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polymer/sythetic life spans

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by tango3065, Jul 25, 2007.

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  1. tango3065

    tango3065 Member

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    I just realized that most of my long guns and most of my handguns have either polymer furniture and polymer frames and I wonder in 40-50 years if they will still be like they are now? I have total trust in my glocks and I know that they have been buries in everything from sand to saltwater but these test really don't shed a light on longevity over time, any opinions.
     
  2. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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  3. tango3065

    tango3065 Member

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    Yes I have a post on there also, btw that thread is what got me thinking.
     
  4. Quiet

    Quiet Member

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    You can still find the first production polymer handguns (H&K VP-70Z) on the market in excellent shape and they are over 35 years old.
     
  5. Boats

    Boats member

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    I figure they will last long enough for who they are for. Now I just have to find one I want to keep around that long. At least my wife has found her polymer pistol in the form of an S&W M&P9. Me? I have been through H&K, Walther, the XD, and extensively tried Glocks, and still haven't found love.
     
  6. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Member

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    Boats, how about a Kahr?

    I think they'll last as long as steel guns, without the rust. If you store them in your oven they may warp a little :). All the 20 year old 1st gen Glocks I've seen look good as new.
    I may eat my words in 50 years with a limp g23 drooping in my hands and a frown on my face but I think they'll do just fine. These aren't made out of recycled 1975 pickup dashboards.
     
  7. JesseL

    JesseL Member

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    I wonder how the polymers used for firearms hold up to UV exposure? That's the only thing I can think of that would ever pose a long term threat to plastic guns. It's not really an issue since most guns are typically stored in the dark, rather than on a window sill or dashboard.
     
  8. ArfinGreebly

    ArfinGreebly Moderator Emeritus

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    Silly Boys

    Y'all should have gotten the Glock 7.

    They're ceramic, and they will never have that "UV decay" problem that plastics do.

    :D
     
  9. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    I think its far too early too tell~! :eek: For the most part, old farts like
    myself will long since be dead and gone; leaving our children and grand
    children to ponder this question. :scrutiny: But, properly kept and with a little
    TLC; I see NO reason why the polymer weapons systems won't survive.
    ;):D
     
  10. ConstitutionCowboy

    ConstitutionCowboy member

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    There is usually more than just polymer in them. They have fiberglass and other fibers in them that'll hold 'em together for who knows how long. The old Bakelite and Micarta seem to have lasted quite well over time.

    Woody
     
  11. RNB65

    RNB65 Member

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    I'm guessing that none of us here will live long enough to find out how long a Glock frame will last. :)
     
  12. Neo-Luddite

    Neo-Luddite Member

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    The old Bakelite and Micarta seem to have lasted quite well over time.

    Bakelite is the only plastic I like. I won't buy polymer guns. When you get in a shootout at the acetone factory or some mo-mo invents polymer eating bacteria--UGGH--hand full of goop.

    I'm sure the glocks will be good for 50 years or better. My bet is that VERY harsh solvents and UV degredation would be the biggest threats to longevity.
     
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