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Novel Recommendations

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by WildeKurt, Jan 22, 2008.

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  1. WildeKurt

    WildeKurt Member

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    I wonder if anyone can recommend some authors/novels which are either firearm related or accurately depict their use as part of the story. I need some brain candy to keep me occupied in airports.
     
  2. harmonic

    harmonic member

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    I'm reading "Time To Hunt" by Stephen Hunter. He's very detailed at presenting a sniper's world. Even down to his descriptions of the sniper's ammo.
     
  3. ilbob

    ilbob Member

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    His three Bob Lee Swaggert books are quite readable.

    The best authors that have the most realistic stories often have very little gun play in them, since gun play is fairly rare. But they also do it right when they do it.

    Some of the Clancy books have a small amount of well done shooting scenes. As do some of the WEB Griffin Brotherhood of War and Corps books. But mostly these books are not about guns, or shooters, so much as they are about people.

    Unintended Consequences has good gun scenes as well, but its really not a gun play book either.
     
  4. strat81

    strat81 Member

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    Unintended Consequences
    Monster Hunter International
     
  5. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Well, they are not a constant blaze of gunfire like more recent adventure thrillers (ilbob is right on that), but Donald Hamilton got nearly all of the gun stuff right in the Matt Helm stories. Do not confuse the books with the silly Dean Martin movies.

    Hunter does not know as much about guns as he would have you think.
     
  6. usp_fan

    usp_fan Member

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    +1 for Monster Hunter International. Written by one of our own THR members. Just finished it last week, well written, good story line, an lots of accurate firearms usage. You can get it through Amazon or directly from the author Larry Correia.
     
  7. Phil DeGraves

    Phil DeGraves Member

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    Read mine. Please.
     
  8. TX1911fan

    TX1911fan Member

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    Andy McNab was a soldier with the SAS and writes a pretty good book, with pretty accurate gun play (except he keeps up with the weak magazine spring thing. He advocates unloading magazines every couple of days to relieve the stress). He's British, so some of the terms are different, but I don't think I've ever seen him call a magazine a clip, so thank goodness for that.
     
  9. tbone3

    tbone3 Member

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    I'm also reading "Time to Hunt" by Stephen Hunter right now. I read the first in the series, "Point of Impact" but I haven't read the second yet. Freakin' Amazon seller never got it to me.:mad: They are both great reads.
     
  10. cdrt

    cdrt Member

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    Hunter's new book The 47th Samurai is pretty good, though not as firearms related as his other Bob Lee Swagger books. There is more in this book on his father's time on Iwo Jima.
     
  11. MK11

    MK11 Member

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    Marcus Wynne is pretty good. He's a former "operator" who's a halfway decent writer. The plots are pretty out there but the gun (and knife) stuff is spot-on.

    Barry Eisler's "Rain" series is decent on the action and correct use of firearms.

    John Sandford is a mystery writer who I highly recommend. Pretty good firearms knowledge (in his latest, the character makes a special trip home to get a .30-06 after someone takes a potshot at him with a rifle). He's also a good writer, rather than just gun guy turned writer.
     
  12. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Member

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    I forget the author, but if you want a good Historical read, "The Arms of Krup" about the Krup family dynasty in Germany is very interesting.
     
  13. geim druth

    geim druth Member

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    I just read and enjoyed '1632' by Eric Flint.

    There are a bunch of sequels, '1633', '1634', etc. I don't know if they're as much fun as the original.
     
  14. sharkhunter2018

    sharkhunter2018 Member

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    "Seven Roads to Hell: A Screaming Eagle at Bastogne" by Donald R. Burgett.
    The author was just nineteen at the time he was at Bastogne. I would read it again in a heartbeat (coming from someone who does not like to read :))
     
  15. Correia

    Correia Moderator Emeritus

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  16. Correia

    Correia Moderator Emeritus

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  17. jpr9954

    jpr9954 Member

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    A couple of names come to mind. First, Alan Furst who writes some of the best pre-WWII spy novels around. Usually centered around either Paris or Eastern Europe, he weaves guns like the Polish Radom and the Steyr Hahn into his stories. I don't anyone can touch him in creating that film noir feel of smokiness, a Paris cafe, and genteel shabbiness. See his website: http://www.alanfurst.net

    The other name is Brad Thor. He was new to me but has made some best-seller lists. I heard him being interviewed on Gun Talk Radio and then read a couple of his books. "Lions of Lucerne" and "Path of the Assassin" are both very good. A bit lighter than Furst but still good. His website is http://www.bradthor.com/

    John
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2008
  18. Howard Roark

    Howard Roark Member

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    All of Vince Flynn's books.
     
