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Parkerized or Duracoat?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by viking499, Jan 7, 2010.

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  1. viking499

    viking499 Member

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    Which of the two is better on a 1911? Why?
     
  2. jaysouth

    jaysouth Member

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    both. Park then duracoat over the top of that. you will get a durable non reflective finish.
     
  3. CWL

    CWL Member

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    Yup, the way to go is parkerize then duracoat. I get this done on my customs.

    The park' helps the duracoat stay on better.
     
  4. viking499

    viking499 Member

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    How does the duracoat hold up? Is that what RIA is doing with theirs?
     
  5. jaysouth

    jaysouth Member

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    I once had two norincos. One had duracote sprayed on it an set up to cure for a couple of days. The other was parkerized by a professional gunsmith, then sprayed with duracote from an air brush and cured according to Brownell's directions. The finish on the one done by the amateur(me) looked real good for about 4 weeks. Then most of the duracoat wore off on contact points. The one done by the professional is over a year old and has been holstered and drawn thousands of times. Wear is apparent on the high points, but it still looks good overall.

    You will only get a very dark matte finish with the park/duracoat method. Which is very 'tactical' I am told, but is very durable and practical.
     
  6. jaysouth

    jaysouth Member

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    Professionally done Nork

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    I Duracoated over the parkerizing on my Springfield 1911 when I did some recontouring. I don't care for the look, actually (too plastic looking), the bare parkerizing is much more aesthetic, but, the double treatment finish is fairly durable.

    However (again) a couple of years of competition use has worn through the finish at the edges and high points.

    It is durable, but it won't look great forever if you use it much.

    -Sam
     
  8. CWL

    CWL Member

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    Yes, but this is true for everything including hard chrome, boron nitride, ceramics, etc.

    Wear and tear is going to happen if you are planning on carrying the pistol, it adds character to your gun.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2010
  9. cooks 7

    cooks 7 Member

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    I have Duracoated lots of things to date, from entire guns, magazines, parts, ect. I like the system a lot and have had good luck with it. Like was said before the optimal combination is parkerize then Duracoat, if i had to choose just one i'd go Duracoat. I have had parkerized things rust on me before, just from fingerprints and time, I don't worry about leaving fingerprints on Duracoated items, it's like a good paint job it will seal out any moisture/oxygen so rust shouldn't be an issue.
    I prefer the look of Duracoated items as well, sometimes parkerizing makes things look cheap to me.
     
  10. CWL

    CWL Member

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    Parkerizing is very old technology and doesn't do a good job at corrosion resistance. It just happens to be pebbly in texture and helps to hold oil in place better than a smooth surface.

    This same pebbly texture is why duracoat will stay on better.
     
  11. nalioth

    nalioth Member

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    Here I come with my two cents - duracoat (or any fancy-coat) is the perfect topping to a freshly parkerized gun.


    You duracoat w/o the park, it can exhibit chipping or other unwanted effects. .
     
  12. doc540

    doc540 Member

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    DuraCoat's easy to touch up.
     
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