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Python vs. Model 27-2 for shooting

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by bushmaster1313, Feb 9, 2011.

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  1. bushmaster1313

    bushmaster1313 Member

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    The Pythons have gotten very pricey and a lot of them are advertised as "minty" or "LNIB"

    The Model 27's are lower in price, more available, and a lot of them actually appear to have been put through their paces at the range.

    Am I correct that a 3.5 inch Model 27-2 is better deal than a 4" Python if my goal is fun at the range?
     
  2. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    The Smith is heavier and cheaper.

    Since you are not carrying it the weight is not a primary issue. Being as how it is cheaper go with Smith. Besides, if it breaks you can buy parts anywhere.
     
  3. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    You can still get the S&W fixed for a sane price, and they still make parts for it.
     
  4. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    And, most of the internal parts interchange with the 29's and other "N" frames, so that = parts forever!

    Bottom line is, i've heard of Pythons having timeing/reliability problems when shot a huge amount, yet the old 27's just don't have that problem. Back when i was heavy into competition shooting i owned 3 or 4 Pythons, and they were not as smooth or as nice to shoot as my old 27's, so the Pythons are long gone, and my two 27's are still here and have won a lot of long range matches.

    The oldest 357 mag. "N" frames were/are the finest revolvers ever built, and well worth seeking out.

    DM
     
  5. chuckfw

    chuckfw Member

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    Still have two Pythons left in my safe, and I still enjoy shooting them both. I do like the S&W 27, but the Python is and always will be "King" of the revolvers. Tighter cylinder lockup when the trigger is pulled. For both guns... they are sturdy, parts are available if needed, accurate and reliable. The Python has the sharper looks and is more in demand. That seems to be a lot of bull about the Python having timing and reliability problems.... just not true. In fact, with the tightening of the cylinder when the trigger is pulled, it will outshoot the 27. To answer your question.... while both are fun at the range, the Python is the more desirable, that's why the higher price.
     
  6. brnmuenchow

    brnmuenchow Member

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    "Python" is the best ever, however if you are doing high volume shooting get the Smith you won't cry as bad when something wears out. The Python is great but it is expensive even used like most are. I actually run .38Spl. through mine from time to time when I am running through the round's.
     
  7. savit260

    savit260 Member

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    I'm a Python guy myself, however don't overlook the S&W 586. This is a more comparable revolver to the Python IMO. Not quite as "Premium" as the 27 or Python, but size and function wise, pretty close to the Python for a lot less money.
     
  8. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    That sure hasn't been my experience! I've shot in a lot of long range pistol matches, i won 13 in a row, and i never lost to a Python, not even one time. On top of that, i owned Pythons, and i assure you, if they outshot my 27's i would have switched in a heart beat!

    Pythons sure weren't king where i lived, or in any circles i shot in...

    DM
     
  9. pdawg.shooter

    pdawg.shooter Member

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    My 4" blue Python (1961 vintage) has many thousand full power rounds through it and it is still tighter than any new S&W I have ever owned. I woldn't trade it for ANY other revolver.
     
  10. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    Guys,

    The OP was asking specifically about a range toy. Let us not turn this into another Python battle.

    We all know how they go

    "Pythons are best"

    "are not"

    "Are too"

    "Pythons are fragile"

    "Are not"

    "are too"



    Different tools for different jobs.

    A Model 27 would be an outstanding range toy.
    Easier to find parts for which is important for his application.
    Require less of an investment which would free up money for ammo.
    Anyone can work on a Smith.
     
  11. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    I have to be a contrarian.

    Colts are made to be shot.

    S&W's are made to be collected.

    I shoot my Python a ton compared to the rounds I put down my Pre-27's. Good 5 screw S&W's are rare and nice ones like I would buy are rarer still. I would not shoot my collector pieces much at all.

    Pythons are common (at least here in Texas). If I wanted one this afternoon, I could go to any of 3 local gun stores and have at least 3 in each store to pick from. I know of only one store that has any selection of Pre-27's ready to buy. Even they only have one or two worth considering.

    Nope, Python's are shooter guns. Easy to come by, easy to shoot.

    Besides, the dang things are accurate!

    [​IMG]

    50 shots, 15 yrds offhand.
     
