Purchasing new revolver

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by c.dunwoody1234, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. c.dunwoody1234

    c.dunwoody1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2019
    Messages:
    22
    Greetings!

    I’m looking into purchasing a small traditional single action revolver, I’d like to buy something that could be handed down someday. Right now I’m looking at some of the offerings from ruger, either a new bearcat in .22, or the vaquero in .357 mag (I’d shoot .38 special out of it). Another consideration for me is stainless vs blued carbon steel, I would like this firearm to last as long as possible, so any pointer as to what causes guns to wear out faster would be appreciated, thank you.
     
  2. Jack B.

    Jack B. Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2017
    Messages:
    1,908
    Location:
    Cocoa
    Get what you like as far as blued or SS. If you take proper care of it. It shouldn't really matter. I've seen blued guns that were almost 100 years old that still looked like new.
     
  3. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    26,077
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    I agree, take proper care of your gun and it won't matter.

    Just a suggestion, if you are looking at the Ruger Bearcat you might want to consider the Ruger Single-Six or Single -Six convertible. The latter comes with both .22lr and .22 Mag cylinders.
    https://ruger.com/products/newModelSingleSixConvertible/models.html
    There is also the fairly new Single-Ten which holds 10 rounds of .22lr.
    https://ruger.com/products/newModelSingleSixSingleTen/models.html

    The reason is, the Bearcat is a smaller frame revolver usually meant for small hands like children for their first pistol. Many adults find it small in their hand and even though you want to pass it on they will grow up lol.

    Just my 2¢
     
  4. tcj

    tcj Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2012
    Messages:
    353
    How traditional are you trying to be? FWIW - I wanted something similar (except for me, not to hand down) and went with a Cimarron (Uberti) 1873 5.5" blued with case hardened (color) receiver. The only non-traditional part is that the hammer is only 3 rather than 4 clicks due to the safety. Only reason I didn't go with a Ruger is that I didn't want the transfer bar...I think that it looks more traditional when you see a firing pin on the hammer.
     
    Keith G and c.dunwoody1234 like this.
  5. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    26,077
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    Actually, if he is trying to be traditional he can but the original, a Colt. They are still in production but since the OP didn't mention it I figured he didn't want to spend that much.
     
    c.dunwoody1234 likes this.
  6. c.dunwoody1234

    c.dunwoody1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2019
    Messages:
    22
    Yes I looked into a Colt but can’t justify spending that much right now, I have also heard that the Rugers have nice, overbuilt frames, which appealed to me.
     
  7. BobWright

    BobWright Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,737
    Location:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    I'd go with the Ruger Blackhawk, especially if one can find a Flat Top, in .357 Magnum. The .357 can digest all .38 Special ammunition and remains one of the most versatile revolvers made. As for me, I'd prefer the blued finish. My own Ruger Blackhawk is a three-screw from 1958 vintage and though I've done some cosmetic finishing to it, is still a very competent shooter.

    Bob Wright
     
  8. c.dunwoody1234

    c.dunwoody1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2019
    Messages:
    22
    I guess I was looking into the Vaquero because the fixed sights appealed to me, which one would be more durable for long term use?
     
    J-Bar likes this.
  9. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    8,786
    Location:
    Central Arkansas
    That is strictly a personal preference.
    I prefer adjustable sights because I can always get my point of impact where the sights are.

    As far as durability, if you take reasonable care of the firearm and store it properly you will not have an issue with the durability of adjustable sights.

    And you're right to be thinking of Rugers when thinking of heirlooms. They're over-built and will outlast you and your child in all likelyhood.
     
  10. BullRunBear

    BullRunBear Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,550
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Rimfire: I have a couple of Ruger Single-Sixes but prefer the Single-Ten. Slightly different balance and is more accurate in my hand while keeping the Ruger 'good for generations' quality. Mine is stainless. The Bearcat is way too small for me to handle easily or safely.

    Centerfire: Hard to beat a Blackhawk in 357 magnum. Some come with an extra cylinder for 9mm. Unless you only want fixed sights, look at the Blackhawk. They aren't inexpensive but you'll never have to replace it. (Or your kids or grandkids.)

    Jeff
     
    c.dunwoody1234 likes this.
  11. roscoe

    roscoe Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    2,709
    Location:
    NV
    If you are passing down a gun that might become someone's only firearm, a .357 Blackhawk is hard to beat. If they will live on a boat, then get stainless; otherwise blued is nicer-looking and plenty durable.
     
    c.dunwoody1234 and J-Bar like this.
  12. Scott S

    Scott S Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2019
    Messages:
    34
    Location:
    Pikes Peak region
    If it's going to be ever carried in a holster, go stainless. Hard to go wrong with anything Ruger.
     
    c.dunwoody1234, gotboostvr and J-Bar like this.
  13. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3,745
    Location:
    Springfield, MO
    BFE593C9-320B-463A-8B84-E48FE8C98AD9.jpeg
    It is DAMN frustrating (sorry Moderators hope you will be understanding) when a fixed sight revolver has a point of impact many inches away from point of aim. Like 4 inches left and 6 inches low at 10 yards. I have bought a couple of Vaqueros (fixed sights) with massive differences between POA and POI.

    Unless you are required to use a fixed sight revolver in competition, get one with adjustable sights. You have much more flexibility in finding a load you like and can shoot accurately.

    As others have said, a Ruger Blackhawk in .357 Magnum is a terrific choice.

    Im old, arthritic, and need trifocals to see. But my latest purchase gives me joy— stainless Blackhawk, .357, 6.5 inch barrel.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
  14. WrongHanded
    • Contributing Member

    WrongHanded Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2017
    Messages:
    2,338
    I have to say, I think a stainless Blackhawk in .357 mag/.38 spl is a great way to go.

