are lightly hunted. Have you ever experienced such behavior?
     
  9. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Correct. The 'whetter' is positioned behind (to the rear of) the cutter, but it is also located in the upper jaw (Maxilla), whereas the 'cutter' is in the lower jaw (Mandible). Both of these 'canine' teeth grow continuously during a pigs lifetime.

    The constant 'meshing' of the two....results in the wearing down of both teeth which in turn forms a particular 'profile'.

    The 'cutter' while often described as being Razor Sharp....is anything but. Additionally, unless a pig bites you (uses the shearing action of the canines) you are not going to be 'cut', you will be 'ripped' (equally unappealing). Usually the pointed end of the cutter is what causes the damage.
     

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  10. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    I've heard Sows make a grunting sound that can be somewhat intimidating, but never heard one make the low, guttural 'growl' that Boars will sometimes make when disturbed. Once you've heard it....it will not be mistaken for anything else.

    It is extremely unlikely the sound you heard was being made by the wounded Sow. My best guess is that a Boar was present all along (though not visible). The most likely scenario is that one or more of the female pigs was in estrous....or about to be....and that the boar was there intent upon breeding. They can be quite brazen under those circumstances.

    I've never been able to associate that particular behavior (growling) with 'intent to attack'. Rather...it seems to be something that is done to convey several messages:

    1. Let everything around KNOW the Boar is there.
    2. Let the offending party know the Boar is not happy.
    3. Let the offending party know the Boar will leave when he is darn good and ready.
    4. Convince all within earshot....they should be 'scared', though all the bluster is generally done from a distance and out of sight.

    Bottom line, I think you interrupted his date.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2018
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  11. SoonerMedic

    SoonerMedic Member

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    Roger that! Thank you for the explanation. How do you go about extracting the teeth without damaging them??
     
  12. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Let the skull dry out. It will shrink considerably around all the teeth. The Whetter's can usually be wiggled out by hand. The Cutters can be wiggled out a certain amount, but owing to the shape and amount of tooth embedded in the jaw bone.....they usually need some persuasion.

    When I have one that sticks....I use a pair of channel lock pliers to crush the bone around the tooth. I don't recommend grabbing the tooth itself....as they are easily broken.
     

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  13. popper

    popper Member

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    Looks like the warfarin poison has left Texas for now.
     
  14. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Not a moment too soon. IMO it was 'fast tracked' from the very beginning in a number of ways, for a number of reasons (not to include practicality).

    But that's all been covered here (and elsewhere) already....so I won't get started on that subject again.
     
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  15. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    O.K. so recently I've pretty much left the hogs alone...because they 'pretty much' have been staying back in the woods.

    As long as they stay out of my pastures and aren't tearing things up... I let them do whatever hogs like to do.

    But...this morning while I was mowing a small swath of grass in front of a shooting target, I noticed a fairly large area where the hogs had been rooting the pasture. I went over to have a look and could see that there were three more areas (equally as bad). So.....four spots that will have to be repaired.

    We aren't talking just 'pot holes'....but areas completely denuded of vegetation. Some areas 12"-16" deep.

    I drove my mower over to one of the spots to provide some 'scale' of the damage. Not the worst (by far) that I've ever suffered, but enough to make my blood boil.

    You would think as smart as hogs are..... they would figure out 'If they come out in the pasture and root things up, THERE'S GOING TO BE TROUBLE' !

    So sometime in the next few days....I am going to have to un-case 'trouble' (the SOCOM) and go teach the hogs a hard lesson. It never ends. :(
     

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  16. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    I had them come up by my house when we had 2" of snow on the ground. I had the heat insert (fireplace) fan running so I did not hear a thing. I heat the whole house with this insert. I just got every thing leveled back out, ready to see how the grass is going to come back. Had a hog tear up my trap so I had to beef it up. When I built it for my dad he did not want to buy (spend money) on any angle iron. This was really needed to make it stiff and strong. I purchased a bunch of angle iron, and sq tubing and beefed it up like it should have been. They are not going to damage this one now and get out.

    About 6 weeks ago I got a 2 for 1 shot with the 458 SOCOM, 300gr HP. Went through the first one length wise, hitting the second one in the neck. These were small hogs < 100#. I had baited a hole with some corn that went bad. Ended up getting 4 hogs, 2 coons off of that single baiting.

    A neighbor trapped some small ones by his church. These were only 60-80# and already carrying piglets (2). These animals are breading at a alarming rate.
     
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  17. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    ^^^^^^^ Good work.

    The first 'Two-fer' I had happen was quite by accident. But it made me realize with heavy bullets, careful shot placement and two or more pigs (close together) lined up, that taking more than one with a single shot was not only 'doable' but something to be expected.

