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On Not Re-chambering The Same Round Repeatedly...

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics and Training' started by Fred Fuller, Feb 6, 2012.

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  1. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    Many who carry semiautos have to clear them from time to time. And many reload the same round back on top of the magazine, so it gets run up into the chamber over and over.

    Sometimes this is not a good thing. For a couple of different reasons, depending on the firearm involved.

    Here we have the story of a BOOM... and sometimes there can be worse.

    http://oldnfo.blogspot.com/2012/01/negligent-discharge.html
    Negligent Discharge...
    ---------------------------

    http://firearms.stackexchange.com/q...ing-the-same-round-multiple-times-without-fir
    Is there any real danger in chambering the same round multiple times without firing it?
    ---------------
     
  2. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    It CAN happen with weapons that use a floating firing pin, but its still pretty unusual.

    You can rotate rounds each time (pain in the butt), or if you are using an AR with a forward assist, just ride the charging handle forward. It will strip the round from the mag and partially seat it in the chamber, then just use the forward assist to close it.

    If you hand load...be sure NOT to use sensitive primers (federal) in cartridges that are subject to FFP strikes.
     
  3. Shawn Dodson

    Shawn Dodson Member

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  4. Maia007

    Maia007 Member

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    Most enlightening. Now that I know, I will stop doing it. Thanks.
     
  5. Serenity

    Serenity Member

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    Thanks for another thing to check off the list of things that I didn't even know that I didn't know :banghead:

    :p
     
  6. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    Thanks, Shawn. I knew I'd seen another article on the subject recently but I couldn't remember where.
     
  7. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    Gah. Glad none of my rifles are subject to this, except maybe my PSL. Everything else has a return spring. I never thought about dented primers before, mainly because it simply was not an issue with anything I owned.

    Bullet setback is more commonly a problem than primer strikes, especially with the .40 S&W round. Even a slight bit of setback can result in significantly increased pressures, and possibly case rupture. It doesn't help that the most commonly used pistols in this caliber also have a chamber that doesn't fully support the case. These two design flaws, one with the ammunition, the other with the firearm, can result in disaster.
     
  8. firesky101

    firesky101 Member

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    I had my M1 carbine jam up so bad I could not get the mag out once. So after pulling all the pieces of primer and brass out of the action (those suckers are tougher than you think they would be), I cycled the action till the all they shells were on the ground. I noticed every one had a dent on the primer:what:. So a good stripping and spring kit went into that one. BTW the mag failure was due to a piece of brass in the magwell.
     
  9. Dnaltrop

    Dnaltrop Member

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    Checked the top round in my M&P, was a visible difference between it and a fresh-from-the-box round. I'll pull the round and keep the nickeled brass.

    I really need to invest in calipers, but the setback from repeatedly making safe, and chambering a round over a few months is readily apparent to the naked eye.
     
  10. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    Well, we're talking about several issues here, it seems.

    1) "Slam" fires caused by stuck or overly energetic floating fireing pins. This is a big problem if it happens, but clean guns usually don't do that.

    2) Bullet set-back. This is a sneaky issue. I've seen plenty of daily carry rounds start to exhibit very noticable setback after some number of chamberings. How much is too much? Hard to say. But in effect you're seating the bullet in too deep. Handloaders know why you don't want to do that. Doing it to a higher-pressure cartridge (.40 S&W?) might be a real bad thing.
     
  11. Husker_Fan

    Husker_Fan Member

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    Bullet set back is the issue I concern myself with. I put the chambered round back in the top of the magazine no more than 4 or 5 times. After that, the round goes in my range bag and is shot during my next practice session and a fresh round replaces it in the magazine.
     
  12. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    I rechambered 9mm, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP rounds multible times. The guns used were a Hi Power, XD-40, and a SW1911. 9mm was chambered the most because the bullet wasn't setting back what so ever but .40 S&W and .45 ACP got set back easily. I do reuse the same round in my XD when rechambering but I ride the slide so hardly any force is put on the bullet or I drop the round in the chambered and tilt the gun so the round goes under the extractor. Doing it that way versus dropping the slide allows you to reuse the same round safely with no set back.
     
