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Oil finish or high gloss lacquer?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Mitchell Gard, Jan 29, 2012.

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  1. Mitchell Gard

    Mitchell Gard Member

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    Aside from looks what are the differences? Are either more protective? More or less durable? Which last longer? Whatever knowledge y'all have on the goods and bass of the two. Be mindful it will be on a rifle that gets used.
     
  2. Robtattoo

    Robtattoo Member

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    Oil finish for me, every time.

    Upsides - It protects the wood, it's non glare, it doesn't chip or flake & you can reapply as needed with a cloth & no hassle at all.

    Downsides - Doesn't protect from small dings & scratches, picks up dust & can be a pain to clean.

    I've had laquered & varnished guns in the past & I'm probably never going to have another.

    Upsides - Looks stunning if well done, protects the wood from minor scratches & bumps, easy to clean.

    Downsides - scuffs, scratches & chips easily, once chipped water will get under, lift it off & stain the wood, looks scruffy as soon as it chips, almost impossible to touch up & if needed will have to be completely stripped & re-done. Too shiny for my tastes & gets slippery in hot, humid weather.

    Just one man's opinion.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  3. helotaxi

    helotaxi Member

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    Make that two.
     
  4. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    What they said ^^^^
     
  5. RevGeo

    RevGeo Member

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    Oil for me too. When Weatherby rifles were first coming out it looked like the stock was dipped in molten plastic.
    Nothing like a hand rubbed oil finish, IMO. Protects the wood well and looks beautiful.

    George
     
  6. Murphys Law

    Murphys Law Member

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  7. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Me also.
     
  8. 788Ham

    788Ham Member

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    I like the oil finish also, BLO will do. If it gets to looking kind of hazy, get a double piece of burlap and buff it out.
     
  9. Salmoneye

    Salmoneye Member

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    Two coats of BLO worked fine for the government and umpteen million small arms for 100+ years...

    An old woodworker taught me BLO:

    One Coat A Day For A Week,
    One Coat A Week For A Month.
    One Coat A Month For A Year,
    One Coat A Year For A Lifetime,

    Works on fine furniture, and that is what I consider gunstocks to be...
     
  10. Fourbits

    Fourbits Member

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    Tung Oil

    I use Tung Oil. One Coat a day. Sand with 600 grit & boiled linseed oil between coats. Doesn't fill real well but gives a great looking finish.


    Fourbits
     
  11. edwin41

    edwin41 Member

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    hello
    some time ago i had a rolling block rifle and i had the stock sandblasted
    with some fine glassperl at a low pressure , wich came out very good.
    i then painted the stock 4 maby 5 times with high gloss laquer that one
    uses for wooden floors , so its very hard and not so sensitive to scratching.
    when its was dry i rubbed the whole stock with some scotchbrite , to the point were the shine was completly off .
    it was very goodlooking , and very , very durable and non scratching .
     
  12. Stealth01

    Stealth01 Member

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    This Cooper Varmint came with a drop dead gorgeous, satin oil finish! The stock is fantastic... Oh, so is the rest of the rifle!!

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Stealth01

    Stealth01 Member

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    This Cooper Varmint came with a drop dead gorgeous satin oil finish! The stock is fantastic... Oh, so is the rest of the rifle!!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. edwin41

    edwin41 Member

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    wow , that is a coincidence !
    the second picture is the gunrest im kind of duplicating....
    very nice rifle too !
     
  15. HKGuns

    HKGuns Member

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    Nice Kuerig!
     
  16. Jdillon

    Jdillon Member

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    Most finishes today are are either oils or polyurethane based. Polyurethane seals the wood better than oil from moisture but dings turn white and is difficult to do spot repairs and yellows and sometimes will alligator.

    Oils such as linseed and tung penetrate the wood, beautiful and easy to apply and repairs. Despite common beliefs, linseed oil, BLO or otherwise, tung oil will permit moisture to enter the pores of the wood and never completely dry.

    Polymerized tung oil varnish does an excellent job and will dry to a hard but flexible finish that will provide a high level of water resistance.

    I have been a woodworker for over 35 years and when finishing high end pieces, Polymerized tung oil finishes are my preference. BTW if your looking for high quality finishes, check a woodworking store and not the sporting goods store.

    That's my 2 cent contribution.
     
  17. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    I would suggest a gunsmith supply house such as Brownell's over either a sporting goods store or a woodworking store. One of my favorites is Brownell's Professional finish. It is a blend of oils and polyurethanes. It combines the best properties of both and one 8 oz can will do a LOT of stocks.
     
  18. 6x6pinz

    6x6pinz Member

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    boiled in linseed oil and pledge mix. lots of coats. The wood will thank you for many, many years. Can be reapplied as needed over the years.

    High gloss finishes seal the wood and will not allow it to breathe. The wood grain will move with varying humidities and temperatures causing the high gloss to either crack or separate. I know that the high gloss has a certain appeal but it requires much more attention to care when out of the safe.
     
  19. Freedom_fighter_in_IL

    Freedom_fighter_in_IL Member

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    Been doing higher end stocks for well over 25 years now and I have to agree with Jdillon here. Smiths, Sporting goods stores and the likes all do exactly what the "gun oil" suppliers do. They buy regular oil, slap some red dye in it, put it in tiny 2 ounce bottles, label it with anything saying GUN on it, sell it for 8 bucks a pop.

    When it comes to beautiful grain popping finishes as well as durable, well protected finishes, PTO (poly tung oil) sealer/varnish does an excellent job. Just finishing up a really nice English Walnut stock for a customer with it. It's all in the application though. You don't just sand it down, slap a few coats on it and you are done. There is a very delicate process of finishing sanding between coats to raise the grain and fill the pores. It takes me approximately 30 days to do a stock properly. It can be done in less time if it's just for a beater and you aren't that finicky. But if you want a beautiful, durable, eye popping finish, it will take a while to do it right.
     
  20. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    +1

    I use linseed oil on my mil-surps but any other wood is finished with PTO. PTO stabilizes the wood surface making it more resistant to dents and dings. Touch up is very quick and easy.
     
  21. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    This is true no matter what type of finish you use.
     
  22. 303tom

    303tom member

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    Oil...........
     
  23. 6x6pinz

    6x6pinz Member

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    I actually have a 410 shotgun stock that is in the final stages of sanding. I might have to give the PTO stuff a try. You never know sometimes they actually make things better than in the olden days.
     
  24. BrocLuno

    BrocLuno Member

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    The finish depends on the rifle. A older Remington or Browning deserves a high gloss finish as that's what they came with. I think (but am not sure?) that what is being referred to as polymerized Tung Oil is the same, or similar to, conversion varnish? If so, that's a pretty durable finish from a wear and tear standpoint.

    If starting with a bare wood stock (new, or refinish) I like to soak the wood with penetrating epoxy as a first coat if I'm not absolutely focused on color and figure. It adds a bit of yellow/gold to the final look. But it seals out water as well as anything. Then I use Tung Oil on top of that to build up the final look and feel. Usually about 10 to 20 coats wet sanded in between. You can rub oil to a high sheen, or buff it back to satin. And it's easy to touch up :)
     
  25. Mitchell Gard

    Mitchell Gard Member

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    Well this is a lot to take in, I'm leaning for the oils but as I can tell there is a Lot more into it than I originally thought. Seeing as though I'm going for a Sako 85 deluxe when I get back from deployment, what steps would I take upon purchase to preserve the stock? Does it come finished to an acceptable point or are more layers needed? And what would your suggestions be for learning more about the steps to doing all the stock work?
     
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