    For quite a few years now....I 'look' carefully for an opportunity to take a shot at two or more pigs when they crowd together to feed. This works especially well at baited sites. If you place a 'string' of corn about 10' long perpendicular to your shooting position...the pigs will line up as if feeding at a trough. (Well....after they quit fighting and jockeying for position anyway).

    You can also dig shallow holes in a line (one behind the other) to help keep them in one spot longer. The first hole placed where you can get a good shot, the second and third behind the first but slightly staggered so that your shot on the first hog is tight behind the shoulder but the hogs behind it will be hit directly though the shoulder or neck.

    At my 100 yd. bait sites I use a 400 grain soft point. At my 40 yd. stand I use a hard-cast 540 grain bullet. It will shoot through as many hogs as you can get to line up.
     
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  18. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Been raining here non-stop the last two days (clearing just yesterday afternoon), so I haven't been able to go after the hogs.

    As it turns out...they came to ME early this morning. I had let our two dachshunds out in the yard to do their 'business' and as I was standing on the back porch watching the cows graze, low and behold a group of about 10 pigs slowly walked out into the pasture. It was just barely light....so I went got my binoculars to take a look at them. Yep, no doubt about it....I could see them starting to root up the ground as they worked their way across the pasture. Arrrrrgh....!

    Thankfully, the dogs hadn't seen them, (the hogs being some 150 yds. distant). So I quietly coaxed the wiener dogs back into the house. I grabbed the 7mm-08 from the closet and walked out to the end of the fenced in backyard. The 5' chain-link fence made a rest (sort of) about the right height. I've shot hogs from that position before...just not in my Pajamas.

    I surveyed the group of hogs through the scope, all were about the same size and all were rooting along... not tense or alarmed. The lead hog was closest about 150 yds. so I thought I'd shoot it first... then see if I could get off another shot before the group could make it to cover.

    The lead hog had been broadside...but was now facing me at a quartering angle. Not ideal for the 7mm-08 but 'doable' if I hit the neck or point of the shoulder. I was really more concerned with getting a second shot on what I knew would be running hogs.

    At the shot the first hog crumpled and the others were now running to get to the edge of the pasture. They only had to cover about 40 yds. to reach safety.

    Leaving the rifle shouldered I worked the bolt as quickly as I could and swung the illuminated cross-hairs out ahead of the last pig in line. I touched off the shot and by the grace of God the bullet hit. Where it hit...I am not certain yet as I haven't gone to go pick them up, but the pig went down.

    So after I get some breakfast....I'll drive out into the pasture and get some pics.

    Maybe get a chance to take out a few more tomorrow night. Game camera showing some hogs (perhaps this group) visiting the bait site.

    Edit to add photo:

    ^^^^^ Couple of medium sized Boars (150-ish). First one hit in the neck, second one in the spine behind the shoulder.
    PP3_zpsrmxu8apa.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2018
  19. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    ^^^^^^^
    On my game cam from last night:

    Here is a good example of how I might ‘wait’ for two or more hogs to feed closely together (or line up) for a shot opportunity that will result in hitting multiple hogs with a single shot. You can see in this video (at one of my bait sites) that two hogs have positioned themselves very close together. The perfect set-up for a pass through shot to strike the second pig.



    I might go sit this evening since I have hogs coming to both bait sites.
     
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  20. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    ^^^^^ Decided to go to the 100 yd. stand at the far end of the property just in case this mornings shooting in the pasture had the pigs spooked at the bait site behind my house. Game camera was showing a pretty good Boar and one Sow with 4-5 shoats coming in right before dark.

    I took the 7mm-08 since I would not be trying to shoot through several hogs with one shot...plus it has a 3 x 15 Scope on it, compared to the 1.5 x 4.5 on the SOCOM.

    Just before dark I saw the shoats run across the old logging road and head toward the feeder. Next pig out was the Sow. She stood in the road a good two minutes not moving a muscle. I waited to see if the Boar might be behind her...but IF he was, he never showed himself.

    The Sow made her way to the feeder where the smaller pigs were fighting one another for the corn. She finally settled down and offered a broadside shot.

    At the shot...instead of dropping right there..... she took off like a scalded dog! I couldn't believe my eyes, what could have happened? I had held dead center on the shoulder and fairly high so as to shock/sever the spine. Its a shot I've made a hundred times.

    Well....nothing left to do but get down and look for a blood trail. I don't like for them to 'run' at this bait site because the area is choked with pine saplings and green-brier. Of course...they head right for it every time. At the feeder I found good evidence of a hit. I walked a few yards and found the beginning of a blood trail. Naturally, it went off into the thicket.