    Popular cartridges that are easy to find and not terribly expensive. .357 mag can accomplish quite a lot, and almost anyone can shoot .38 spl without discomfort. Wear and rust resistant, so it can handle use or neglect well. All steel (unlikely the aluminum alloy grip frames on the blued models). You won't wear it out, and neither will the next of kin. Safe and rugged design, that's very easy to learn to use. Adjustable sights are worry free for POA/POI adjustments.

    Hmmm, maybe I should get one in .357 too!
     
    ontarget, c.dunwoody1234 and J-Bar like this.
  15. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    26,077
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    I also like the Vaquero. I have an original Vaquero with a Bisley grip in 45 Colt (on top) and 2 New Vaqueros in 38/357, all great guns IMO.

    [​IMG]
     
    czhen, c.dunwoody1234 and jstert like this.
  16. Keith G

    Keith G Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    318
    My thoughts which are worth what you paid for them:

    If your wanting a revolver for shooting outside, and you should since it’s a single action revolver, I recommend blued over stainless. The glare from the sun can be a pain with stainless. Plus blued just looks better.

    Rugers are great and built like a tank, don’t get me wrong. But I’m not really sure you need it since you mention 22 and 38’s if you got the 357. I have a Taylor with a 5.5” barrel that I will never give up. Taylor/Uberti/Cimarron/Great Western will all handle any off the shelf ammo. Unless you are pushing a heavy diet of super hot loads, you don’t need a Ruger. (I will likely get flamed for that).

    Any of the revolvers I mentioned are worthy of handing down. I believe the real value of handing one down is the emotional connection it brings to the new owner. I have guns that were handed down that aren’t high end or even something I would buy normally, but I’d never give them up because they mean something to me.

    So my opinion is get the revolver that makes you want to go shoot it when you look at it. Take care of it, and pass it on when the time is right.
     
  17. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    8,792
    Location:
    South Eastern Illinois
    If I were buying an heirloom (and I have), I would buy a ruger blackhawk. 20190408_191741.jpg
    No doubt in my mind the blackhawk is the most durable yet inexpensive way to go for an heirloom quality lifetime gaurantee single action.
    A vaquero would be just as good.
     
    c.dunwoody1234, J-Bar and jstert like this.
  18. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2005
    Messages:
    3,157
    Location:
    Colorado Front Range
    I could have a 5 1/2" stainless .45 Colt Blackhawk (older full strength platform) for open carry, home defense, and animal defense needs and a NAA Mini in .22 mag for concealed carry needs and realistically be set for my minimum handgun requirements. Don't tell my wife...
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2019
    c.dunwoody1234, jstert and JFrame like this.
  19. jstert

    jstert Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2013
    Messages:
    413
    Location:
    ne and sw
    1338E9E3-3207-4928-8ACD-6D5471D1850D.jpeg 9FF6D5EC-1E6B-4AF4-A1AB-D9BAD84A71F4.jpeg 7CDE8D54-067A-495D-81FA-075A8F12E11A.jpeg

    single action revolver really means ruger for the vast majority of happy campers. single six 22wmr/lr, or blackhawk convertibles 45lc/acp, 357/38/9. since rugers are built like brick outhouses, and come with an excellent warranty, you can be reasonably confident that cheaper used ones will be decent and worthwhile values.
     
    c.dunwoody1234 likes this.
  20. MikeInOr

    MikeInOr Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Messages:
    1,372
    Location:
    Oregon
    I will pretty much will always take a SS gun over a blued gun. Both can be kept equally pristine. SS takes less fussing to keep pristine though, IMHO. Technically, on the Rockwell hardness scale, chrome molly steel is harder than SS.

    I will pretty much always choose adjustable sites over fixed sights.

    If you want a beautiful, hand me down, engineering piece of art I would reccomend looking at a Dan Wesson 715... but it is a DA revolver.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2019
    c.dunwoody1234 likes this.
  21. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    7,631
    Location:
    Virginia
    I would define "traditional" as being a close copy of the Colt SAA. If you want something that's reasonably priced, get a Pietta or a pre-Cattleman II Uberti.
     
    c.dunwoody1234 likes this.
  22. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    23,229
    In a Ruger I would go with a blued Flattop Blackhawk but there are so many different models to choose from it's tough to pick just one!

    Older three screw Blackhawk:

    vwUx8gt.jpg

    Newer Flattop Blackhawk:

    4qJNUJO.jpg

    Older stainless Vaquero:

    nDvCLzV.jpg
     
    c.dunwoody1234 and J-Bar like this.
  23. Keith G

    Keith G Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2018
    Messages:
    318
    I can’t warm up to the Blackhawk, despite its obvious merits. The tall front sight is visually unappealing, and the adjustable rear sight just doesn’t sit well with me on a Single Action.

    I think part of the appeal of SA’s is that they have fixed sights so you have to really put the time in to learn how they shoot and get good with it. Aside from a little filing or bending of the front sight, it should require time in hand to get good. No one else should be able to pick up your SA and shoot it as well as you do, like no one else should be able to make your dog obey commands.
     
    c.dunwoody1234 likes this.
  24. BobWright

    BobWright Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,737
    Location:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    I can't say, I've only had my Ruger .357 sixty-one years and 17,000+ rounds fired through it.

    Bob Wright
     
  25. BobWright

    BobWright Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,737
    Location:
    Memphis, Tennessee

    UNAPPEALING?!?!?

    100_5975_zps8yritz3f.jpg

    Bob Wright
     
    czhen, Coyote3855, Beach Bum and 4 others like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice