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Proof Mark

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by Kp321, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. Kp321

    Kp321 Member

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    image.jpeg I found this proof mark on a Winchester M-92, 44-40 that dates from the teens. The mak was repeated on the receiver, barrel, and the bolt. From limited research, the only thing that looks similar but not exact, is the London Proofhouse. Any help from the experts?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Steel Horse Rider

    Steel Horse Rider Member

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  3. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    It definitely looks like the single 'provisional' mark plus the caliber.
     
  4. Kp321

    Kp321 Member

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    Thank you very much. Now the question is, how did the 92 go through Great Britian and get back here?
     
  5. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    I think it is the single "provisional" proof, which (IIRC) was used on foreign arms which had been proved even though the proof was not officially recognized by England.


    [​IMG] [​IMG] In use from 1868-1925, this mark was used to show a single final proof with loads designed for temporary or provisional proof.

    As to how the rifle got "back here", it could have been bought in England and brought back by a tourist. Or it could have been turned in during one of several "amnesty" periods after WWII* and sold to an American arms dealer. No way at this point to tell.

    *After WWII, the British somehow came up with the idea that there would be no more wars if they only "persuaded" the British public to turn in their arms; many did, voluntarily, and tons of those arms were bought by outfits like Interarmco/Interarms and sold in the U.S. Later, the British stopped fooling around and imposed bans, confiscation and destruction on almost all privately owned firearms in the UK. Naturally, taking that Model 1892 out of the hands of an Englishman has ensured peace in the world. Hasn't it?

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017

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