    By now...it is fully dark and I am following the blood-trail with my flashlight and literally having to get down on my hands and knees in places. We just had about 4" of rain the previous two days...so things were nice and muddy. About 50 yds. into this mess....I'm asking myself 'why am I doing this' I know the hog is mortally wounded. But I pressed on anyway.

    Another 50 yds. and the blood-trail started getting pretty thin. That either means the bullet hole(s) have plugged up or the hog has bled out and will be laying dead (hopefully) in a very short distance.

    I pushed my way through some pine saplings and there she lay in the only small opening around. I wasn't about to try to drag her out, so I took one really bad picture and got myself out of there. Both of my legs and arms were scratched up from the green-brier. At one point I am certain I was bleeding more than the hog.

    The shot placement looked good....so I can only guess there was a bullet failure for the pig to have run that far. Or maybe she was just one of the 'tough ones'. Anyway, one less hog to worry about....and three 'total' for the day.
     

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  21. Terry Vincent

    Terry Vincent Member

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    The hunting gods have been kind to me this trip. I have been fortunate to have access to south Texas hill country ranches and the results speak for themselves. Like Flintnapper, I think the big bore is the best choice, so I use a Henry 45-70 cowboy assault rifle, and it always works. image.png
     
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  22. Terry Vincent

    Terry Vincent Member

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    image.jpeg I was looking for a fifty pound sow to grill for a family gathering. The recon X was showing a sounder coming to the feeder regularly at 6:20 pm, so rather than using the 45-70, I elected to use the Henry Big Boy 357 mag. The 45-70 with Hornady 325 grain FTX tend to make hog parts out of the little ones.

    Well, the sounder with a dozen little piglets didn't show, imagine that! About 8:00 pm this boar came to the feeder and stayed just out of the light circle eating the corn. It was dark and I couldn't see him, only hear the corn grinding between his molars. After about twenty minutes he had moved to about twenty yards from the stand and I could barely make out his sillouette. I didn't have a clue how big he was (he weighed 222 lbs live weight) but I hoped he might be a young boar which would be fine for the dinner table. Normally, I wouldn't try to shoot a boar over 200 lbs with a 357 mag, even in a rifle, however, when I turned on the light, he bolted right to me and stopped five yards in front of the stand. The red dot was right there and he took the 158 grain Hornady HP through the lungs. The bullet did not exit, but it created a two inch entrance hole high on his rib cage just behind the shoulder. He was so close, the angle of penetration was nearly vertical, and there was no blood trail.

    As I began looking for him I replayed the shot and still couldn't guess his size. The entire sequence after I turned on the light only took two or three seconds. I was moving in the direction he bolted after the shot and was using my head lamp when I nearly stumbled on his resting spot forty yards from the stand.
     
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  23. Terry Vincent

    Terry Vincent Member

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg Now here is something you don't see every day. This boar was hitting a feeder late at night and displayed an unusually noticeable cutter. It took a week of night stands to finally get him to cooperate and when found in the morning after the shot it was noted his upper tusk had been broken off some time ago allowing the lower to grow unimpeded.

    I don't have any idea how fast a boar's tusk grows but this one must have been growing for while.
     
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  24. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    ^^^^^

    Had I known how effective large caliber, medium velocity cartridges would be on pigs....I would have gotten something LONG ago. The .458 SOCOM (as you know) is the ballistic twin of medium tier 45/70 loads and of course can use the same bullets.

    The only downside is the trajectory. Most of my loads begin to drop like a marble off a table...much over 125 yds. but those are 400-500+ grain bullets. Fortunately most of my shots fall under that distance.
     
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  25. Terry Vincent

    Terry Vincent Member

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    Normally, I use a 405 grain gas checked cast bullet at 1650 fps. Any boar over 200 lbs has not stopped this load or traveled more than fifty yards. It kills way out of proportion to the paper ballistics presented for the cartridge, regardless of the angle of penetration, or what bone the bullet impacts.

    I gave the Hornady 325 grain FTX a try and found it very effective on 200lb to 250 lb boars. All of my stands are by design close, less than fifty yards with a couple at 25 to 30 yards. The hogs I hunt are all nocturnal, so dark to very dark shots are the norm, close makes them doable with a certainty. The 325 grain Hornady will penetrate completely through a broadside boar weighing 250 lbs, but it doesn't have the exit hole the 405 grain enjoys. I have not seen or shot anything bigger than the boar I posted last night and I estimate his weight at 275 lbs. I used the Hornady 325 gr FTX on a broad side shot this time and got complete penetration with the boar traveling 70 yards. The hit was through the back of the lungs and the liver as he bolted when I turned on my light and I only had two or three seconds to shoot before he made it back into the brush. Fast action, exciting to say the least and fairly typical of boars this size. They don't get big by being stupid.
     
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