Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Proper Bullet Seating Depth

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by AF_Reloader, Dec 27, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. AF_Reloader

    AF_Reloader Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2008
    Messages:
    31
    Hey guys, just a quick question about maximum cartridge length and determining the proper bullet seating depth for my particular gun.

    I'm following the Nosler guide (page 34-35 if you want to see it) that has you color the bullet with a marker, run the bullet into the rifle, and measure up to where the ink has been scraped off.

    Here's the question: according to my reloading manuals, the maximum length for a .270 cartridge is 3.34". All the seating tests are consistent at 3.401-3.403. Which means, after applying the last step (set your seating die to seat at a depth between .015 and .030 inches less than your rifle seating depth), my overall length is somewhere between 3.373 and 3.388. I'm gonna average it out at 3.380. Anyone think this will cause any problems?

    Frank
     
  2. Sunray

    Sunray Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    11,257
    Location:
    London, Ont.
    The only issue than might crop up is mag length. 3.380" may not fit in the mag, being 40 thou over max. You may have a long throat in your rifle. That won't matter if the loaded round doesn't fit in the mag. There's certainly no safety issue though.
     
  3. steve4102

    steve4102 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    2,452
    Location:
    Minnesota
    SAAMI max OAL pertains to ammo manufactures not the individual handloader. Here is what Accurate Powder says about OAL.

    SPECIAL NOTE ON CARTRIDGE OVERALL LENGTH “COL”
    It is important to note that the SAAMI “COL” values are for the firearms and ammunition manufacturers industry and must
    be seen as a guideline only.
    The individual reloader is free to adjust this dimension to suit their particular firearm-component-weapon combination.
    This parameter is determined by various dimensions such as 1) magazine length (space), 2) freebore-lead dimensions of
    the barrel, 3) ogive or profile of the projectile and 4) position of cannelure or crimp groove.





    .
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page