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Oxidized Lead

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Red Label, Jan 21, 2003.

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  1. Red Label

    Red Label Member

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    I had about 50# of shot under my loading bench last spring when I got a bit of water in the basement and of course when it dried I ended up with a lot of powdery shot. Well, it looked OK to shoot so I have continued to load it. Then I read somewhere that it was hard on your gun so decided to search the web for some info. OK, here is the scary part. Oxidized lead is extremely hazardous as it can be breathed readily and of course enter the bloodstream. It sure does make a nice cloud of dust when you pour it into the shot bottle. I've only got 25# left! I think I will be taking it outside to dump it:eek: Hope no-one else has been as ignorant as I have been:uhoh:
     
  2. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    Do NOT dump it outside!

    You can get your fanny thrown in jail.
     
  3. Rottweiler

    Rottweiler Member

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    I agree with Mike. Don't dump it. Give it to a buddy who casts bullets. He'll most likely be happy to add it to his stash of lead. Shot is a great source of antimony, the stuff that makes a cast bullet hard.
     
  4. Southla1

    Southla1 Member In Memoriam

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    I cannot tell you what to do but if it was me I would just put on one of those paint masks they sell at Wal Mart 3 for a dollar and load and shoot the shot.

    I have messed with lead all my life, loading, shooting, casting, you name it I have done it. Not to mention the fact that I worked for a couple of years at a newspaper that used the "hot metal" printing process. This process is totally melted lead (linotype).

    Each year one of the things the company was required to do was monitor the blood lead level in us along with hearing tests, lung tests etc. MY lead level was always below the threshold.

    I don't see a bit of difference between dumping it outside by turning the bag upside down, or dumping it outside from a .725 tube at 1300 FPS.
     
  5. Mike Irwin

    Mike Irwin Member

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    "I would just put on one of those paint masks they sell at Wal Mart 3 for a dollar and load and shoot the shot."

    And possibly end up with lead poisoning as a result, Carlyle.

    When you're dealing with lead oxide, you need a filter mask of a type that will handle PbO/PbO2.
     
  6. Frohickey

    Frohickey Member

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    When you have broken eggs, make an omelette.

    When you have oxidized lead shot, make cast bullets. :D
     
  7. Lloyd Smale

    Lloyd Smale Member

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    this stuff is extremely dangerous you should imediately package it up and send it to me for disposal:D
     
  8. Quantrill

    Quantrill Member

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    What about that reclaimed lead shot that some trap clubs gather and resell? It is mixed sizes but primarily smaller size. If it has been sitting out in the weather for months or years, wouldn't that be oxidized as well? Yet I know that a lot of trap shooting folk buy this stuff and reload it for practice. Quantrill
     
  9. Archie

    Archie Member

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    Issue of paint masks.

    Mike Irwin brought up the advisability of using paint masks for protection against lead oxide inhalation problems. From a California Air Resources Board decision of April 24, 1997:

    Particles less than 10 micrometers in size are of health concern because of their ability to bypass the body's natural defense systems and their potential for long residence time in the lung. Although particles greater than 10 micrometers may not be respirable, they are also of health concern because they may be inhaled and swallowed or can deposit on food or water which could ultimately lead to ingestion.

    So... check out the labelling and see if the mask will filter particles less than 10 micrometers. A federal test result showed .3 micrometers as being the smallest aerosol particulate testable, so lead has to be somewhat bigger. A mask that filters down to 3 micrometers will probably stop the bulk of lead oxide.

    I checked a couple of industrial and safety websites regarding lead oxide. One suggested using "...gloves and dust masks" (without further specs); another recommended "adequate ventilation".

    I checked the OSHA website. Other than a passing reference to respirators, no specifics were given.

    Other safety proceedures were: No eating, drinking or smoking while handling any lead products. Wash well after exposure and before eating, drinking, etc. Launder clothing.
     
  10. Southla1

    Southla1 Member In Memoriam

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    we used to have tons of the block lead sitting on some of our offshore platforms. We melted it and used it as buffers in welded pipe fittings to try to alleviate some erosion in high flow rate gas wells. Stuff sat in an exposed store room and had the prettiest gray coating on it from exposure to sea water. We handled it all the time and as I mentioned we were "bled" for med purposes each year and lead was one thing we were tested for...........this because some of the older facilities had lead based paint on them. Mine was always very low and if anything is should have been higher than any other employees because of my off duty hobbies...................casting, reloading, shooting etc.
     
  11. braindead0

    braindead0 Member

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    Same with my Dad, 30plus years casting and working on printing presses... He had my brother and I tested one year (as well as his usual) when he read an article making some outrageous claims about lead poisoning... all of us had levels that were very low..

    I have a feeling that the medical establishment..doesn't have a clue (imagine that). :D
     
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