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Protection from Bear?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Northslope Nimrod, Jun 18, 2007.

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  1. Northslope Nimrod

    Northslope Nimrod Member

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    This weekend we had an 11 year old boy that was drug from his tent and killed by a Bear in Utah.
    I sleep with a firearm, however, I fear that a Bear may yank me or one of my children far from our tent before I can react.
    Also, I often sleep alone with nothing but a piece of plastic and a sleeping bag while hunting elk.

    Thus, is there something I can spread around my camp area that will keep bears out?
     
  2. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    A Dog?

    It might not keep bears away, but it'll probably let you know there's a bear around.

    Then again, a frightened dog will run to its master for protection, and perhaps lead the bear right to you.

    Depends on the dog, of course. This one would probably work.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Northslope Nimrod

    Northslope Nimrod Member

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    Would work....but I'll pass on the dog. There aren't enough birds left in my area to hunt.....and I don't want to care for a dog for just this one issue. Plus, I don't want to hunt elk with a dog by my side.
    Any other ideas?
     
  4. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Well, if there was such a thing as something you could spread around to keep bears out, it'd be mighty popular a bit north of me. Yosemite has a lot of bears, a lot of campers, and no firearms allowed. We could get pretty rich selling the stuff to campers in California alone.

    Bears don't have predators, AFAIK. So they're not smelling for a threat; they're smelling for a food source. You could keep deer away by spreading mountain lion pee around, probably. But not bears. And if the bear avoids the scent of humans, you have nothing to worry about from that particular bear, anyway.

    Some sort of perimeter alarm is the best thing I can think of, which means settigng up a bunch of lasers or ground vibration sensors around your camp, or a dog.:)

    The expense and hassle of a high-tech alarm system at a campsite probably accounts for the popularity of dogs. And they'll play with your kids, too.

    But you're right, they do require a good amount of care, and they're probably not much good for elk hunting.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2007
  5. Polishrifleman

    Polishrifleman Member

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    I think a pre-warning system is a good idea but tricky. It sounds like you travel light so hauling extra stuff around might be a pain. Possibly some type of string with an audible device bells or something that you would hear rolling around. Place it outside camp about 4ft off the ground strung through the trees. This might unecessarly get your heart racing if a deer of elk go through it but then you would be alert.
     
  6. USMC_2674

    USMC_2674 Member

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    If you place it 4ft above the ground, most of the black bear around here will just go right under it and never trigger your alarm.

    I live in Utah. I have trapped Blackbears with BYU. I have hunted them.

    Place them 2ft above the ground. Many people overestimate how big our bears are. Not browns. Not grizzlies. Blacks.

    But plain and simply the best thing you can do is make sure you don't have any food in camp and just don't worry about it.

    This is the first black bear attack in Utah County in 28 years. There have been millions of people camping in Utah County in those 28 years.

    Semper Fidelis,

    Kent
     
  7. Mr. 16 gauge

    Mr. 16 gauge Member

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    When we were in Glacier NP, they tourist spots sold pepper spray in case of bear attacks. I thought it was just wishful thinking until I saw a video of a guy actually sneaking up on bears so he could surprise them and spray them in the face!:uhoh: The stuff worked.....sent the bears (grizzlys) runnin' for mama!

    As for dogs, there is one breed, the Karalinjian (sp?) bear dog that is bred specifically to be a warning/guard dog against bears. NOT good with kids, FWIW, but I have seen footage of them and they are FEARLESS!!!
     
  8. Alphazulu6

    Alphazulu6 member

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    Leave the damn dogs out of bear protection. A bear will kill a dog no problem. Its 300 lbs of wild animal vs some canine that really does not need to be exposed to that. If you want to protect yourself against a bear then carry a .30-60+ or if your hiking a .357/44 mag.
     
  9. AStone

    AStone Member

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    There is irrational hysteria afoot about black bear attacks. :uhoh:

    Here's the first rational response I've read:

     
  10. AStone

    AStone Member

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    #2 rational statement concerning black bear attacks.

    Keep the ******* food out of your tent!
     
  11. Northslope Nimrod

    Northslope Nimrod Member

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    Yes, maulings are VERY rare in Utah. Encounters are not so rare.
    When it happens, you start thinking about avoidance and defense possibilities. Mostly just an intellectual exercise....like "what would you do if...." scenarios.

    The big issue now in this case is that there was an incident the night before....presumably with the same bear. The blame game is going on right now.

    We have a place near the Uinta Mts. About every other year, a bear is taken out of cabin communities by the Fish & Game Dept. No doubt, food attracks 'em.

    I have a number of acquaintances that have had some close calls with bear in Utah. A neighbor actually shot at one with his bow and arrow in self defense. The arrow hit a small tree just in front of the bear and stuck in it. His brother was just down the hill below him. You can still see the fear in his eyes when he tells the story....but I think his brother was even more scared. As he heard his younger brother yelling and screaming at the bear, he thought he was being mauled (as he couldn't see them). The bear eventually left, but not until after charging toward the young bow hunter a number of times.

    Edited to add: I don't like dogs in the mountains. Just me. But IF I had a dog in the mountains, I would not hesitate to sacrifice the dog for me or my family. If my dog dies protecting me, he has served me well.
     
  12. trueblue1776

    trueblue1776 Member

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    Get a Carelian Bear dog, those things are insane.
     
  13. quatin

    quatin Member

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    The chances of you being attacked by a 2 legged creature is also pretty slim. Yet some of us still prepare for that.
     
