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Pietta 1858 New Army Police .36

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Bluehawk, Apr 1, 2010.

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  1. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    Some time back I posted I had my Remington "fix" by owning a beautiful Pietta Spiller&Burr revolver. Well...I lied!!!! I was looking at Cabela's online today and saw the 1858 New Army Police Model and liked it very much but didn't want to pay the $269.99 price tag but needed some new nipples for the Spiller&Burr as well as internal parts offered for the Remingtons. Not sure if the Remington parts were compatible with the S&B, I called Cabela's and spoke to Andy, a sales associate, (extension 7539) and spoke with him about it. During that conversation the New Army came up and I related the price to him and told him to convince me to buy it but not at the going price!!!!! He looked it up and found it was actually $239.99 in the CATALOG as opposed to the Internet price!!!!
    Needless to say...I bought it...for $30 less than the price on the Internet! :neener:
    How's that for a deal???????
    Next time you see something you want from Cabela's...call and ask for Andy!!!!!!!!!!
     

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2010
  2. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    Good score, I need one of those .36 Remingtons myself.
     
  3. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    I have two...of course!
     
  4. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    BHP...please tell us your experience with it and what can I look forward to!
     
  5. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    The Remington arrived on Tuesday and it's beautiful...wood to metal fit is excellent and the blueing is a deep black w/o any blemishes! Mechanically it's nice and tight and indexes perfectly.
    What I don't understand is Piettas powder maximum...12 grains??
    That was what they said for my Spiller & Burr and I figured that was because it was a brass frame...but for a steel frame revolver that seems like a very anemic powder charge. Anyone have any experience with these Remingtons?
     
  6. arcticap

    arcticap Member

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    Those recommended volumes are written by lawyers for product liabilty reasons.
    The Traditions manual recommends loading 2-30 grains of fffg with round balls and 19-25 grains of fffg with conicals.
    But in reality it's safe to load as much powder into the chamber as it can hold.
    But please don't sue me over it! :D

    http://www.traditionsfirearms.com/eshop/products/CAP BALL REVOLVER INFO 2.pdf
     
  7. TomADC

    TomADC Member

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    I have a pair of .36 cal consecutive serial # and one .44 cal :D
     
  8. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    Tom are they Pietta's ...if so how do they shoot and what is your impression of them?
     
  9. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    [​IMG]
    This gun was made in 1981, so it's an entirely different generation than your new gun. It's one of the first ones I bought; it was new at the time. I bought the .36 to go with my .36 Uberti 1861 Colt Navy. It refelected the typical Pietta fit/finish problems of the time, but it shoots very well. It does have the .44 New Army grip so it's not a true replica but the difference is not great. The most accurate load is 25 gr by volume fffg real black powder with a lubed felt wad; your gun will probably vary from that by as much as 5 gr.
     
  10. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    One or two things I don't understand is why they call these the 1858 New Army when the New Army's were introduced around 1863 or so and the .36 calibers were Navy models...not Army...so why are they calling the .36's Army models?? I'm confused...as always! :banghead:
     
  11. andrewstorm

    andrewstorm member

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    why daddy why

    Its marketing my good man, marketing it has nothing to do with reality.:cool:
     
  12. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    .36's are not Navy calibers. The use of the term Navy to describe .36 caliber c&b revolvers is a modern development. The Navy didn't use or issue revolvers - they used single shot pistols.
     
  13. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    Mykeal please don't hate me for the following:

    Samuel Colt designed the Colt Revolving Belt Pistol of Naval Caliber (i.e., .36 cal) between 1847 and 1850 - the actual year of introduction. It remained in production until 1873, when revolvers using fixed cartridges came into widespread use. Total production numbers were exceeded only by the Colt Pocket models in concurrent development, and numbered some 250,000 domestic units and about 22,000 produced in the Colt London Armory. (Wilson, 1985)

    The designation "Colt 1851 Navy" was applied by collectors, though the popular name "Navy Revolver" is of early origin, as the gun was frequently called the "Colt Revolving Belt Pistol of Naval Caliber." (ibid, Wilson) The cylinder was engraved with a scene of the victory of the Second Texas Navy at the Battle of Campeche in May 16, 1843. The Texas Navy had purchased the earlier Colt Paterson Revolver, but this was Colt's first major success in the gun trade; the naval theme of the engraved cylinder of the Colt 1851 Navy revolver was Colt's gesture of appreciation. Despite the "Navy" designation, the revolver was chiefly purchased by civilians and military land forces(ibid Wilson 1985).
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010
  14. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    Please do me the favor of not assuming my emotions in advance.

    The US Navy never purchased, issued or used .36 caliber revolvers, as your reference (Wilson) implies. The Texas Navy purchase was not 'Navy caliber' revolvers but simply Colt revolvers, the only ones they were manufacturing. Wilson's statement is modern; the 'naval caliber' designation is not Colt's nor is it contemporary with the manufacture of the revolvers.
     
  15. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    I believe the .36 Remington has the best balance and ''feel'' of all the black powder revolvers.they're heavy for their size,due to the small hole down the barrel and chambers, which makes a steady shooting platform.the slightly shorter barrel on the Pietta .36's make them quick out of the holster,and they compare well with Colt's classic ''Peacemaker''.
     
  16. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    In 1893, a man by the name of George Blow, an Ensign in the US Navy, applied for a patent for a revolver he designed. In the text of his patent he mentions a "Colt navy revolver" and further on states: "In the old pattern of revolver as furnished to the navy..."

    Patent No. 514696 Filing Date: Jan 31, 1893 Issue Date: Feb. 13. 1894

    I would think, based on this man's first hand knowledge of that period, that the term navy revolver is not a modern term and based on his account, revolvers were issued to the US Navy during this time period.
    This info from the patent came direct from the US Patent Office online.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2010
  17. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Member

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    I'm not sure about that. I recall seeing period newspaper ads referring to the 51 Colt as "of Naval caliber" As far as the Navy buying revolvers. Anything used by the Marine Corp is on the Dept of Navy property books.


    OK, that does it, I have to get one now. So what choices do I have, Pietta, does Uberti make a .36 Remington?
     
  18. ClemBert

    ClemBert Member

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  19. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    I have a very old book (70 years old) titled; A History of the Colt Revolver From 1836 To 1940...printed in 1940, which the Colt factory had heavy participation in, with one page by their vice president and one page honoring the help from their secretary and museum curator who had been there for over 54 years. (since 1886?) This book has many photos and patent drawings as well as letters from and to Samuel Colt and the US Govt as well as individual Naval officers concerning his weapons and shows that the Colt factory did indeed supply revolvers to the US Navy as well as call the 1851 and other revolvers "Navy" models in .36 caliber! There is even an advertisement for Colt parts directly from the factory showing parts for a "Navy" model.
    There are also photos of cased set(s) of revolvers from collections of that period showing original boxes of combustible cartridges labeled for "Colt Navy pistols" from different manufacturers.
    I truly don't want to sound like a know-it-all...I'm not...but one thing I do know...if Colt refers to their 1851 revolving pistol as the 1851 (Old) Navy...I'm going to go by what Colt calls it and not what other "experts" say!
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2010
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