Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Prob with S & W 629 cylinder screw

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by arnie08515, Nov 17, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. arnie08515

    arnie08515 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    27
    I have a new 629 which has about 300 rounds of 44 magnums through it. Boy is that a fun gun if there is such a thing. I can only shoot about 30 rounds session before my hand gets slightly sore. I really shouldn't have bought it (it was new) but it was one of those things that you see behind the counter and think of Dirty Harry.

    I noticed a few days ago that my cyclinder screw got loosen which made me angry. This is the screw that is on the cylinder lock which you push forward to open the cylinder. I just tighten it up but have any you had this happen just after 300 rounds on a 44. I am thinking of using locktite on the screw but want to check with S & W first before doing so.
     
  2. P95Carry

    P95Carry Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    16,341
    Location:
    South PA, and a bit West of center!
    That screw can do that - same on a M27 .357 also.

    If it repeatedly wants to loosen use some medium (blue) loctite - that should cure the problem but also mean the screw can be removed if need be later - with an exact ideal driver blade.
     
  3. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    In days gone by S&W would stake the cap, which you call a screw, so the problem isn't new. By all means use a drop of BLUE locktite or a drop of clear finger nail polish will also do. It seems to happen most in the heavy recoiling guns, such as .44 Magnums.

    Do your hands a favor, and get a pair of shooting gloves for use at the range while doing extensive shooting.
     
  4. arnie08515

    arnie08515 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    27
    old Fuff

    Thanks for the note. i bought the 629 new and replaced the grips with the hogue 500 grips used on the sw 500 and they work perfectly in absorbing most of the recoil. they are amazing grips, still there is nothing like the bang of a 44 and the gun is still, to me, the "the most powerful handgun in the world" regardless of all the newer ones out there now. i shot about 30 to 40 rounds and that's enough. it makes my 9mms look tame in comparison. one time at a crowded indoor range i shot and for about 10 secs there was dead silence and i heard one young teenager state " that was a shock wave someone's got the 500."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2006
  5. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    23,908
    Location:
    Arizona
    Yes, no pistol cartridge comes close to the performance offered by the .44 Magnum. Switching to the larger grips was a good idea, and should go a long way in helping tame the recoil. I think a drop of thread sealent will cure your present problem and it will be smooth sailing thereafter. :)
     
  6. Jack19

    Jack19 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,064
    Location:
    Eastern CSA
  7. SAKOHUNTER

    SAKOHUNTER Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    168
    Location:
    Ft. Collins, CO.
    After reading this I had to go check my 686+ and 629. 629 was ok but the screw on my 686+ was a tad loose.

    Thanks for the heads up!:cool:
     
  8. SnWnMe

    SnWnMe Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2003
    Messages:
    1,099
    Location:
    Inland Empire
    Well 30 rds of 44 magnum without a break is plenty. I only do two cylindersful at a time spaced out during the shooting day until I get to 50 so you're a better man than I am.:eek:
     
  9. Confederate

    Confederate Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Messages:
    3,192
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    It's aggravating that this has been a problem for as long as it's been.

    The three weaknesses built into Smith revolvers are:

    1) cutting the bottom off the forcing cones so that the cylinders will close;

    2) putting the cylinder stops in the weakest areas--right over the chambers; and,

    3) having ejector rods screw out, which are one of the few things that can jam a revolver.

    Ruger doesn't have a problem with any of the above.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page