  14. one-shot-one

    one-shot-one Member

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    i know 90% of all statistics are made up on the spot but i bet if someone researched it you'd find that your chances of being "attacked" by a "two legged" preditor are greater than any bear.:)
     
  15. wolf_from_wv

    wolf_from_wv Member

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    I thought it was 47% of statistics that were made up... :)

    Last month (?) we had a bear at the country club. They trapped it and relocated it. Last weekend there was a bear in a nearby city by the high school.
     
  16. budney

    budney member

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    Bears are generally wary of humans, so making them aware of your presence is good. Consider sewing bells on some of your gear. Also, +1 on the pepper spray.

    You should also learn how to differentiate between black and brown bear. Their droppings are a good way to tell. Black bear droppings are tubular, between 1-3/8 inches and 1-1/2 inches in diameter, and often contain visible plant matter. Brown bear droppings contain lots of little bells and smell strongly of hot peppers.

    --Len.
     
  17. koja48

    koja48 member

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    spread around my camp area

    It's what you DON'T spread around your camp area . . . cache food, get rid of trash, keep a clean camp. Personally, I keep a short-barreled shotgun full of slugs around mine when in bear country . . . effective against predators, 2-legged & 4-legged alike, should a situation arise.
     
  18. quatin

    quatin Member

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    My point is that bringing up the statistic that it "probably won't happen" is moot on this board. Since it "probably won't happen" that you'll get robbed, but many people on this board prepare for that. Arguing which "probably won't happen" is more likely doesn't take away from the fact that bears sometimes attack people.
     
  19. GRB

    GRB member

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    I think one of the best things you can do to prevent problems from black bears, while camping out, is to set up your camp properly. The sleeping area should be at least 15 yards from the eating and food preparation area. You should set up your tent before you prepare any food to reduce food smells around the sleeping area. After preparing food and eating, don't wipe hands on your clothing. Use a rag that stays in the food preparation area, and if at all possible wash with soap and water (alcohol gel or cleansing wipes are also good and sometimes much more practical). Any unprepared food should be hoisted up into a tree, suspended by a rope. It should be at least 8 feet from the ground, and a few feet down from the branch over which the rope is hung. Clean all pots and pans and grill used for cooking. Burn used paper goods or food wrappers (if legal to burn them in the area in which you are camping). Make sure no scraps remain around the area, burn any (again if legal).

    If you want a campfire near your tent, fine, but no cooking in it, not even marshmellows. Absolutely no food should be brought to within 15 yards of your sleeping area, further away is even better.

    Keep a couple cans of bear repellant in the tent with you. Use the type with a protector activator button so you don't roll over and set it off by mistake. Each person on the trip should have a can.

    A gun might be nice too. A powerful revolver would be a decent choice in Black Bear country. Be careful not to get spooked and shoot anyone by mistake. A fairly large, sheath knife is also something to have with you at all times. If ever actually attacked by a black bear (it is really on you biting away), you may want to do one of two things - play dead or fight back. It sure would be good for you to learn something about black bears and why and how they attack before you decide which to do, because the reason for the attack will make all the difference in the world as to which one to choose to do. A female protecting cubs usually requires a very different response from you than would a large male bear that was hunting you for food. Of course avoidance is the best thing to do to not be attacked.

    Black bear attacks are fairly uncommon, but they do take place now and again. It is a good thing to know how to handle one should it ever happen to you. So if you are out and about in bear country pretty often, or even only once a year, you should be in the know before you go.

    All the best,
    Glenn B
     
  20. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    I have often wondered if spraying ammonia or bleach around a campsie would have a discouraging effect on bears?
     
  21. salthouse

    salthouse Member

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    Take along a second sleeping bag filled with 25lbs of bacon. The bears will leave you alone.
     
  22. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    ?? Sure they do, where hunting is allowed. And of course brown bears prey on the black ones.

    I agree this whole thing is getting overblown. You don't need an alarm system in the woods. Just use common sense and keep aware of two and four legged threats.
     
  23. MassMark

    MassMark Member

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    Glen Bartley made a great post. There's so much hysteria about bear attacks in this country - while those spreading the madness generally don't realize how rare bear attacks are. It would almost be like not walking outside your home without a helmet for fear of being hit by an object falling from a building.

    Some "Google-time" will reveal not only how rare bear attacks really are, as compared to deaths caused by say bicycles. It will also reveal that guns are a less effective deterent to bear attack than pepper spray.

    I live in black bear country. The area around my home is thick with them and encounters with bears in my yard and the woods are so common that I've lost count. Respect for the bear and it's habits, environment and "space" is more important than figuring out ways to kill one. Prevention is worth a pound of bullets....
     
  24. Bob R

    Bob R Member

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    Bears....what's the big deal. In the big scheme of things, they are very far down the list of things that will kill you. We drive every day, that concerns me more than bears.

    I live next to Glacier Nat Park, and I have seen lots of bear sign, a few griz, and a few blacks. When I am off traipsing through the forest, I carry a Winchester defender stoked with Brenneke slugs. I carry it for a couple of reasons, first is for protection from 2 and 4 legged critters. Second is for food in case I have to spend a few more days than I planned for out in the woods. So, along with the slugs, I have a few bird shot shells with me for mr tree rat or bunny rabbit.

    What worrys me when I am out in the woods is moose. Those things can be mean, they will stomp you and then go back to eating grass while you lay there in a bloody pile. Thankfully we don't have as many of them as some other states, but they are out there.

    bob
     
  25. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired Member

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    All you really seem to need is a log...

    Link to full story

     
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