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Proper Arrow Selection

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Gully, Jan 29, 2015.

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  1. Gully

    Gully Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2015
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    Hey guys I'm new here. The name's Gully.

    I've not picked up a bow since I was a cub scout but the older I get, the more I want to become proficient with one. I've ordered the classic Samick Sage 30# to learn me some fundamentals and my father-in-law says that once I get it and learn how to use it, there is a compound bow with my name on it in his closet.

    I've never really hunted before but that too intrigues me. Always been a city boy but he owns land and is an avid and accomplished hunter. At least that's what all the heads on his wall tells me.

    Can you guys recommend good arrows for the Samick? I'm overwhelmed at the selection. Also can someone explain the appropriate way to select a broadhead? Seems there is no shortage of lethal looking tips.
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Location:
    Eastern KS
    See this about arrow selection.

    http://www.archerychoice.com/how-to-guides/choose-arrows-bow/

    It is based on bow weight, and your draw length.

    I would not get to concerned about broad heads for hunting.

    A 35 pound bow is not suitable for deer hunting.
    And small game is best hunted with blunt tips that knock them out of their bunny slippers.

    rc
     
  3. Gully

    Gully Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2015
    Messages:
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    The limbs of the bow I am getting can be upgraded up to 65# and plus I have a PSE Compound waiting for me. The low draw weight is for practice. I'm just trying to garner as much info as I can.

    Thanks for the link. I will give it a read!
     
  4. equin

    equin Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Messages:
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    Location:
    North Texas
    Arrow selection will depend on the draw weight of the bow at your draw length. For instance, the limbs for your Samick Sage are rated at 30# at a draw length of 28". But if your draw length is less than 28", then the draw weight will be less as well. A general rule of thumb is that draw weight decreases about 2 to 3 lbs per inch less than 28", and increases 2 to 3 lbs per inch for a draw length greater than 28". Usually, the draw length for a longbow or recurve like a Samick Sage is less than it is for a compound bow.

    Once you get your draw length and draw weight figured out, there are certain arrow charts online that can help you pick out some arrows. I'd start out with aluminum arrows. I believe Easton sells aluminums. I normally use a small pipe/tube cutting tool from Home Depot to cut mine to length, but you can order aluminum arrows cut to desired length, which is usually 1" to 2" longer than your draw length.

    There are also carbon arrows, but they're more expensive, need a special saw to cut to length when tuning the arrows, and although less prone to breaking and bending than aluminum, need to be flex-tested to ensure they're safe to shoot each time you shoot one. Of course, you can always buy your carbon arrows cut to the length you desire just like with aluminum arrows.

    If you want to be real traditional, you can also order wooden arrows, but they can be just as expensive as carbon and are much more prone to breaking than carbon or aluminum. They also need to be flex-tested each time you shoot to make sure one doesn't snap in two upon release and become embedded into your wrist. I use a small coping saw to cut mine to length, but like aluminum and carbons, you can get them pre-cut to your desired length.

    Since a Samick Sage is a "traditional" bow (as opposed to a compound), you can get get traditional archery accessories at places like 3Riversarchery.com or KustomKingArchery.com. Both places sell arrows. In fact, I've called the folks at 3RiversArchery.com before and they helped me in choosing the right arrows for my setup.

    If you're going to shoot your arrows off the shelf, then get them fletched with feathers. If you're going to use an arrow rest, you can use regular vanes on them.

    Just as important as the length and stiffness of the arrow is the point weight of the field point, blunt or broadhead. The heavier the point weight, the weaker, or less stiff, the arrow becomes. The lighter the point weight, the stronger, or stiffer, the arrow becomes. It's all trial and error trying to figure out the exact stiffness and weight of the arrow that shoots and flies best out of any particular bow.

    Good luck and have fun. Archery can be real addicting!
     
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