Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Orange Clean Oven Cleaner for Stocks?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Badger Arms, Mar 30, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Badger Arms

    Badger Arms Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    3,738
    Location:
    Harnett County, NC
    Here goes. I want to try that Orange Clean oven cleaner I see at the supermarket to strip and degrease a stock. Has anybody else done this and what were the results? I've tried Easy-Off but it darkened the wood on my $50 gun. The furniture stripper I bought works great but is thin and emits noxious fumes.
     
  2. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,121
    I've been seeing a large number of stock stripping/degreasing methods using various oven cleaners, liquid cleaners like Simply Green, and even running the stock in the dishwasher, etc.

    The problem I have with these is that whatever you put on wood soaks into the wood. Later it tends to leech OUT of the wood.
    Sometimes this takes time.

    The problem is, all these chemicals may not leech out until AFTER you've finished the stock and put it back on the rifle. I have seen rifles with corroded, and pitted metal under the wood line caused by "expedient" stock cleaning methods.

    Stock wood is kiln dried before being made into a stock, and the idea of applying finish is to prevent the stock from absorbing moisture. With most of these methods, the stock is washed down with water, some of which is absorbed into the stock. This can cause warping, and swelling of the wood.

    Because I just don't trust expedient methods on a good stock, I tend to stick to the old proven methods of a solvent-based stripper like Formby's which evaporates completely, and a degreaser method like the use of "whiting".

    Both the solvent stripper and the Whiting method have been used for a great many years without damaging the wood.
    Since I can't say the same of the expedient methods, I just can't recommend them.

    It's entirely possible these new methods may work without damage to the wood, but I tend not to trust excessive moisture and harse chemicals on a good piece of wood.
     
  3. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2002
    Messages:
    4,394
    Location:
    Southeastern US
    That orange stuff is really good. Try it!

    FWIW, I just stripped a Garand with Simple Green a few nights ago. It worked really well but almost put me on the floor once, even with good ventilation. I didn't have to use a lot of it so I dont' expect much of a leeching problem.
     
  4. MiniZ

    MiniZ Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    427
    Location:
    UT
    I have been using a product called Citristrip on riflestocks with great results.

    It works a little slower than most, but it has a nice orange scent, and isn't harsh on the skin if you get it on yourself.

    I usually strip them, use a stripper wash to remove any residue, and wait a week before sanding/refinishing.
     
  5. Erich

    Erich Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,928
    Location:
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    I've used Easy Off and Citrustrip - Citrustrip (avail. at Wally World) is the way to go.

    Always wear gloves!
     
  6. Bottom Gun

    Bottom Gun Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    774
    Location:
    Elgin, Arizona
    I've had good luck using lacquer thinner to leach oil and grease out of stocks once you have the finish off. I've used Acetone as well, but I prefer the lacquer thinner.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page