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Not loving reloading.

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by 9mm+, Mar 11, 2010.

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  1. 9mm+

    9mm+ Member

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    Okay, I have been working with a buddy's reloading setup while saving up to buy a rig of my own. The plan is to start reloading my 40S&W's primarily (I shoot that caliber the most) and save some money in the end. To be perfectly honest, I find the whole thing a pain. It's quite time-consuming (mainly because I am not good at it yet), and I don't find the case inspection, cleaning, primer setting, etc. to be very...well...rewarding.

    Maybe I am not patient enough for reloading or maybe I simply need to stick with it longer to get "in the groove". In any case, I am holding off purchasing my own setup for now. My groupings with purchased remanufactured rounds are as good as what I am getting with my own reloading.

    For those who are far more experienced than I in reloading, is there some "ah ha" moment just around the bend or is this as good as it gets?
     
  2. Buck Snort

    Buck Snort Member

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    Its not everybody's cup of tea.
     
  3. ants

    ants Member

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    Quit. You're hoarding up primers needed by the rest of us.

    :neener:

    Just kidding. Seriously, if it ain't your thing, don't do it.
     
  4. Quoheleth

    Quoheleth Member

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    If you don't enjoy detailed work, working with your hands, and multi-steped processes to achieve an end, reloading might not be for you. That's OK - it's not for everyone. Better to be honest with yourself now, before investing in the equipment and components, rather than after spending several hundred bucks.

    I'll give you two attaboys for being honest with yourself...and for saving the primers for the rest of us. :neener:

    Q
     
  5. jfh

    jfh Member

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    Maybe you are still at the spot where the tasks involved in reloading just appear to be a jumble, so to speak--or not part of an organized workflow that either 1) is enjoyable in and of itself, or 2) has a satisfying end product. If that is true, then you can try re-reading some of the introductory information--say, the ABC's book, or the Lyman books.

    But, if you think you understand the process and are just not motivated by it--it's probably better to quit now. Dissatisfaction can lead to distraction which can lead to unpleasant results in reloading.

    There's nothing wrong with not being the type personality for reloading--for all I know, you can enjoy shooting more than I do.

    Meanwhile, as ants implies--I'll buy those spare primers....

    Jim H.
     
  6. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    What kind of reloader ??? Some are easy to work with and some are harder. If you shoot more then 1000 rds. a year reloading is a nesisary evil !!!
     
  7. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    For me there was no "ah ha" moment. I was hooked from the get go.
    Handloading is a tedious and precise process and not everyone enjoys such things. It's all right. To each his own brother.
     
  8. Mags

    Mags Member

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    If this is your ONLY goal:
    reloading is not for you. Now if you want something fun to do while you are not shooting and want to get the most out of your loads by finding the best recipe for your gun than reloading may be for you.
     
  9. ezypikns

    ezypikns Member

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    I get a lot of satisfaction out reloading.

    I may be fooling myself but I think I save a little money. Plus I enjoy the thought and concentration it takes to safely produce good safe shootable ammo.

    I started out with a single stage press and now have a Dillon 550. I can load 250 rds. in an hour (which is really a little on the slow side).

    I guess though that reloading is like anything else...it's not for everyone.
     
  10. Hatterasguy

    Hatterasguy Member

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    I don't reload, don't have the time.

    My friend does, and manages to spend twice what I do. So while you can save money, if you factor in your time its a wash.


    Reloading for me is like fly tying. When I retire in oh 40 years I'll take both of them up. But now I just like shooting. I'm off to Cabala's this weekend to buy 400 rounds of 5.56 for $140 and I'll blow it all down range Friday.
     
  11. dld

    dld Member

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    joys of reloading

    when I was in my early twenty's I started reloading and like you had better things to do with my time, even if it was nothing:banghead:
    thirty years later I gave it a try again still using the same set up and material.
    I enjoy it now, I am not in a big hurry, I have other chores I dislike doing even worse so reloading is my time well spent.
    It does not matter that I am saving money, it is just the accomplishment of doing something well and seeing the results of it.
    Hang in there, stop and smell the roses:what:
     
  12. Texas Gun Person

    Texas Gun Person Member

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    Like most others are saying. It's not for everyone.


    I don't do it just to save money. I enjoy activities that give me something to do. :) I hate sitting on the couch and watching TV.

    I also enjoy cleaning guns after a day of shooting... :D I just find it rewarding to take care of things that are my own. Because many people don't that have luxury in the world.
     
  13. Hatterasguy

    Hatterasguy Member

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    I'm 24, so no I will not stop and smell the roses.:D

    I agree with you though, I'll probably start reloading at some point in my life. Just not now.
     
  14. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    I'll agree with the "what press?" question.

    If you're trying to load bulk handgun ammo on a single stage press (or even perhaps a turret press) it could definitely seem horribly tedious.

    I shoot a fair number of rounds a year and my process is to tumble the empty cases and then run them through my progressive press. I'll inspect them as I'm picking up each case (no auto case feeder) and otherwise just keep a watchful eye as I insert the bullets (no bullet feeder) and pull the handle. Otherwise the press is doing all the work for me. A solid hour of reloading will produce an honest 500 rds, so this isn't something I have to do more than once or twice a month.

