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Publicly Traded Firearms Companies?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by HK G3, Feb 26, 2009.

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  1. HK G3

    HK G3 Member

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    I just wanted to know what firearms manufacturers are publicly traded.

    The only 2 I am aware of are Smith and Wesson (SWHC) and Ruger (RGR)

    Ruger made a nice 15% increase today :D
     
  2. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    Hmmm, an even more interesting question would be is it legal for a prohibited person to possess stock in one of these companies.
     
  3. MAKster

    MAKster Member

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    In general investing in the publicly traded firearms companies has been a bad move. In Oct 2007 S&W was at $20 per share and then dropped to around $1.5. Since the election it has traded around $2.5-3.5. If you're day trading the volatility might allow for some gains but it has been a real loser for the longer term.
     
  4. HK G3

    HK G3 Member

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    Yeah I would not consider a long-term investment with them.

    However, in this volatile market, I've found short term investments to ultimately have the highest yield while still adequately mitigating risk, and that's what I've been doing, and making good money even with the higher taxes.
     
  5. Jorg Nysgerrig

    Jorg Nysgerrig Member

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    Presuming you mean a person prohibited from firearms, I can't imagine why that would be a question at all. Federal laws are rather clear cut on what the definition of what constitutes a firearm and who is prohibited from possessing those item. Last I checked, even the most liberal interpretation would be hard pressed to compare a firearm to shares of stock in a firearm company.

    Perhaps I don't understand the question to which you are referring?
     
  6. CWL

    CWL Member

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    How would an individual owning shares in a publicly-traded company have anything to do with possession of firearms? If you own shares of Boeing does this mean that you can get your hands on a 767?

    Realistically, if you have a job and contribute towards your 401K plan or otherwise invest in mutual funds, it is very likely that some of the funds will be invested in technology companies that manufacture weapons systems like missiles and space componentry. This is where real long-term money will be made.

    If a fund manager has firearms stocks in his portfolio, I'd suggest that you dump this inept manager/fund.
     
  7. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    Technically, if you own one share of stock in a company you own a percentage of that company and it's products. Ergo, a prohibited person owning stock in Smith and Wesson would own a portion of every firearm in stock although not in possession.
     
  8. CWL

    CWL Member

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    That's not really true for publicly traded company stocks (typically called common shares). By ownership of common stock, you agree to give-up the rights to manage the company to elected officers. Your rights are also limited by the amount of shares you hold -so an attempt by you to 'grab a gun' at S&W will be easily voted-out by the other shareholders.

    You cannot show-up and expect to cart away guns just like you cannot expect to access a Boeing 767 like in my posting above.

    There is separation of management, capital and liability between investors and the corporate entity, and this has other benefits for investors: your maximum exposure to losses in the company is only the value of the stock. Creditors cannot sue you if the company goes bankrupt, nor are stockholders liable for class-action judgments where a company may be at fault or negligent.
     
  9. Hk91-762mm

    Hk91-762mm Member

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    My wife is a partner in a class action lawsuit against S+W S=W pulled some tricks that made there stock look good and go to $20+ a share when they were found out the stock went in the potty.. That said I see they went UP alot in the last week !Ill buy a few hunderd again to play with If it goes up another 2 dollars I could double my money---Im using play with money -Ok
     
  10. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    ....And by the twisted logic of Mayor Blomberg, you'd also therefore be an accomplice in every gun related crime !!

    :fire:
     
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