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Quality of Mid-Priced Knives

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by 460Shooter, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I'll look into all of those and see what I can find. I didn't really bother looking much last weekend as I was first trying to figure out where to start. My locality may make it hard to find. But I think paying for a few personal or weekend classes would be worth it with a little travel involved if need be. Seems silly to not pursue it seriously since I have absolutely no training. Otherwise I'll just be some jackass waving a stick around.
     
  2. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    In your case a pointy stick.

    The simplest non-firearm defensive tool is chemical sprays. Sticks in their various forms, from a short flashlight to a full length Jo are very versatile and hide well in plain sight, but require training and practice. I've taught several people how to use a cane and had a couple contact me to tell me of their success "staving" off attacks. A knife is very portable and has use closed as well as open as a short impact weapon. That still requires training and so does the use of the blade if you want to be quick and skilled and as effective as possible.
     
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  3. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I suppose it's better than a 2x4 with a nail in it. :D

    Believe it or not, I'm not allowed to have that at work either. And yet, a pointed stick, effectively a short spear, is fine. Guess who I work for?

    You know it's funny, most mornings when I drive through town to get to my office I see an older gentleman out for a walk. He's usually trucking along pretty good, but what always caught my attention is that he is carrying a cane in one hand horizontally. Essentially he isn't using it as a cane at all.

    It dawned on me this morning when I saw him it's most likely because he is carrying it for defense rather than mobility assistance. Duh.
     
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  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    A cane umbrella, like Arfin mentioned, is a great excuse to carry a cane most places.
     
  5. bubba in ca

    bubba in ca Member

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    I carry a stout cane in one neighborhood for loose dogs. Somewhere along the line I found that if you tap the end of the stick on the pavement that translates into dog language as "he sees me and doesn't want to be bothered".
     
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  6. lemaymiami

    lemaymiami Member

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    For walking sticks that can actually take some serious abuse... you might want to do a bit of research on blackthorn walking sticks. They have the desirable quality of not looking like a defensive item as well.

    My Dad in his later years favored a stout green bamboo stick about four feet in length usually kept at his front door. He pointed out that it was nearly unbreakable and very lightweight which made it very fast in your hands. In a confrontation speed and maneuverability is pretty important...
     
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  7. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I actually did a bit of blackthorn Googling. Given my age I think it’ll stand out a bit more than I care for. However, as I get older I’ll probably incorporate one into my routine for different occasions. The above linked Cold Steel ones are interesting.
     
  8. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Interesting. I wonder if they simply don't understand what the sound is and it makes them warry enough to get out of there.
     
  9. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    :barf:
     
  10. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Ok, maybe not those. :D

    Care to elaborate? Blackthorns in general or those black thorns?
     
  11. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Plastic "blackthorns" are ...:barf:

    Real blackthorns...:thumbup:

    BTW, most internet blackthorns are something other than blackthorn. Proper blackthorn stick should be made from the root and trunk as opposed to branch. The branches are far thornier than the trunk (as a forrester you may know this already). Therefore, a "proper" blackthorn stick is a lot smoother than the ones you see about.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2019
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  12. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Ok. Makes sense. And yes, you wouldn’t want a staff/stick made from a branch. Structurally sound wood from nearly any species comes from the trunk.
     
  13. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Think professionally of saplings that would make a perfect defensive cane start. Tough, resilient, heavy, dense, straight, hardness, stiff, and strength with a solid root ball. What do we have besides hickory in N. America?
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2019
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  14. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Did some reading.
    Hickory would definitely work well. Depending on the species, the weight could be more than desired. Bitternut hickory is a very dense and heavy wood.

    A few oaks would probably work well also. White ash might, but tends to be a pretty light wood compared to how strong it is. May not be optimal. I'm curious about eastern hophornbeam (ironwood). We have a bit of that locally. It'd be fun to harvest one and see what I could do with it. It typically grows very straight, is incredibly strong, and the reason it doesn't get more industrial use is it doesn't get terribly big, but more importantly trying to drive a nail into it is quite difficult. It earns its name. May be a bit heavy though too.

