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Pistol for Daughter

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Gary G23, Jan 24, 2003.

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  1. Gary G23

    Gary G23 Member

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    With my son-in-law heading off for the war effort, I'd like to get my daughter a pistol for home protection while he is gone. Most of my guns are 40 or 357 without manual safeties, but I feel a 9mm with a manual safety (she has a child in the home) would be best for her. What would you recommend given the parameters specified (9mm, manual safety)?
     
  2. Min

    Min Member

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    I'd recommend a Taurus PT-111/9mm. It's got one of those internal locks that she can use to disable the gun's functionality.

    Plus, it's relatively cheap.
     
  3. craigz

    craigz Member

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    Beretta 92FS. Comfortable and fun to shoot, relatively cheap 15-rounders available, and an action that's smooth as glass and easy to hand cycle.
     
  4. Mastrogiacomo

    Mastrogiacomo Member

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    Advice from another female shooter, get her a 92FS Beretta 9mm. I have two Beretta type M compacts, which fire eight rounds. They're small, compact, manual safety, slender grip and very comfortable to shoot. Low recoil and highly accurate. However, I have the compacts in type M because of a permit restriction. If she can get the full size, I highly recommend them as well but if it's a smaller version she's after, have her check out the compact L and the compact M to compare. They're fantastic guns and I'm sure she'll be very pleased with how well they perform and how easy it is to maintain. Also, relatively inexpensive -- I don't have a job and own two Berettas so that should give you some idication of how affordable they are. :D
     
  5. DAL

    DAL Member

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    Let her decide.

    Take her to your favorite gun store, set the minimum caliber limit, and let her see what feels best for her. A Beretta might be right for her, but then again, it might not be. Make sure she can hold the gun in a straight line with the bones of her forearm (the radius and ulna, I believe). If she has to cant the gun out of alignment with the bones to reach the trigger, the gun is probably too big for her. When you find the right gun, buy a case of ammo and take her out to practice with it multiple times. Also, don't forget to teach her about safety, if she doesn't already know about it.

    If she has small hands, you'll probably want to stay away from double-stack guns. Although I've never fired one, I do like the way the SIG P239 feels in my hand. Also, a single-stack 1911 in 9mm would probably fit just about anyone's hand (I'm guessing somebody makes this).

    Good luck on your search, and let us know what she chooses.
    DAL
     
  6. Mastrogiacomo

    Mastrogiacomo Member

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    I agree, let her decide but just to add -- I'm only 5'2" 115-120 lbs and have tiny hands that have been described as "piano hands" from my Italian instructor. In martial arts classes, I'm the delicate one...

    As I said, if the Beretta in full size is "too much gun" which I doubt because it wasn't for me, go to the compacts. The M will have a more narrow grip. Also with narrow grips: the Beretta Cougar and Vertec -- both of which are available in 9mm. The best thing to do though is take her to a range to rent some guns and maybe try one of these out. Also, take her around the shops to feel how some of them handle to her grip. Lastly, take your time with the guns. Don't be too quick to buy. This should be a gun she actually practices with, not keeps in the closet for a rainy day. If that's all she plans for the gun, save your money and buy a dog...
     
  7. Sisco

    Sisco Member

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    My niece bought a gun for protection at home, found out she got a Jennings .380. Took her out to the range where we spent most of out time clearing jams. I suggested she take the Jennings to a pawn shop and see how much they'd charge to take it off her hands and get a good 9mm. :evil:
    She told me she had fired her father-in-laws Beretta and didn't like the recoil. She shot my Ruger P-95 and liked it, said it wasn't anything like the Beretta.
    I've never shot a Beretta but I can't imagine that much difference in recoil between the two. Don't know what kind of ammo she was using in the Beretta, we were shooting +P handloads in the Ruger.
     
  8. 10-Ring

    10-Ring Member

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    Let her decide..rent a bunch of guns & let her try them out...various guns & calibers. Discuss pro's & con's of each.
     
  9. Bruz

    Bruz Member

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    When she is trying them out have her try a Walther P99 9mm...I know that alot of shooteres do not like tupperware guns, but it is very light and has adjustable, ergonomic grips. Have her get a Doberman too!
     
