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Observations on guns in Tajikistan

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by MatthewVanitas, Jun 29, 2007.

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  1. MatthewVanitas

    MatthewVanitas Member

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    I've done a couple of these threads for Iraq, Venezuela/Colombia, and Turkey, so here's the Tajik version.

    First, here's the wiki for Tajikistan, for those unfamiliar: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tajikistan


    1) There is a surprising lack of obviously armed personnel in this country. There are cops practically every block on the major street, but they only have flashlights or maybe a nightstick, and mainly stick to pulling cars over every two minutes. I've only seen one single armed man in the capital city, guarding a political building with an MP5. It's odd, because in westernized/secular/stable Turkey, there are armed men all over the place. I'll avoid speculation on this matter.

    2) I've chatted with various Tajiks about the 1990s Tajik Civil War which followed independence. One schoolteacher said that the "obryoz" [Russian word assimilated into Tajik] was extremely popular. The obryoz basically means "cut-around", and describes sawed-off hunting rifles and shotguns, or sometimes cut-down Moisin Nagants. Apparently people who didn't belong to the armed factions cut down hunting guns to carry for self-defense, or bought pistols on the black market.

    3) The gun laws are somewhat strict, and presumably patronage-related. Shotguns aren't too hard to get, rifles a fair bit harder, and pistols not usually accessible. Even a "gas pistol" requires a permit from the police.

    4) I dropped by one of Dushanbe's few gunshops, which is a section of a upscale clothing store. The gunshop also sells skinning knives, fishing gear, camping gear, etc.

    The primary stock was shotguns, in 12, 20, 28, and 410. Not a lot of ammo available, but a lot of reloading supplies, 25 dirhams (8c) per primer.

    Almost all the new shotguns were Turkish, ranging from US$600 to US$3,000. Prices were quoted to me in US$, not local Somoni, by a proprieter who didn't even speak Tajiki. IIRC, all shotguns were sXs, O/U or semi-auto, no pumps or bolts. Maybe (20) new shotguns in stock, evenly distributed between the various gauges, rather than 12ga-centric like the U.S.

    There was also a small used section, with some very tired-looking Russian shotguns. US$400 for a beater Baikal sXs, US$200 for a poor condition single-shot 12ga.

    There were also two Nagant carbines in stock. The proprieter wasn't too pleased about my asking, insisting in Russian "you need a permit from the Ministry for those." When I emphasized that I was just curious, he stated that it one was US$1100 (stock OK condition M38/44 with bayonet removed), and the other $1200 (sporterized M38/44, some parts nickel-plated, with a Dragunov flash-suppressor).

    So, those are my impressions so far. The issues of current military/security firearms are kind of touchy, so I can't really get into those. But if anyone has any other questions, I can try and ask some local friends.

    Oh, and a lot of the guys I know were translators for the USSR during the Afghan War, and had neat stories about the AKSU Krinkov. Interesting guys overall, also with great stories about drinking rubbing alcohol in Russian barracks in in Herat.

    Hope this brief summary proved interesting.
     
  2. Essex County

    Essex County Member

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    Interesting post! Could You give me a link to the Turkish post? I'm interested in what has changed in the last 40 years. Thanks Essex
     
  3. Beatnik

    Beatnik Member

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    Heck, I'm interested in all your other posts... particularly Iraq.
    I always found it odd that we tend to consider mankind's God-given, inalienable rights to be absent outside of the 50 states....
     
  4. Correia

    Correia Moderator Emeritus

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    I always find these interesting.
     
  5. Dravur

    Dravur Member

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    Wow

    Very interesting. Always refreshing to hear this kind of info from someone BTDT and has a first hand look at things.
     
  6. ceetee

    ceetee Member

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    I wonder how hard it is to get into the "Importing Mosins from the US into Tajikistan" business...




    j/k. At over a grand apiece profit, though... hmmmmm...
     
  7. MatthewVanitas

    MatthewVanitas Member

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    Minor update: after two weeks of being here, I finally saw someone with a real gun.

    Saw some folks doing guard for .gov buildings, with what appear to be AK-47s (not 74s) with old wooden stocks. Again, they're really keeping it on the down-low in this country.
     
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