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Period Pipes for Black Powder Shooters

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by DixieTexian, Aug 22, 2008.

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  1. DixieTexian

    DixieTexian Member

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    This may not be considered an appropriate discussion for the forum,and if it is feel free to lock it. However, I am sure there are at least a few pipe smokers here, and what better compliment to blackpowder shooting than a historically accurate pipe? Of course, we should all realize that smoking anything while dealing with black powder is a recipe for disaster. That said, I have done some searching, and haven't really found much info on pipes from those periods in history. All I know is clay pipes are often recovered from civil war sites, but how long is a wodden pipe going to last buried anyhow? Anybody have an other info?
     
  2. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    I have a wood pipe and case from the 1840's according to the engraving on it. It was presented to a gentleman on his anniversary. I did a on-line search years ago, but couldn't find much on old wood pipes. That may have changed.
     
  3. sundance44s

    sundance44s Member

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    The clay pipes are probally the most common for the period ..Clay pipes came with a long shaft that could be broken off when offering a friend a smoke ..they did this to keep from passing diseases to each other ..smart idea ..diseases were takeing a toll .DixieGunWorks sells the clay pipes for a modest price ..I have one in a Civil War Period display I made .
     
  4. bigbadgun

    bigbadgun Member

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    Um not really sure however.
    I would think that a corncob pipe or a clay pipe would be very period.
    Again not 100% sure as I am not a pipe smoker I smoke cigars.
     
  5. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    Track of the Wolf has some clay pipes.
     
  6. Bezoar

    Bezoar member

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    first off here everyone,

    the normal pipe for that time period was clay. wood pipes were starting to become mainstream in europe at the time. so i dont doubt an officer of some sort would have a wood pipe. sailors probably a wood pipe.

    the "official" ruling in the pipe world is that wood pipes didnt become normally found or mainstream in amercia until the civil war was over. so i say smoke a wood pipe if ya want.
    corncob to as well. everybody knows that the missuiri meerschaum company only got started because a gentleman started selling premade corn cob pipes.
     
  7. Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave Member

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    Well it does depend on the period. For the American War for Independence, and prior, a clay pipe with a clay stem, one piece, is correct, on up to the beginning of the 19th century. Clay pipes are documented in the 17th century, following the arrival of tobacco in Europe. (There appears to be some truth to the story that clay pipes appeared as clay was the cheapest material from which to make the pipe, AND with pipes being cheap..., the use of tobacco could then spread, and the market would then expand...., ) Carving wood pipes took time and they cost alot more.

    After 1800, clay bowls with reed stems began to appear, as did the use of soapstone for the bowl with a reed stem. Corn cobs of course could've always been used with a reed stem, but you want to convert a realy small corncob pipe to a reed stem to get a correct size bowl (the really large corncob pipes found today are from hybrid corn). As the Civil War approached, the wood and/or briar pipes began to become the norm. Meerschaum also appeared in Europe at the beginning of the 18th century, for the very rich.

    LD
     
  8. mgregg85

    mgregg85 Member

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    Go for the corn cob.
     
  9. hooey

    hooey Member

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    Pipes!

    What a great subject! I too have enjoyed smoking pipes for 20 or so years. If you want to enjoy a good wood (burl) pipe that is somewhat period correct try a Peterson pipe. They are made in Ireland and are relatively inexpensive. I am quite surprised at how many of these pipes I see in western movies...look at what "Angel Eyes" smokes in "The Good The Bad And The Ugly". The Peterson company dates back to 1865 and by 1870 or so the pipes were being imported to the States. Peterson makes the "system" pipe that smokes cool...I have and enjoy several of these pipes.
     
  10. scrat

    scrat Member

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    pipes

    corn cobb

    though i have never smoked a pipe
     
  11. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Clays really are the historically accurate pipes, and actually smoke wonderfully as well -- provided you have the right one. Cheap clays meant more for tourists than smokers are made with a slurry and smoke terribly. Pipes made with proper pipe clay tend to smoke delightfully, but they do have their own difficulties. The bowl gets too hot to touch, so must be handled by the stem (there is a special grip!) and all clays are quite fragile, of course.

    I am lucky enough to have a couple of pipes from Stephen Bray of Old World Fine Clays, sadly long out of business. They are my finest smoking pipes; better than even my most expensive briars.
     
  12. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Clay pipes for French & Indian, Revolution. They could be shared as men broke off the tip before using it. I don't know when pipes became more personal to people. Check out the paintings in museums.
     
