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Not so dead Buck

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by deaconkharma, Dec 2, 2008.

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  1. deaconkharma

    deaconkharma Member

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    http://www.rockymountainnews.com/news/2008/dec/02/wounded-deer-attacks-hunter-who-shot-him/

    SEDALIA, Mo. — A Sedalia hunter bagged a big buck on the second day of firearms season, but the kill caused him a lot of pain.

    Forty-nine-year-old Randy Goodman said he thought two well-placed shots with his .270-caliber rifle had killed the buck on Nov. 19. Goodman said the deer looked dead to him, but seconds later the nine-point, 240-pound animal came to life.

    The buck rose up, knocked Goodman down and attacked him with his antlers in what the veteran hunter called "15 seconds of hell." The deer ran a short distance and went down, and died after Goodman fired two more shots.

    Soon Goodman started feeling dizzy and noticed his vest was soaked in blood.

    So he reached his truck and drove to a hospital, where he received seven staples in his scalp and was treated for a slight concussion and bruises.

    ---Dunno about this case but I always was told if the eyes are closed, shoot it again.:uhoh:
     
  2. Highland Ranger

    Highland Ranger Member

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    Hunter safety course says to poke em in the eye to make sure.

    Sounds like he got too close too soon.
     
  3. John Peddie

    John Peddie Member

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    Large dead animals lying on their sides should be approached from the rear, and on the spine side-never in the way of hooves or horns.

    That way, if it suddenly gets "undead", you aren't an obstacle when it tries to escape, its natural reaction.

    I've shot 30+ black bears while working in Northern Ontario. This was an inviolable rule for us. Like deer, black bears are rarely dangerous and would rather flee.

    But wounded, they can function on adrenalin for a short time-long enough to cause grief. Don't be in their escape route.
     
  4. uk roe hunter

    uk roe hunter Member

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    sound advice

    Hunter safety course says to poke em in the eye to make sure.

    this is sound advice. use the end of your stick or rifle barrell.

    uk
     
  5. BP44

    BP44 Member

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    I always poke'em in the eye or ear but what happened to give the animal time.I grew up hunting archery and it was always instilled to give the animal time and dont push them and as my dad always said " if you think your going to slow, SLOW DOWN". Animals are unpredictable when they are alive and well, but become more so when the are wounded.
     
  6. Thin Black Line

    Thin Black Line Member

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    I think for this buck poking it in the eye would have p1ssed it off even more.

    [poke-poke] "SNORT!" [JUMPS UP] "Holy S$#*#@*&!" "SNORT! SNORT!"
    [STOMP STOMP STOMP][Gurgling sound from hunter] [Buck --now fully
    satisfied with its handiwork--falls over dead] [THUMP]. [Video from guy on
    next tree-stand appears on youtube within minutes].

    Yes, I've always heard to wait 15-20 minutes.
     
  7. mbt2001

    mbt2001 Member

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    ouch....

    Well, not to offend anyone, but that is kind of what makes hunting fun... The unknown, pitting your skills against the skills of another, and so on. The edge of danger makes it more fun.

    You always approach a wounded animal so that you can see it's back from the hindquater side. If the eyes are shut and you have a sidearm, that is when you use the side arm or a knife. Hold onto the antlers tight in that case.

    If it is a hog, or bear or something that can bite back then blast em again don't use the knife.
     
  8. Thin Black Line

    Thin Black Line Member

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    [poke-poke] "What's that strange jelly coming out of that meteor?" [splop]
    "Oh, no, it's on my hand!"

    Sorry, couldn't resist.
     
  9. MDMadrid

    MDMadrid Member

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    :) Very Funny...maybe the guy that wants to kick a pig to death could try it on this deer!!

    [poke-poke] "Snort" [deer gets up] "chop and kick to head" [sound of deer laughing] AHHHHH [deer kicks guy's butt] [sound of deer up loading his own youtube video] :neener:
     
  10. rodomonte

    rodomonte Member

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    I was telling that deer story to a friend of mine last week, but he had a topper. Seems that when he was 12 years old, he went along on a deer hunting trip with a friend's uncle. They brought along a camera. After a buck was shot, the uncle placed his rifle between the antlers and asked that a picture of he and the dead deer be taken. Before that could happen, the buck jumped up and ran off with his rifle! Neither deer nor rifle was ever heard from again.
     
  11. Ranger J

    Ranger J Member

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    That story, deer runs off with gun, has been around for over 30 years or so as I heard it when I started deer hunting way back in the dark ages. Stories of hunters being attacked by 'dead' deer' were also. These stories make good cover for actually getting excited and falling out of stand. etc. and getting bunged up on stobs and such. "Yep, that darn deer got up and attacked me and he and I went hand to antler there for a while. That's how I got all these cuts and bruises."

    RJ
     
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