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Pro's and Con's: Glock 22 to a 9mm

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by CANNONMAN, Oct 17, 2015.

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  1. CANNONMAN

    CANNONMAN member

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    I've got an older Glock 22 and was thinking about trading it in for a 9mm. [Don't know which one I'd choose.] Anyway, please educate me as to pro's and con's of converting it into a 9mm. I did not know this could be done. Thanks.
     
  2. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    I've got a Glock 22 and a Glock 19.

    I bought the Glock 19 in preference to a Glock 23 because recoil of the Glock 22 was not to my liking. It's not like it's a 4" Model 29, but it's VERY violent, producing a lot of muzzle whip. I find my 3.5" Citadel 1911 in .45acp MUCH more controllable and pleasant to shoot.

    I find my Glock 19 both controllable and pleasant to shoot, although if I had it to do again, I'd probably get a Glock 23 and a 9mm conversion barrel, just for the versatility.

    In a steel gun, the .40 S&W is probably ok. In a gun as light as a Glock 22/23, not so much.
     
  3. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    Yes, you can shoot 9mm in 40 Glocks using conversion barrels.

    I use KKM/Lone Wolf 40-9 conversion barrels in my G22/G23/G27.

    Older generation 40 Glock mags may not reliably feed last couple of rounds of 9mm but newer generation mags work with 9mm. Springs/mag followers are consumable items and if your mag springs/followers are worn, replace them. So try your mags first and if they don't work well, you may need to use G17 mags.

    If your recoil spring assembly (RSA) is worn, replacing it will reduce felt recoil/muzzle flip. If you shoot a lot of full power factory loads, you may need to replace the RSA every several thousand rounds.
     
  4. John C

    John C Member

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    Cannonman;

    I have a huge amount of respect for you for your posts on the black powder forum. Knowing a bit about your technical skills, I'll tailor my response to you personally.

    Pros to converting:

    -easy to do, drop in barrel
    -have the ability to change back, two calibers in one
    -if you get an oversize barrel, you can fit it yourself for tight lock up
    -9mm is much easier and more pleasant to shoot than .40
    -can shoot lead 9mm ammo, since most (all?) conversion barrels have cut rifling. A replacement glock 9mm will have a polygonally rifled barrel

    Cons to converting:

    -may need new mags
    -will cost more, since you'll have to buy the conversion barrel. Presumably, you could sell or trade your .40 straight across for a similar 9mm
     
  5. PabloJ

    PabloJ member

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    The only advantage to 9x19 chambering is less expensive ammo. I have shot good number of Federal JHPs (Hydrashoks) through G29 and recoil was very reasonable. That was .40S&W load through gun roughly the size of G19. I would not make the trade.
     
  6. JDR

    JDR Member

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  7. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    I don't buy guns based on ammunition cost. That's why I reload.

    The BIG advantage of 9x19mm over .40 S&W is difference of sharpness of recoil. I find a compact M1911 with .45acp +Ps MUCH more pleasant to shoot than a Glock 22 with 180gr. Blazer FMJ-TCs.
     
  8. JDR

    JDR Member

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    Any of my .45's, especially my Gen4 Glock 21 are nicer to shoot than the Gen4 G-22 I had, was to shoot.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2015
  9. PabloJ

    PabloJ member

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    I have no problems shooting G20 with Winchester Silver tips or any Hornady JHPs (155s, 180s, 200s). You got me curious about mythical recoil and 'snap' of the G22 .40 S&W. Next time I go to the range I'm going to rent one out.
     
  10. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    The 9mm barrel will work fine.

    Nice thing is, barrels like Lake Storm have standard rifling. You can use plain old lead bullets when you reload without fear!

    Deaf
     
  11. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    If you do all the parts required for reliability, then the total cost is half way to buying another Glock. Do that instead.

    .40 to .357 is an easy fix, but swapping the ejector for a .40 to 9mm swap is kind of a pain.
     
  12. USAF_Vet

    USAF_Vet Member

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    One of the few Glocks I shoot on a regular sort of basis, and with any sort of comfort and accuracy, is the Glock 22. I don't experience the snappy recoil that a lot of folks complain about with the .40 S&W. This may be the one instance where the grip angle actually helps.

    In regard to a 9mm drop in conversion for the G22:
    Pros for the conversion:
    - It will be a bit heavier.
    - You don't spend the money for an entirely new gun.
    Cons against the conversion:
    - It will be a bit heavier
    - You don't get to buy a new gun.

    The added weight will reduce the recoil when shooting the 9mm, making follow up shots a little quicker. It also makes it potentially less comfortable to carry. A quality holster will alleviate the weight difference, which honestly isn't very considerable in the first place.


    A drop in conversion to .357 Sig is easier to accomplish (although a lot of people don't swap the .40 extractor when shooting 9mm, and have no problems) but I think the main pro is 9mm is much cheaper, and much more readily available than .357 Sig.
     
  13. shooter1

    shooter1 Member

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    Don't worry about buying all the 9mm specific parts for making the conversion. I've been there, done that with Glocks. You need a conversion barrel and magazines-------------period! I run this conversion in the 27/22/23/35 currently. Mine have been as reliable as the 9mm specific Glocks. If it makes you feel better to change the other parts, you'll need the spring loaded bearing, extractor, and ejector, in addition to the magazines and barrel. The .40 mags will work, well sort of. Mine would feed and fire about 8 out of 10. The other two live rounds would end up on the ground. When it would feed a round it would occasionally pop a loaded round out through the ejection port as it fed. Interesting!
    str1
     
  14. shooter1

    shooter1 Member

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    As for recoil, shoot a large bore revolver for about a year and you won't even notice recoil in any service caliber pistol.
    str1
     
  15. CANNONMAN

    CANNONMAN member

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    Thanks all! After I saw the incredible selection of after market parts and the sage comments of the .40 and moreover the Glock .40... well, why not! My only sorrow would be one less caliber that I would own and my 650 blue press not spitting out the rounds. Alas, to the future I go.
     
  16. batmann

    batmann Member

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    I have a Glock 22 and have a Lone Wolf 9MM conversion barrel. I have not noted an increase in weight worth noting. The convince factor more than offsets any weight increase.
    I mainly shoot .40 S&W out of my 22, but it sure is handy and quick to be able to change to 9MM. Pop out the barrel, change to the 9MM barrel, put a Glock 17 mag in and you are converted. Quick and simple. You can change a. Glock 22 .40 to a 9MM, but not Glock 17 a .40.
    One other thing I do is to mark my 9 MM mags with a big 9 on the side as they are not interchangeable caliber wise. I have 18 40 cal mags and 12 9MM mags and I keep them in separate shooting bags.
    I hope this helps. I am a big fan of the .40 S&W especially in the Glock 22 platform, but adding the ability to shoot both calipers increases the versatility of the 22.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2015
  17. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    The pro is that you can switch back. Never thought I would do it. But then one day I did. The original 40 barrel is way more accurate, and recoil is fine with my reloads.
     
  18. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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