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Quality of Mid-Priced Knives

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by 460Shooter, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Those aluminum ones do look pretty effective and very nicely made.
     
  2. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Just providing options. I noticed they have a three handle set now.... costs more but for undecided folks like me, that might be a good choice perhaps. They might be a bit chilly to hold on a frosty morning. Bike handle bar tape would probably minimize that. These canes are not cheap. I also worry about the proper length as you have to cut them to your length.
     
  3. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Finding proper length is very easy. Measure from your wrist with your arm hanging comfortably at your side to the ground. I generally just flip the cane upside down and mark the end of the shaft where it reaches the wrist to shorten them.
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Most of mine are crooks like those "C" handles based on the Cane Masters designs. I buy hickory stock canes, cut the crooks for a sharp tip used for control and hooking, and then groove them for a solid grip. They've held up to a lot of practice abuse on heavy bags and mook jungs.
     
  5. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    I personally am a huge fan of canvas micarta, which is heavier than any wood. Paper micarta can also work, but you may have to lightly scuff it with sandpaper, so it's not too slick, and you get carpet burn on your palms.

    3 foot sticks/canes should be at least .75, but no more than 1". Longer staves should be 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 (which is massive, but hits very, very hard.)

    John
     
  6. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Why the diameter limit on canes? Seems as long as it’s not wider than would facilitate a firm grip you’d have a stronger stick with a bit more weight. I can see how excessive weight could slow you down though.

    I’m missing something.

    By the way, I appreciate the tolerance of thread drift from the mods. This one has gone all over the place.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
  7. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm interested in hearing the reasoning to this also. I have an idea, but not the experience to address it with any level of expertise.

    I'm thinking it is the same reason that people often pick handguns which feel comfortable in their hands in the store and only find out after some training in gripping technique that it is too large for an optimal grip
     
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  8. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    I just ordered one of those aluminum canes. Thanks enablers.
     
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  9. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    Any time. :D Let us know what you think of it.
     
  10. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    Canes aren't very heavy, so you need just enough thickness for strength and to get a good grip. You DO want to be able to generate a lot of speed.

    With 4' and longer staves, you have a substantially larger weapon, so you don't depend on tip speed for damage. You want a larger diameter for more impact and strength, since leverage increases with length.

    John
     
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  11. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    You got the concept, just think about the fact that weight, length, balance, texture/adhesion/friction, geometry are important.
     
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  12. Boattale

    Boattale Member

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    My stick is 57" from the butt to the bottom of the fork. His walking sticks are 51" long max unless I am missing something. Leprecaun length for us modern sized North Americans. But dang his stuff looks quality, I couldn't break anything I saw on the website.
     
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  13. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    So a curiosity question again about the diameter limit. Would that limit increase slightly for an above average sized person with XL hands?

    The balance, weight, speed, and grip notions make sense to me, but like 9mmepiphany mentioned, grip sizes in guns need to vary to suit the user. Just curious if that concept carries through in a cane also aside from the length. Or is it a pretty hard and fast rule among the experienced folks that 0.75-1.0” are really the limits?

    They look high quality and he claims they are authentic but who knows. I don’t have any expertise on the topic.

    Yep, if you want a staff, that’s not the place to get it. Just sticks of different sizes. Beautiful stuff though.
     
  14. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    I have itty little pickpocket/stiletto mits while a buddy can palm a basketball. Go to the hardware big box and try a range of dowel diameters to find out if there is a comfortable range that fits your grip. You want to be able to fully close your hand without the grip be less than secure from too thick or too thin material. Think about how the right diameter tool is less likely to cause hot spots or slip out of your hand.
     
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  15. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    With regard to canes, I am looking for functionality as a cane first and defensive weapon second. I don't have big hands and I'm generally comfortable with the handle sizes you see on standard medical canes. I'm sure there will be thickness preferences that may develop, but I don't know if I have enough experience to make an intelligent decision in that regard. My suspicion is that I would be comfortable with any normal handle thickness. My sense is to "go with the flow" and make adjustments in preference down the road just like most of us do with knives.

    I also suspect that I like a slightly longer cane length than hso suggested..... that is the problem with choosing. It's one thing to get what you consider inexpensive and just use it, but when the price tag goes up, you want it to work the first time around.

    When I think about canes, I always think about the original movie "Miracle on 34th Street" and city use.
     
  16. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Which one specifically did you get?
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  17. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    Just for clarity, I'm referring to folks who pick guns which are too large because it "fills their hand".

    As hso posted, you want to be able to close your hand with full contact for security. Handgun fit is a bit different
     
  18. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Yes of course. It’s two very different applications with very different pieces of equipment.

    It’s certainly an issue if a person goes too big with a gun and I can see how the concept applies here also. I almost think it’s more important in this application since it’s not like you can change out your cane grip for a larger or smaller size.

    I imagine too large could lead to a less than optimal grip which in the worst case scenario could mean your stick is taken from you and used against you. Too small and you loose strength.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
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  19. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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  20. JShirley

    JShirley Administrator Staff Member

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    Aside from speed/impact/grip concerns, a "cane" much thicker than 1" will look out of place, since clearly an inch is plenty strong for support. The most famous Japanese stickfighting school also uses 3' sticks in ways that will be difficult to perform if too thick.

    I love very powerful manual weapons, and I used to have a staff that weighed nearly 5 lbs. Trust me when I say you definitely don't need a piece of micarta more than an inch, when you're talking about 39" or less length (39" is my preferred cane length).

    Again, once you move up to jo (4') length, thicker is fine, though if you choose micarta or G10, even an inch will be plenty heavy, and more than strong enough. One of my big weapon regrets is selling a 74" handmade canvas micarta staff when I joined the Army. I'd immediately buy it back for $300 without hesitation if I could.
     
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  21. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    The $80 shiny Fall special with two handles.
     
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