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Pedersoli Sharps

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by frosty, Oct 26, 2008.

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  1. frosty

    frosty Member

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    I recently aquired a pedersoli sharps hunter at cabelas. It comes in around 10+ lbs, maybe 2lb less of a target rifle. I have owned several bpcr's, but one problem I have encountered is cleaning the rifle, because of the tang sight. I installed a mid range creedmoore sight, and now cleaning the gun from the breech end is virtually impossible. If the sight had dowels, it could be removed for cleaning without losing zero. It seams awfully inconvenient to have to remove the sight every time. I want to clean the rifle from the breech end, where it is safest with the proper rod...Can anyone shed some light on this?
     
  2. gizamo

    gizamo Member

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    I have a couple of Pedersoli's with the Creedmore and Soule sights. I clean from the muzzle end with no problems. Bore guide and a little care and they have always been fine....I just take my time...

    Giz
     
  3. alemonkey

    alemonkey Member

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    On mine I flip the sight backwards to rest against the stock, with a patch between the sight and stock to prevent scratching. works like a charm. I use a regular 1 piece steel rod coated in some sort of rubbery stuff to prevent wear.
     
  4. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    Would using a bore snake instead of a rod work? Make your own out of weed whacker line. Melt and shape one end like a jag.
     
  5. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I don't know what brand of sight you are using, but the guns I see at BPCR have tang sights that fold back far enough to clear the line of the bore. My Winchester + Baldwin is easy to clean from the breech, as are my friends' Shiloh + MVA and Browning + Browning.
     
  6. fineredmist

    fineredmist Member

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    I have the same problem with those sights on my High Walls. My solution is simple, insert a fired case into the chamber, close the action, place the rifle upside down in the cleaning rest and clean from the muzzel using a guide on the rod. The case will catch the crud, allow the brush to change direction and by inverting the rifle any cleaning solution that does make it pass the case will not go down into the action.
    Works for me.
     
  7. English Bob

    English Bob Member

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    Seems special to Pedersoli...a tang sight which folds forwards into the breech! Whey they make them like this is beyond me.

    When I originally used a Pedersoli sight of this 'fold-forward' type I just left the fired cartridge in in the chamber and cleaned from the muzzle.

    I eventually got sick of cleaning it this way and changed out the sight for a Riflesmith.....these fold the correct way and allow cleaning from the breech end with no problems.
     
  8. Elbert P . Suggins

    Elbert P . Suggins Member

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    I had the exact same problem with my Italian Sharps with the tang sight. In fact with mine you had to screw the windage adjustment over to the left about a quarter inch just so you could clear the hammer and lay it down forward and hope you got your sight adjusted correctly when you flipped it back and reset it. I finally took the thing off and just use the rear ladder sight that came on it. Quigley's flipped backward, I can't understand why they made these to go the other way. Mine is boxed up and I can't remember the brand, but I know it was about $150.
     
  9. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    You can get a brass muzzle protector, also, while you're looking for a long-term solution. They're inexpensive, and they work great on big-bore guns.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.buffaloarms.com/browse.cfm/4,2121.html

    WRT a boresnake, there are a few issues here.

    If you shoot BP, you will get a LOT of fouling. I'm not sure what the boresnake would look like after a couple passes! Furthermore, with BP, you have to get the bore squeaky-clean, since BP left in the bore is corrosive.

    The barrel of the gun in question gets leaded-up FAST. I took one hunting, and we shot a few rounds at steel plates after we set up camp, to make sure our guns and our shooting skills had survived the 1500 mile drive. Afterwards, I got a bunch of lead out of the barrel. Expect to clean the lead out whenever you shoot it with cast bullets; otherwise it will shoot like crap.

    Xylene and tight wads of paper towel rammed through the bore take care of this. Can't think of how a boresnake could do the job. A strong, stiff cleaning rod is the only way to go.
     
  10. Gewehr98

    Gewehr98 Member

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    My Sharps' tang sight folds clear of the bore axis...

    I have the 3" Creedmoor rear sight, but it folds down to the rear just fine when cleaning. I use a leather rear sight boot when it's folded back against the comb, just in case.

    Sight raised:

    olderbetter.gif

    Sight folded, with boot:

    creedmoorbootsharps.gif

    That leather sight boot is also quite handy for protecting one's face from recoil when using the barrel-mounted tangent sights!
     
  11. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Nice sounder, Gewehr.
     
  12. Gewehr98

    Gewehr98 Member

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    AB, I just noticed your mention of a leading problem...

    I had the same thing occur for a while in the last couple inches of the above rifle's 32" barrel, until I switched to a bullet design with more and deeper lube grooves. The problem disappeared nicely once I did that.

    There's a quick way to check if you're running a BPCR - just look at the muzzle after firing a round or two. The theory is that unless you have a pronounced lube star at the muzzle, you're running out of bullet lube around the 28" mark, leaving bare lead to travel by itself down the remaining barrel length.

    An under-bullet grease cookie would be another way to fix things, if you're already set on a given bullet design.

    I'll go with having too much lube and a greasy wet muzzle over getting lead fouling out of a 32" barrel any day. :D

    The antique telegraph sounder is actually functional. It's wired into a lightning RF detector circuit, and clatters when thunderstorms are approaching.
     
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