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POLL: Wood grips for Airweight/Airlite J-frame shooting +P?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Holsters and Accessories' started by brentfoto, Mar 16, 2008.

?

Wood grips vs. rubber grips for Airweight/Airlite with .38 +P. Why bother?

Poll closed Mar 23, 2008.
  1. Wood grips absorb the pain of felt recoil better than rubber grips.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. There is no discernible difference re felt recoil/pain, etc. between wood and rubber

    1 vote(s)
    5.9%
  3. Wood is more attractive and I don't care if it hurts more.

    6 vote(s)
    35.3%
  4. Wood is more attractive and does not hurt more.

    4 vote(s)
    23.5%
  5. I don't care because I's 'macho' man and I want to look good.

    1 vote(s)
    5.9%
  6. I don't care because I always wear gloves while practicing.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. I get a 'kickback' from vendors whenever I refer a customer to buy wood grips.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. I get a 'kickback' whenever I refer a customer to buy rubber grips.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. I shoot the J-frame more accurately with wooden grips

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. I shoot the J-frame more accurately with rubber grips.

    5 vote(s)
    29.4%
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  1. brentfoto

    brentfoto member

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    Why would anyone consider wood grips for a Airweight or Airlite J-frame? Assume that you would practice and shoot only .38 +P's. Would the felt recoil be more in comparison to rubber grips?
     
  2. yongxingfreesty

    yongxingfreesty Member

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    lol, they loook freaking nice. its a self defense pistol, ill carry it more than i shoot it.
     
  3. jgo296

    jgo296 member

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    473
    only the dutch wear wood shoes rubber absorbs shock better
    i do think wood looks better but you can get rubber grips with a laser inside
     
  4. Arkady

    Arkady Member

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    I went with wood grips on my J-frame because the slightly increased thickness made the pistol easier to shoot well, and much more comfortable during long range sessions.

    I haven't noticed any difference in felt recoil.
     
  5. brentfoto

    brentfoto member

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    Thanks for replies and votes thus far.

    Some of the poll answers were obviously made in jest.

    As to comments thus far, the one by jgo296 about the Dutch by was a pretty good comparison, in my view.

    Another comment by Arkady mentioned no difference in felt recoil.

    Another referenced carry it more than shoot it, so yong****** goes with wood. But ya gotta practice, and I subscribe to the notion that whatever grip you use for carry should be used for practice. And with the J you should practice a lot.

    Keep votes and comments coming. Thanks.

    I created this poll due to some frustration in finding rubber grips that are comfortable with +P AND conceal well, so I thought of considering wood. Still considering...
     
  6. SAWBONES

    SAWBONES Member

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    The options on your "Poll" don't include the only true choice, "I find rubber grips cushion recoil on J-frames better than wood grips".
     
  7. Guitargod1985

    Guitargod1985 Member

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    Jul 11, 2007
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    Florida
    I've found that wood grips are better if you are using the gun for concealed carry. Wood is easier to slide off clothing, whereas rubber gets stuck on clothing.

    On my concealed carry revolver I have wood grips for the above reason, while I have rubber grips on my range guns.
     
  8. the naked prophet

    the naked prophet Member

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    Indeed.
     
  9. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    I also have a problem with the choices. I have two revolvers with wood grips that do a better job of lessening the felt recoil by being wider/bigger. And not only look better, but give much better control then rubber...
     
  10. Starter52

    Starter52 Member

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    If I was a "Barney Miller" type of detective who walked around with an exposed revolver all day, I'd go with pretty wood stocks (and swap 'em when I had to qualify.)

    I'm not a detective and I don't often CCW a revolver, so I voted for rubber.
     
  11. chieftain

    chieftain Member

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    My Crimson Trace does not come in wood grips.

    Go figure.

    Fred
     
  12. jhco

    jhco Member

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    i use the lady smith grips from s&w and i cant feel much more recoil than normal plus they look great plus i paid 400 for the 642 and 50 for the grips vs 600 for a lady smith plus it dosnt have the words LADYSMITH stamped on it
     
  13. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    Any small lightweight gun with heavy recoil and small grips is going to kick and bite. That said, wood grips like the Eagle Secret Service can help your control without being overly large. This is not so much from the material itself as the different shape. If you choose the smooth rosewood there is no sharp checkering to gouge or abrade your hand. If you go too large you defeat the purpose of having a little gun and you might as well go to a medium-frame revolver.
     
  14. brentfoto

    brentfoto member

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    Yes, I overlooked the obvious answer that rubber is better than wood. I guess I omitted it unconciously because at the time of the poll I was not happy with the rubber boot grips that came with the gun and subsequent purchase of the Hogue Bantam Grips also did not help with the discomfort of the recoil.

    In lieu of omitting the direct reference, if rubber is better for comfort and recoil, then the third alternative would have been the closer choice.

    BTW, I hereby offer my Hogue Bantam grips for the J-frame for sale. Anyone interested? If so, PM me.
     
  15. Owen Meany

    Owen Meany Member

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    I'm very surprised that only one of the responses so far mentioned what I consider to be the only important reason to go with wood - and it took seven responses before someone brought it up! Guitargod1985 nailed it:

    Considering that the OP correctly pointed out the below,

    well, there you go. Most methods of concealed carry all but require wood grips if clothing is not to hang up at inopportune times, so that translates into practicing with those same wood grips on the gun. Even with +P loads in the AirLites, I find Eagles and Craig Spegels to be only moderately uncomfortable (the Eagles somewhat moreso), certainly not punishing. Hogue Bantams (the wood versions) are downright comfy because they are a lot thicker - but also less concealable, of course.

    But, for any carry method that doesn't rely upon gravity to keep the covering garment over the gun, by all means, go with rubber grips. Purely from a shooting perspective, they are FAR more comfortable than wood due to the resiliency of the rubber. No reason not to give yourself every advantage possible, and if you can make practice that much easier, you'll shoot more often and gain proficiency.

    Brentfoto said:

    I found this interesting. With the Airweights and AirLites, as I said above, +P recoil with wood boot grips is mildly unpleasant but not unbearable. That's with wood, which is far harsher than absorptive rubber; with rubber boot grips such as the (rubber) Hogue Bantams and Uncle Mike's rubber boot grip, which is a copy of Craig Spegel's wood grips, I should think you'd be approaching the "very tolerable" range, if not downright comfort.

    Of course, individuals vary, so I'm not sure exactly what your Holy Grail is when you said you wanted rubber grips that were "comfortable" with +P and also concealed well. If you hadn't mentioned dissatisfaction with the Hogues, they would have been one of only two grips that I would recommend. Having eliminated those from the equation, however, my only remaining suggestion is the Uncle Mike's rubber boot grip that I mentioned above. They are standard equipment on the Airweight revolvers and are a tad larger than the rubber Bantams front-to-back; the palm swell might be about the same overall, though the contours are rather different than the Hogues. Ergonomically, I prefer the Spegel/Uncle Mike's shape.

    There are, of course, many more rubber grip options that can make the J-frame - any J-frame, even the Airlites - a pussycat to shoot, but these hand-filling grips are going to be so big that you will neutralize any concealability advantage that you've gained by choosing so small a revolver.
     
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