    Ok, you've convinced me. No fake-thorns. Of course, I'm of Irish lineage also. So plastic would be an offense to my forefathers. Really wish I'd thought this out and bought one when I was in Ireland a few years ago.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
  15. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Sadly, most of those aren't likely to be real. Takes 2 years of seasoning for a stout shileileigh and then some hand rubbing. Most sold to tourists are Rowen, good, or apple, not bad.
     
  16. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Yeah, I just found an article with a genuine stick maker and he talked about just that. He noted the same. Fortunately he has a website and online store. Seems legit.

    Now I'm almost ashamed as a forester that I considered a plastic stick. I guess I was being cheap.

    Any knowledge of this guy? Based on the words here and the article I read dated from 2018, these appear to be the real deal.
    https://mccaffreycrafts.com/
     
  17. Boattale

    Boattale Member

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    I have a hickory walking stick that I cut one day out mushroom hunting about 40 years ago now. Peeled the bark and it's got several coats now of BLO. Has a perfect fork for holding down a snake and for thumb rest. The fork makes it especially handy for dragging something that has migrated to the front of the truck bed too. Little John knew how to use a staff. An inspiring fellow. I love my stick. It is always in the truck.

    stick.jpg

    Hackberry comes to mind as a contender. If there was such a thing as a straight persimmon sapling, it would be good too. Can't see where a good white oak or post oak sapling would be a problem either.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2019
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  18. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Hadn't thought of that one. You are blessed with a variety of hardwoods to choose from. I live in a western pine forest. None of the deciduous species we have here, with the exception of the aforementioned ironwood would be a good choice.

    Sometimes, every once in a while, I miss the east.
     
  19. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Bikerdoc has gathered hornbeam.

    Osage is good.

    I'm surrounded by hickory and have several staves cured over 5 years
     
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  20. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    If I were starting with essentially no knives and considering something possibly for self defense, I would go with a small fixed blade such as the Dozier Companion or Personal with Bob's most excellent kydex cross draw sheath. It is worn on the belt and not very noticeable with casual dress. Form there it is familiarity of where the knife is, perhaps some training on defensive use of a knife, and some time to become accustomed to a knife on your belt. With fixed blades, there is no action to open in a crisis. I would go with something pretty traditional in terms of design at first until you're comfortable with a knife. AG Russell sells Dozier knives (handmade stuff usually in D2 steel).

    A cane is a good choice. There is one company that sells air craft aluminum canes that I have been considering getting.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
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  21. Boattale

    Boattale Member

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    Dozier personal is a great knife. The kydex sheath really is excellent as you mention.

    personal.jpg
     
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  22. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

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    The one I made and use is an Osage root knob and sapling trunk. Works for me... :)
     
  23. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    With a cane, I think the ball head is the best for self defense but may be a bit weak for actual using as a cane.... Always looking for opinions on this... This is something I have been pondering with the aluminum cane. I don't want to break the head swinging it, but all the same, I like something that I find functional also. I have used a cane when I twisted my knee a while back, but it was a cheapie. It worked though, but I suspect it would break if I swung it real hard.

    A cane is not a walking stick, but I suppose it's certainly better than nothing as an extra leg in the woods.
     
  24. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I don’t think a cane should be discounted as less effective than a walking stick. It avails hooking and pulling as another defensive option. A hooked leg or other appendage is a vulnerable appendage. But I am under qualified for my opinion to really matter at this point.

    I’m honestly considering buying a Black Thorn and in the distant future, a cane.

    Training needs to happen before, to see it if it fits, but the more I read the more I realize a knife is more of a last ditch than a stick.

    My entire thought process has really flip flopped and evolved. The thread title is kind of meaningless now.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
  25. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    https://www.solidaluminumcane.com/apps/webstore/

    @460Shooter These are the aluminum canes that I am considering but I can't make up my mind on the head. They also have seconds which they discount. I suppose the worst thing that could happen is I buy one and don't like it. But I have been messing around with canes for a while now.

    I looked at the Irish Blackthorn canes and after seeing the aluminum ones above, I pretty much punted on the Blackthorn.

    There is no question that a walking stick is an effective defensive weapon. I would just feel funny walking around town with a walking stick plus they are not medical devices. There is a difference in length between a walking stick versus a cane.

    I see that the aluminum cane folks are coming out with more handles. I am leaning toward a traditional C type.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2019
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