  12. bushmaster1313

    bushmaster1313 Member

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    Got the 27-2
    272.gif
     
  13. Shear_stress

    Shear_stress Member

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    Good on ya. Hard to turn down a gun like that.
     
  14. Jenrick

    Jenrick Member

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    Peter M. Eick: Pythons down Austin-San Antonio way aren't too common. If you can find that many in Houston, can you shoot me a PM on where to track some down out there? I'd love to have a 4" or 6" blued Python shooter.

    -Jernick
     
  15. 351 WINCHESTER

    351 WINCHESTER Member

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    Back in the day's when leo's carried revolvers a python would need a "tune up" with about 500 rounds of magnums. My brother had a very nice one that was superbly accurate. For a shooter the 27 beats it hands down. I knew a guy who hit a bg in the head with his python and the cylinder flew open.
     
  16. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I've got a nearly 40 year old Python that gets shot often, locks up fine, and is still in time. I shoot it plenty and mostly with mid to full power magnums. It still shoots ragged one hole groups in the right hands. If it ever needs repair, I'll send it to Colt. They still work on 'em everyday.

    If I were the OP, I'd skip the "minty" and LNIB guns and look for a nice shooter, preferrably wearing the original grips and with a good finish. That kind of gun can be used and enjoyed without the worry of hurting it's value like those minty and LNIB guns.....Unless you grossly overpay, your money is gonna be safe. Colt DA revolvers only keep climbing in value.
     
  17. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    "Back in the day's when leo's carried revolvers a python would need a "tune up" with about 500 rounds of magnums."

    My father was a Virginia State Trooper during the years after WWII. He was a Python owner and shooter too in later years. I read him your statement. He said, "That's not right.

    Heck, I'm still shooting his favorite Python.

    John
     
  18. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    Original grips and a good finish are what make Pythons and M27s minty.
     
  19. JustinL

    JustinL Member

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    A lot depends on what kind of trigger pull you prefer. I don't know the appropriate adjectives to describe the differences between them but I would recommend you at least take that into consideration.
     
  20. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    Also, don't forget to see if you prefer to "easily" give the cylinder release a little "push" with your thumb (S&W), or go into the awkward movement of having to "pull" the cylinder release to open the cylinder. (python)

    How about keeping the dirt/lint and rust out from under that rib too?

    DM
     
  21. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    IMO, "minty" means it looks like brand new....You can have a good finish and have still some honest wear. I have several shooters that have a really nice original finish and original grips, but I would not call them being in mint condition or describe them as "like new". They are really nice looking guns, but are not "like new"....That's the trouble with lots of the ads you see in places like GB. People are describing used guns as museum quality pieces and pricing them like they are, when they are really just well maintained used guns.
     
  22. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    I understand what you are saying completely and wholeheartedly agree with your final sentence. That is kind of the joke I was making above.

    All M27s and Pythons are probably too high right now for that very reason. They are trying to sell them for LNIB prices when they are only well maintained shooters. Nonetheless there is no way of getting them within a reasonable price bracket.

    I think the 3 1/2" Nickel M27 at a local shop here for 875 is not such a bad price for what I usually see the 3 1/2s go for. It is still probably high though.
     
  23. Hanshi

    Hanshi Member

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    I have a Python, M27 & M28. All were purchased eons ago when they were actually "cheap". All get shot occasionally, especially the Python but I hold all three in high regard. There is little difference in weight among the three so that's pretty much irrelevant. Quality is equal; pretty and price are not.
     
  24. halfmoonclip

    halfmoonclip Member

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    Back in the day, there were 'Colt guys' and 'Smith' guys, and neither would be caught dead saying a kind word about the other. Both viewed Ruger as an usurper and a maker of Kalashnikov revolvers. I was a Smith guy, and still see them as the way to go. I minty Big Snake would be fun, tho'...
    Colt has gotten out of the double action revo business for reasons only known to themselves; lack of a modern .40 something frame may be some of it. The marketing moves at Hartford always keep you guessing, and pondering, and swearing....there have been times I'm not sure they want to sell guns at all, at least to civilians.
    Moon
     
  25. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Alledgedly Colt is coming back with a DA in the future, but it will not be a Python....Yeah, I know that rumor circulates around every year or two, but I recently heard it from a supposed inside source.
     
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