  13. archigos

    archigos Member

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    Lee,
    Thank you for the insight. I've always ejected the chambered round at the end of the day and I suppose I need to stop that habit. However, this discussion raises another issue that I've never seen conclusively answered on here, though I've seen it discussed about a thousand times. When I disarm, should I just be leaving the round in the chamber with the magazine in? Or should I be leaving the round in the chamber, eject the magazine, and empty it? I know that leaving a magazine doesn't "weaken" it, but does the spring gradually adjust over time to its compressed position? Sorry to derail the topic a little but I think its relevant - if there's a better place I should be looking please let me know.
     
  14. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    When I disarm, should I just be leaving the round in the chamber with the magazine in?

    The answer starts as usual - it depends. :D But safety first! Firmly establishing good habits are the best bet. Being fully present in the moment, being mindful of what you're doing, is an absolute necessity when handling a loaded gun.

    I'm one of those who believes that the less fiddling with a loaded carry gun, the better. I leave my carry gun loaded and in the holster (a pocket holster in my case) except when it's being practiced with empty (draw, dryfire etc) or cleaned. When I have to remove the gun to go into criminal assistance zones where I can't legally carry, I leave it in a secure place, loaded, in its holster. Likewise when I change pants etc. the gun stays in the holster, loaded. At night the pants I wore that day hang on a handy doorknob, complete with holstered carry gun. There are no children in our home, just the two of us, and my wife has her own handgun.

    I carry a revolver, but when I last carried a semi my habits were much the same. You need to do whatever best meets your needs while maximizing safety and minimizing the chances of an unintended discharge.
     
  15. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    When I was working Complex security, the ammunition for the off going staff and on coming staff had to be visually verified, magazines emptied into ammo trays for counting. This is three times a day. This resulted in visible setback on a regular basis, and we would pull the offending rounds and replace them as soon as they were noticed. The bad rounds were turned over to the Armorer for disposal.
     
  16. Shawn Dodson

    Shawn Dodson Member

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    I don't load/unload very often.

    All my defense pistols are loaded, unless they don't need to be loaded (such as for cleaning, maintenance, dry-fire training or any other reason). When I unholster the pistol(s) go directly into the gun safe or lock box.

    When I jock up for CCW I simply perform a battle readiness check (chamber check and verify magazine is loaded to full capacity) and holster.

    The practice eliminates needless loading/unloading.
     
  17. newbuckeye

    newbuckeye Member

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    I do exactly as Mr. Lapin does. Leave 'er loaded!
     
  18. jawman

    jawman Member

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    Does this danger only apply to semi auto rifles or can it also happen to semi auto pistols? Ie, could this happen to my 9mm p226?
     
  19. Fred Fuller

    Fred Fuller Moderator Emeritus

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    Setback of the bullet can happen in pistols as well, in some cases. Check your top round alongside a round that has not been chambered repeatedly, and note any difference in overall length of the round that has been chambered often.
     
  20. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    As I said, I've seen plenty of daily carry rounds start to exhibit very noticable setback after some number of chamberings. How much is too much? Hard to say. But in effect you're seating the bullet in too deep. Handloaders know why you don't want to do that. Doing it to a higher-pressure cartridge (.40 S&W?) might be a real bad thing.

    Some microscopic amount of setback from a few re-chamberings is probably no big deal. But once the bullet starts to get loose, it can rapidly go from bad to worse. I've seen carry ammo that was set-back far enough that it could be quite easily seen with the naked eye.
     
  21. newbuckeye

    newbuckeye Member

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    I remember one 9mm from when I was a LEO that looked more like a .380. A buddy was carrying it and was going to shoot it as part of our Qual requirement (had to shoot our duty ammo). The range OIC took it from him and framed it.
     
  22. colorado_handgunner

    colorado_handgunner Member

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    This is worth bringing up again, I think.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
     
  23. ChCx2744

    ChCx2744 Member

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    I mark the base of the casing with a sharpie. If I load a round once and jack it out, I mark a line near the base of the casing. Once a round has 2 hash marks, I rotate a new round into the chamber and the marked one to the bottom. Once all my rounds have 2 hash marks, I shoot them. This actually makes carry ammo last a long time, about a year. I figure chambering the same round twice won't hurt it much, but to be safe I'm keeping the limit at 2.

    I try not to load and unload unless I'm cleaning or going to the range. Otherwise, I also like to keep it loaded and leave it alone.
     
  24. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Those of you who carry revolvers are invited to make faces at us here.. like this one. :neener:
     
  25. Sour Kraut

    Sour Kraut Member

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    ^^^ I like this procedure, and do it as well...
     
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