  19. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    The Zombie Survival Guide, or World War Z by Max Brooks. I love his work.

    Also, if you want something stimulating, try The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. Not really gun-related, but something everyone should have to read at least twice.
     
  20. Kentucky

    Kentucky Member

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    1. Unintended Consequences. THE MUST READ for anyone who values firearms, freedom, and our heritage. Nothing else comes close IMO.

    2. Molon Labe. Some gun play, not the main focus of the book though. THe author clearly knows a lot about firearms (he should :) )

    3. EFAD and The Reconquista both have a lot of gunplay in them, again the author obviously knows quite a bit about guns.

    4. Monster Hunter. I havent read it myself but I enjoy reading the author's contributions on here:D

    What does it say about THR that the authors of all 4 of these books are THR members? What a resource for gun owners! You can probably get John Ross, Boston T Party, Matthew Bracken, or Larry Correia to answer questions personally about their books on here.
     
  21. Coltdriver

    Coltdriver Member

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    Go get Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. Spectacular read. The man is hailed as Americas greatest living author. The book is about a kid who goes from Tennessee to Texas and joins a band of hunters paid by the people of Chihuahua to keep the indians at bay. It is historically accurate and one of the best books I have ever read. The authors use of the english language is something you have to experience to fully appreciate.
     
  22. cobrian45

    cobrian45 Member

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    Thanks, all. This thread just cost me about $50.00. I went to the MHI site, read the sample chapter and ordered two copies, one for me and one for a friend. I've read Unintended Consequences, by the way. Great Book. I'm glad I'm supporting real gun owners and contributors instead of buying from someone that could use the money to take away something I hold dear.
     
  23. Bellevance

    Bellevance Member

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    THE FIFTH SEASON is a superb and suspenseful literary thriller written by a forum member! (Me.) Just read the reviews...

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0609606883/002-3369408-2869648?v=glance&n=283155&v=glance

    "I want to say that THE FIFTH SEASON is by far the best detective novel set in New England that I've read since Robert B. Parker's early Spenser novels. But there's a big difference between the two. Don Bredes sets his Hector Bellevance novels among the wild green hills of northern Vermont, in the small town of Tipton, hard by the Canadian border. Bredes's COLD COMFORT (2001) was the first book in what is shaping up to be a really fine series.

    Hector Bellevance is Tipton's compassionate and reluctant town constable. He's also an ex-Boston PD homicide detective and Crimson hoops star who, after some serious reversals in the big bad city, has left the force and returned to his tranquil Vermont birthplace to grow vegetables for the local farmer's market.

    This story begins on a Sunday at the height of mud season in April, the first morning in the previous 63 that it hasn't been snowing or raining. It's also Hector's 41st birthday, and as he walks around his farm in the early light opening his coldframes full of seedlings to the sun's rays, he feels completely content with his wholesome life. That doesn't last long. At noon, checking his messages, he learns that the town clerk wants him to serve a relief-from-abuse order on the crusty old town road foreman, Marcel Boisvert, a childhood friend of Hector's father. And Hector's girlfriend, Wilma, the number-one reporter for the local newspapaer, wants him to meet her in the high woods near the border, where the county sheriff has just found a headless, handless body. The sunny day, needless to say, quickly becomes a stressful and troubling one.

    Then, early the next morning, Hector finds the sheriff and the town clerk shot dead, and the road foreman has disappeared..."
     
  24. g.willikers

    g.willikers Member

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    The Weapon, by Michael Z. Williamson
    michaelzwilliamson.com
     
  25. ilbob

    ilbob Member

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    I have read most of his novels in the series. There is a fair amount of gun play, and some of it is pretty interesting, BUT the protagonist is almost a cartoon superhero with powers far exceeding any real human being. The gun play sometimes reads that way too.

    If you can get past how unrealistic much of the action and gun play really is, it is an interesting read. I have a hard time with stuff that just ain't real, and I kind of downgrade any fiction that fits in that category.

    I don't believe in the lone wolf super agent concept. Those people just do not exist.
     
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