  10. Mark IV Series 80

    Mark IV Series 80 Member

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    I wouldn't push your daughter into an autoloader....... a revolver is often the best choice for shooters with limited experience.

    The revolver is easier to verify whether it's loaded or not, easier to load and unload (did she forget about the one in the pipe?)

    The revolver is easier to learn...... what does this button do? What about this lever? What if it jams?

    Women do not always have the hand strength to rack a slide, and many don't like to break their finger-nails by loading magazines, manipulating levers, and racking slides.

    You could show her, and let her shoot, some small and medium-frame revolvers by Smith & Wesson and Ruger, and see which one she likes the best.

    I wouldn't recommend an autoloader to anyone as their first defensive handgun.
     
  11. Pico

    Pico Member

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    Suggestion

    Instead of hoping the child won't figure out how to take the weapon off safe think instead of a trigger lock and/or a gun safe.

    That being said, find out if she can rack a semi-auto first. My wife has trouble with both of mine. If that's the case, put a revolver in her hands. If she has strength to rack it, Glock 19 or 26 even though they don't have a manual safety, CZ 75 compact/PCR, or Beretta 9000. For the last tell her to watch Minority Report and say it's Tom's gun.



    Pico:)
     
  12. Mastrogiacomo

    Mastrogiacomo Member

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    Christ give me a break! :eek: Biggest mistake of my life in handguns was buying a revolver. Even my little hands can rack a slide. "What does this do, what does that do..." Take lessons! If you're going to buy a revolver and leave it in the closest, don't bother and just get a dog. The best investment in a gun is a pistol: whether it's a Beretta (my first choice) or a Glock, Sig, Walther, etc. The pistol should be her choice as she's buying it and using it at the range, but for the love of God don't push her to buy a revolver. I'm still kicking myself for giving in to the revolver hype. :fire: :cuss: :banghead:
     
  13. Shane

    Shane Member

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    Okay, your parameters are basically 9mm with a safety. You never said to rule out single action 9mm's though.


    How about a Browning High Power? Just one mode of trigger pull to learn, and she still has a manual safety.



    BTW, I also like Berettas as a couple posters mentioned. A beretta is a good choice.

    I have one gripe though, if this thread (click to open thread) is true, Beretta is going with plastic parts more than my liking. Something to consider if its a new Beretta. I don't know whether or not this thread in the Beretta board is correct, I'm just throwing it out for discussion.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2003
  14. TarpleyG

    TarpleyG Member

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    I agree with Mark IV, a revolver should at least be considered. I don't know what people have against revolvers. I was going to get one for my wife and she said she didn't like it. Wanted a semi, she said. She knows VERY LITTLE about guns and I am slowly getting her in the swing. A revolver is easier for her to deal with.

    GT
     
  15. Shane

    Shane Member

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    Oh, and I also agree with those that have given the advice to consider revolvers as well.
     
  16. Mastrogiacomo

    Mastrogiacomo Member

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    There are some wonderful pistols out there and choosing a gun should never be limited to not knowing how it works. This is why we go to NRA instructors, which anyone with a revolver should do as well. If this is her choice for a revolver great but don't let it be because she's afraid of the complicated look of a pistol. They aren't that complicated and it can be overcome with just a lesson or two on how to handle them. Pistols are also more accurate at a distance and in my opinion, easier to control. Unlike revolvers, pistols also have a manual safety.:)
     
  17. Mastrogiacomo

    Mastrogiacomo Member

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    @Shane

    Try the www.berettaforum.net for info on Beretta guns and their parts. It's a great site for info on all things Beretta. :D
     
  18. Shane

    Shane Member

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    Thanks for the link. I agree its a great site for info. The thread I linked to (three posts above) came from Berretaforum.net.
     
  19. Nick96

    Nick96 Member

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    I have to go with Mark IV on this. If she doesn't know enough about handguns to pick what she wants (and why) - then a revolver is a better choice. Probably nothing more than a .22 at that.