    This is a very different procedure than loading high precision rifle cartridges where every step is as exacting and hands-on as possible. A single-stage or turret press makes a lot of sense for that kind of work.

    If you're using the most efficient equipment for the job and still find that you just aren't into it, reloading certainly may not be for you. That's fine! Take the time you'd have spent on loading and work an extra hour so you can buy a box of factory stuff! :D
     
  15. geigersd

    geigersd Member

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    These are the two best replies you can get. Yes it's detailed and not everyone is into that.:barf: And yes, distraction can get you hurt or killed. :eek:

    I started out reloading to "save money", and ended up loving the process and detail work. My goal now is to find the best loads for my weapons, and the side benefit is the cost reduction of reloading. Good luck with your decision and be safe above all else!

    If you do decide to continue, the Reloading section here is very helpful, and the people who post on it are very knowledgeable.
     
  16. jmortimer

    jmortimer Member

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    The type of ammunition I like would be very expensive. Top of the line heat treated hard cast LBT bullets like Buffalo Bore and Double Tap - So I save a bundle. But it is not just about $$$. I never really think too much about the process - for some reason my mind is on the end result - a fantasic round of ammunition that will smoke the intended target - either two or four legged.
     
  17. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    Not loving reloading? How can this be? BLASPHEMY!!

    Seriously, its not for everyone. Personally, I like reloading almost as much as shooting.
     
  18. 4D5

    4D5 Member

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    Re-manufactured ammo...

    I'd shop wisely when buying re-manufactured ammo.

    Before I reloaded I used re-manufactured ammo. Well one day at the range I was doing some rapid fire revolver work with re-manufactured ammo. I had a round only detonate the primer and send the bullet into the barrel. Fortunately I caught it before I pulled the trigger again :what:

    Had I not, the outcome would have been dramatically different.

    It's kind of like not shooting someone else's reloads in your gun.
     
  19. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    Like Sam said above. I have 1 Dillon 550 and 6 Lee Pro1000s --- all are progressives and all pump out one loaded round for each pull of the handle --- I mainly stick with handgun loads with these presses.

    For Hi-Power rifles , I use a Lyman Turret press and a old lyman single stage press. With centerfire rifle loading --- you are makeing loads with 3 -5 times the explosive power of most pistol loads ---- for me , the extra time involved with the rifle loads is worth the caution.

    I've competed in " Action Pistol " matches for 20-25 years --- in my "prime" I would be shooting over 50,000 rounds A YEAR !!! NO WAY could I have been able to buy factory ammo , even if I worked three jobs !!!
     
  20. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    Your gonna need to come up with a shooting objective beyond just burning-up .40 ammo if you're ever going to enjoy reloading.

    The process needs to become an end unto itself for you to get the most out of it.

    Let me suggest that you go out and buy a 32-20 lever gun and work on your loads for that.
    I guarantee it will distract you from that horridly un-interesting .40 crunchenticker.

    If you wanna shoot .40 or 9mm, just buy a couple cases of Wolf an be done with it.
     
  21. wvshooter

    wvshooter Member

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    I have a RCBS single stage press which I use to load 9mm, 40 S&W, 38 special and 357 magnum. I started because I like to do a lot of shooting and don't like paying retail prices for factory ammo. BTW, I would never shoot reloaded ammo that I had not reloaded myself. I only trust me.

    Bottom line, if you do a lot of shooting reloading is a must unless you've got more spendable income than most of us. If you are that person that shoots a lot I'd recommend a Dillon progressive press. Tremendous quality and they will pump out a lot of ammo in a hurry. The best I can do with my single stage press in 80 rounds per hour. Yes it's boring reloading handgun ammo but because of my press I've got several thousand rounds on hand and that's a good feeling.
     
  22. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    AMEN to that my brother !!!!! I laughed out loud for a year or two and still do when I read people crying and moaning about the gun stores being out of ammo !!!!

    At ALL TIMES , I have a minimun of 1000 rds. loaded for EVERY calibur I own --- .32s , .38s , .357s , 38 Super , 9mm , 10mm , 40S&W , .45acp , 44spl , 44mag , 45LC , and a few others. NO WAY , could I afford that if it was factory ammo.

    And I do agree ---- BE VERY CAREFULL buying remanufactored i.e. -- someone else's reloads. At a gun show etc. --- make sure to ask for a copy of their insurance policy.
     
  23. Beelzy

    Beelzy Member

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    Uh......don't now how to say this but...

    It's still time consuming even when you are a pro at reloading.

    (More primers for me.LOL!!!)
     
  24. mcdonl

    mcdonl Member

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    I loved it the first time I did it, but I have kids and like the "time away" in the basement and I am in no hurry. Also, my 10 year old loves to help me cast, size and lube.

    No money savings... I now spend every penny I get on reloading and casting supplies.
     
  25. ole farmerbuck

    ole farmerbuck Member

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    I would almost rather load than shoot. I like working up new loads. I think of reloading as a challenge to get the best groups.
     
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