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Pigloos - Hog Survival Adaptiveness in Canada

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Double Naught Spy, Dec 20, 2019.

  1. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    I know folks have thought that the colder climate of the northern US has helped prevent feral hogs from being a problem, but that may be a rather naive assessment.

    Well, this is sort of cool for our far northern feral hog hunters. Apparently, hogs in Canada are surviving well enough, in part, due to use of sheltering in the snow in structures referred to as 'pigloos' which aren't actual igloos constructed by pigs, but burrows or tunnels in the snow used by pigs...not that destructive feral pigs are surviving is cool, but how adaptive they are is.

    https://news.usask.ca/articles/rese...risis-for-agriculture-and-the-environment.php

    Turns out that the hog problem isn't just a southern problem. Feral hogs have been growing noticeably in number and distribution across part of Canada as well in the last 30 years.

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/invasive-pigs-canada-1.5136431
     
  2. DocRock

    DocRock Member

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    Thanks for sharing that. I understood that recently feral hogs of domestic origin which have been bred to have lesser cover/coat, as it were, might not handle the cold well, but the so-called 'European boar' thrives in Central and Eastern Europe. Winter on the plains of Poland or Hungary, let alone up in the Carpathian mountains, is no joke!

    Hogs are all the same species and my understanding is that a feral domestic breed will, by its third descent litter, spawn hogs largely indistinguishable from the so-called wild boar, except for color variations.

    They are for all their vastly destructive nature, cunning and resilient (I'm talking about hogs, but that also describes our political elite). So, discovery that they adapt to winter conditions in their pigloos (a term our British friends use to describe Porta Potties at a music fesrival) is not so surprising.

    As to those northerners that yearn for wild hog populations? Don't. They are a menace.
     
  3. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    So...in the colder months it's going to take some 'Tunnel Rats' to get to them. Our Viet Nam era members will recognize that term.

    Yes, Feral Hogs are certainly adaptive.
     
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  4. alsaqr

    alsaqr Member

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    Wild hogs in the Yukon. Neat!!
     
  5. RetiredUSNChief

    RetiredUSNChief Member

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    Out of tall the domestic animals humans have, pigs are perhaps the ones closest to completely losing their domestic breeding at the drop of a hat.

    And it always amazes me how people underestimate the ability of animals to survive in harsh environments...as if not being human means they can't figure out how to survive outside of human habitations.

    For an animal like a pig, surviving in cold/snowy conditions is not that difficult. Snow is an insulator, for one, and pigs are a rooting, omnivorous species.

    On top of that, they are acknowledged as being highly intelligent and have few natural predators with low mortality rates because of this.
     
  6. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    "Highly intelligent" is a bit of a stretch, but I do concede that they are smarter than many human hunters that go after them. :D
     
  7. George P

    George P Member

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    Be careful what you wish for! Florida is overrun with them and they cause huge amounts of damage.
     
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  8. H&Hhunter

    H&Hhunter Moderator Staff Member

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    They thrive in Siberia. I’m not sure why people are surprised that can handle the cold.
     
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  9. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    I think the surprise is not that European boar survive in Siberia, the Austrian Alps, or where ever, but that feral hogs do. We all know they are the same species, but people like to make a big deal about there being phenotypic differences. For the longest time over here, the feral hog problem was almost nil in the colder clines and so people believed the cold was the exclusionary factor for feral hogs. It may be a limiting factor, but it is far from being an exclusionary factor. Dry, desert areas may be a limiting factor as well, but it is also not exclusionary

    That contrasts with warmer areas where feral hogs have thrived and been a problem even with the earliest of colonies such as with Jamestown. There, they free-ranged pigs that became so numerous that they had to build a palisade around the colony for protection from them.
    https://books.google.com/books?id=a...Bw#v=onepage&q=jamestown overrun hogs&f=false
     
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  10. alsaqr

    alsaqr Member

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    i grew up in Randolph county, West Virginia. Parts of the Cheat mountain area to around Cass, WV had a relatively small population of feral hogs. Those wild hogs were descendants of domestic hogs kept by the numerous logging camps.
     
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