    And the notion of a "safety" on a handgun passing for "child proofing" is absurd. The only "childproof" gun is one that is completely empty - gun and ammo separated and independantly secured. If she's afraid to leave a loaded revolver laying around - good - she should be. She needs to be as or more afraid of leaving a loaded semi laying around. If she wants a gun in the house, she needs to figure out a way that ONLY SHE can access it. Like a touch pad gunsafe or a padlock through trigger guard with the key on a string around her neck

    I personally know a woman who got a semi, received instruction, went to the range and practiced with it and appeared to be knowledgable about it. But, in a rush to get the thing unloaded and out of the reach of the kids, managed to blow a hole in the floor with it. Luckily there wasn't a child or her head in the way when this occured.

    The lesson learned - the simpler the better. Semi's (any size, shape, model or caliber) are for people that are "into" guns - period.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2003
  20. rick458

    rick458 Member

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    Many women like commanders even in .45
     
  21. dairycreek

    dairycreek Member

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    Don't know anything about the female shooter!

    Is she strong? Does she have large hands? Is she a motivated learner as far as guns/shooting are concerned? I raise these questions because I have four daughter (all grown and gone now) and all of these questions (and many more) arose as I tried to teach them about guns and shooting. One became a "revolver person". Two became "auto persons" and the fourth just never got interested. My advice is to provide the best instruction you can and then just let her choose. Good shooting:)
     
  22. Dienekes

    Dienekes Member

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    We're long on variables and short on facts here. An NRA class would be a VERY good idea here unless she already has a good basic understanding of all this. Better that than a $600 gun and no skills to go with it.

    All general statements, including the one I now make, are incorrect. BUT I have instructed on this topic and have some experience at it.

    Women and semiautos are not usually friends. Sometimes--but often not. A J or K frame with a nice DA is hard to beat, but make sure the strength is there and the load is one that can be tolerated.

    Semiautos can work; the KISS principle is better. As mentioned, there are complexity and strength issues. Simple guns that come to mind are Kahr, Glock, and DAO Rugers (P95?).

    Storage and safety are critical with a child around. Theoretical protection from goblins is of small comfort if a child is hurt or killed to get it. A quick-open combo type safe would be good. One of the advantages of a semi-auto would be the ability to keep it completely empty and the mag separate or on the person until wanted as well.

    A very tricky issue and one deserving of a lot more thought than just 'which bullet launcher to buy'. It could be that the best decision would be NO gun--it's that big a deal.
     
  23. CWL

    CWL Member

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    I would suggest a HK P7M8 for ultimate safety because of the 13-14lb squeeze-cocker safety. Few kids or BGs will be able to figure it out unless they are familiar with it. Only problem is the price... But if you want the best...

    If considering a Beretta, please look at the more compact models. The 92fs is a big pistol. many US military men have problems with the size of the grip, myself included. Not a good thing to try & retain if sweaty & nervous.

    I also like the idea of a revolver. No safety, but personally, any kid that wants to can figure out how to flick the safety off a gun. Securely locked gun, or well-trained kids are better than a safety.
     
  24. mainmech48

    mainmech48 Member

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    IMO, the biggest "plus" in favor of revolvers for anyone, male or female, who's just learning to shoot is their ability to use very mild "mid-range" target loads without modification.

    This allows the novice to "work their way up" to full-power defensive loads in stages, as their skill levels and confidence increase. It's been my experience that the basics of proper trigger control, sight picture, etc., are more easily acquired for many people without the added distractions of sharp recoil and very loud report.

    Positive reinforcement is crucial in building a positive attitude toward learning a new skill set. Reactive targets such as a falling plate or "swinger" where the feedback is both visible and audible will help immensely by rewarding the beginner with "instant gratification" for performing correctly.

    A .357 revolver, with its ability to allow the shooter to progress at their own pace through perhaps the broadest power range available in one handgun, make it a great "1st gun".
     
  25. Gary G23

    Gary G23 Member

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    Thanks for such DIVERSE responses. It gives me a lot to think about. I personally agree with Mastrogiacomo on the revolver issue but I will let my daughter decide. The decision on how to keep a gun accessible to an adult but inaccessible to a child is a hard one to make. I'll definitely give it much thought. I have been robbed at gunpoint before and am well aware that the bad guys never give you a two minute warning though.
     
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