  13. DixieTexian

    DixieTexian Member

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    Didn't Missouri Meerschuam have to breed corn with larger cobs because the selective breeding of corn up to that point was to make the smallest cob possible so that the actual corn production would be maximized? If this is true, then what would be the most accurate size for a historic corn cob? Somewhere in between? Also, anybody know where there is any information available on how to make a period accurate corn cob? The modern ones have those plastic stems that can't be accurate. They are great for fishing or some activity where you might easily lose a pipe, but I wouldn't think they are very accurate.

    As far as Peterson Pipes go, I am in the process of breaking in a Peterson System Pipe (it smokes better than any pipe I have ever had, hands down). So that is accurate for the later 1800's maybe? Good to know.

    Since we are on the subject of historical pipes, we might as well discuss the tobacco that goes in them...
     
  14. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

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    When I was reinacting, I would take a corn cob and fit it with a reed stem.

    Some of the guys used clay stems, usually after it broke of the clay pipe.

    I also smoked clays but would make a wood box to store them in.

    Both were good smokes.

    Remember to hold the clay by the stem, not the bowl.
     
  15. BattleChimp Potemkin

    BattleChimp Potemkin Member

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    For the more "cultured" smoker/shooter, a Hans Christian Anderson is wonderful. It comes with not only the Churchwarden bit, but also a short bit, as well as a military bit holder. Cant go wrong, but the time period may be more Victorian age, rather than Revolutionary.
     
  16. hooey

    hooey Member

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    Tobacco

    Well, smoke what you like and enjoy, however, there probably weren't any aromatics around at the time so I would venture to say that cured virginias were popular and perhaps some english blends. The former are tobaccos without the additives that give aromatics the sweet smell and taste. I prefer an aged virginia which is naturally sweet because it produces it's own sugars when curing.
     
  17. RonSC

    RonSC Member

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    I've been an avid pipe smoker for app ox 45 yrs. Clay pipes were a mainstay in Europe before settlers arrived in North America, as they were easily manufactured, inexpensive to produce and essentially cheap enough to be affordable and basically disposable... Tobacco in Europe was horrendously expensive and largely only affordable occasionally to everyday folks. Most wooden, briar, cherry pipes that came on the scene during the early settlements were of traditional ethnic European shapes, of centuries-old design.
    Bents of many varieties were preferred choice of those early artisans and craftsmen ie; printers, watchmakers, gunsmths, silversmiths as they were (unlike straight-stem clay pipes) a hands-free design that did could be held in the teeth yet not interfere with on close-up work. A reed or bone-stem cherry pipe would be a good choice for a re-enactor as these were a widely available and often a home made variety.
    http://www.rusticgirls.com/make-your-own-tobacco-pipe.html
     
  18. DixieTexian

    DixieTexian Member

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    They had Perique back then, right? I just discovered that wonderfull stuff.:D
     
  19. hooey

    hooey Member

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    Too much of that perique makes my hands sweat; then I can't hold my pistols!
     
  20. scrat

    scrat Member

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    sorry had to do it
    [​IMG]
     
  21. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Man's got a point.
     
  22. Loyalist Dave

    Loyalist Dave Member

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    Go to the local pipe store, and get one of the small corncob pipes with about a 2" stem...., the kind that are sold for "tobacco use" but we all know what they are really used for...., cut off the wood & plastic stem at the cob, leaving a bit of the glued in wooden stem in the cob. Next, take the awl-blade from a Swiss Army knife (or an exacto knife) and carve out the center of the wooden stem remaining in the cob until the reed stem will fit. Fill, light, smoke.

    LD
     
  23. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    The Pipe Forum over at EOTAC would love this topic! I just started smoking a pipe late last year. FAR better tase and aroma, couldn't ditch the cigarrettes fast enough. Two billiards, one bulldog, and a handsome bent apple, love it. Captain Black is OK, but Benjamin Hartwell's Evening Stroll is the best, and based on a very old recipe, might be period correct...
     
  24. oneshooter

    oneshooter Member

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  25. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Captain Black... Like Glocks and blackpowder substitutes... friends don't let friends smoke Captain Black. :neener:

    If you simply must smoke an aromatic, McLellan's Captain Cool at least tastes like tobacco. A can of this should prepare you for a "transitional" blend like Frog Morton on the Town, and from there it's a short hop to 965!
     
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