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pocket revolvers

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by pohill, Sep 25, 2006.

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  1. pohill

    pohill Member

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    I'm interested in a .31 caliber pocket model, either the 1849 with the loading lever or the Wells Fargo without. Is it worth getting the 1849 with the loading lever, or is the lever so small that it's hard to use?
     
  2. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    I have the Wells Fargo. I converted it to cartridge using an R&D cylinder, and it is much nicer looking than it would have been with the loading ram.

    I never had any problems loading it without a ram when I was shooting it cap & ball.
     
  3. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    I have the 1863 "New Model Pocket"; it's nice. You might consider that, too. :)
     
  4. pohill

    pohill Member

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    I have an 1862 .36 Pocket Police.
    Where can I find an 1863 New Model Pocket?
    Thanks.
     
  5. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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  6. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Short Rammer Handles.

    Years ago a friend showed me an easy answer to cap & ball revolvers that had short rammer handles. He simply slipped a piece of metal tubing over the rammer handle and had an instant longer one. When he finished loading he simply pulled off the extension and went about his business. ;)

    Concerning the current question about a short-barreled 1849 Pocket Model. If I was condidering a cartridge conversion that might be changed back to a C & B I would get a revolver with a ramer, and of course I'd want a rammer if it was going to be used exclusively as a "cap gun," but on the other hand if it would always be used as a cartridge gun either style would be O.K.
     
  7. Seth Hawkins

    Seth Hawkins Member

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    If this is a gun that you plan to shoot a lot as a conversion, you might want to go with the '63 Remmington. That gun is MUCH easier to use as a conversion. No wedge to remove, no barrel removal necessary, etc. The Remmie cylinder can be removed in a few seconds - making loading/unloading cartridges from the conversion cylinder much quicker & easier.

    I have a '49 Wells Fargo that I occasionally use in CAS - maybe 2-3 times a year, so the inconvenience of removing the cylinder isn't that much of a hassel. To be honest, it's probably just as quick and easy to load the percussion cylinder on the Pocket Pistol w/rammer as it is to pull the Wells Fargo apart to load/unload the conversion cylinder.

    The Wells Fargo is designed to use the cylinder arbor to seat the ball in the percussion cylinder, making it necessary to remove the barrel. At that point, loading a conversion cylinder would be easier.
     
  8. pohill

    pohill Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I hadn't even thought about converting to cartridge. Now I'm flipping around ( mentally - not agile enough to actually flip around) and thinking about a Ruger. Or a Target Remington.
     
  9. mike101

    mike101 Member

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    Greetings, Pohill

    Buy the Ruger! They are a joy to shoot, they are made of better steel, and fit and finish are much better. They also have modern lockworks, with coil springs that DON'T BREAK!!! If there is a shop nearby, where you can see the two side by side, I don't think it will be a much of a contest.

    The Ruger is also very strong, as it is based on the Blackhawk/Super Blackhawk. If you get a conversion cylinder, the Ruger will handle any .45 Colt ammo you care to use, unlike the Italian guns, or any Colt SAA. I've read where they were tested with Buffalo Bore ammo (1450 fps), and the gun did just fine. You can get a cylinder from R&D, but it will be nickel plated steel, not stainless. Bigiron can make you one out of stainless, and their prices aren't bad at all.

    The Ruger is more expensive, but well worth it. You can get a good deal on a new one from most of the dealers who are selling them on Gunsamerica.com. They have used ones also.
     
  10. pohill

    pohill Member

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    Over the past few years I ask to see a Ruger in the case at The Store once a month or so. I even had one on hold for a week. They have nice used ones starting around $310 which isn't bad. I had a Remington that I traded Smokin' Gun for a Paterson - Remingtons are great guns, too, and I wouldn't mind getting another. Every gun I get is going to be my last one...yeah, right.
     
  11. Wwalstrom

    Wwalstrom Member

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    Ruger vs. Remington Target

    "Buy the Ruger! They are a joy to shoot, they are made of better steel, and fit and finish are much better. They also have modern lockworks, with coil springs that DON'T BREAK!!!"

    Parts that don't break?!?!?!? Where's the fun in that? I like to tinker ... not to mention that I prefer the looks of my Remmies to the Ruger. I can buy a brand new Target model Remington, spare cylinder, spare parts kit, and still not have spent as much money as a Ruger would cost.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2006
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