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Question about reload bench location

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by phantom45, Apr 27, 2007.

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  1. phantom45

    phantom45 Member

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    Apr 18, 2007
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    Location:
    Alabama
    Sorry for the newbie question here, hope it hasn't been covered too much before didn't find anything via a search. I'm seriously considering getting into reloading my own ammo. I plan on ordering some books soon to begin researching it further before making that leap, as I want to go into these things knowledgeably. I have been considering possible locations for me to setup my reload bench when I'm ready and I have some questions.

    My house is rather small and room is limited. I do have a small "shed" type building behind my house, and we live on a farm so access to a barn etc might be feasible. Would having your bench open to the environment (ie no climate control) be an issue at all? I'm not sure if heat or humidity (bad here in Alabama) would effect the reloading process or not, and thought it best to ask before I make further plans. Any advice you might have would be most helpful.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Matt Dillon

    Matt Dillon Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Welcome, phantom45! You are making a wise decision by choosing to read quite a bit before beginning to reload. I would advise going to the library and checking out the ABCs of reloading and other reloading manuals (Speer, Sierra, Lee etc.)before beginning to load your first round.
    To get to your question, you could certainly use your shed as your reloading area, but it is best to store your components, e.g. primers and powder, as well as finished rounds, in a climate controlled environment. Heat and humidity will adversely affect the longevity of your components, and while you can load out in the shed, it would be best to store your components in the AC.
     
  3. longrifleman

    longrifleman Member

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    Wide swings in temp can be a problem. One way to judge your potential location is to compare it to other high quality tool storage. If your cast iron table saw is rusting in a given location, then your dies will probably rust there also. Scales and such don't like dust and bird poop.

    My first set-up was in a small shop building and I constantly fought to keep things in good shape. Powder and primers weren't too hard to keep sealed up tight enough to work ok.

    The shop burned and solved my problem for a few years. Before the fire, I had decided that I was going to have to build a cabinet and heat it, pretty much the way welding rod is kept. Since I never got it done, I can't vouch for the concept. Might be worth considering if you can't find a better place.
    Dessicant in a cabinet might work as well. Good luck.
     
  4. Idano

    Idano Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
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    933
    phantom45,

    The location, temperature, and humidity where you do your reloading isn't as critical as to where you store your powder and primers. Those compo nets need to be kept cool and dry. I originally started out in a tool shed under a carport with no heat or air conditioning so I only reloaded when the weather was decent. I think a barn would be just fine, in fact a house we are looking at moving to has a tack shed an since I don't have horses I am thinking it would make a nice reloading room. Yep a little installation, a gas wall furnace out of an old trailer, and a window mount air conditioner and I'll be in the life of luxury.
     
  5. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    Dies and the ram on your press may rust pretty fast. Powder likes to pick up humidity.
     
  6. creekwalker

    creekwalker Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Middle TN
    The use of a shed or barn for setting up a reloading bench is not a bad ides at all depending upon your outside temperatures and humidity, as has already been mentioned. Eventually I’ll move my setup out of my basement to a comfortably sized combination project workshop my wife and I are planning. One thing to consider on an outbuilding is, will it allow you enough interior room to set up a bench for your equipment and does it have electrical hook ups inside of it for lighting and accessories and can you hook up an air conditioner or heater for interior climate control.
    If not you should reevaluate your options and consider another approach such as a portable reloading table. Or perhaps consider setting up a folding bench inside of one of your closets. If you haven’t figured out by now that your options are unlimited than relax, they are. You’ve already taken your first steps in research, keep it up and read relevant literature, than buy some equipment and get started.

    creekwalker
    :)
     
  7. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    Can you or do you have room in that barn to build a small room and is there electricity to that barn so you can power an A/C and your other power tools used in reloading?:)
     
  8. phantom45

    phantom45 Member

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    Location:
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    Sadly no. Similar situation with my shed behind my house. It has some electricity and a small gas heater but no air conditioning and it gets brutally hot in the summer. And there is no way to mount even a small air conditioner in there. The barn in question has no electricity at all and no heat. So yeah I guess that is out unless I can talk some friends or family members into donating some space :) Some friends and I are actually considering splitting the cost of a reloading setup to reload for our 3 calibers.
     
  9. DaveInFloweryBranchGA

    DaveInFloweryBranchGA Member

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    phantom45,


    Sorry for the newbie question here, hope it hasn't been covered too much before didn't find anything via a search.

    Don't apologize for asking an honest question.

    "I'm seriously considering getting into reloading my own ammo. I plan on ordering some books soon to begin researching it further before making that leap, as I want to go into these things knowledgeably."

    I suggest you read this sticky at the top of the forum. It lists several good books and other things to think about before you spend money in order to buy things you'll need for your type of shooting vs. unnecessary items.

    "I have been considering possible locations for me to setup my reload bench when I'm ready and I have some questions. My house is rather small and room is limited."


    "I do have a small "shed" type building behind my house, and we live on a farm so access to a barn etc might be feasible. Would having your bench open to the environment (ie no climate control) be an issue at all? I'm not sure if heat or humidity (bad here in Alabama) would effect the reloading process or not, and thought it best to ask before I make further plans. Any advice you might have would be most helpful."

    I don't know where in Alabama you live, but based on the time I lived there, I wouldn't want my expensive reloading equipment, powder, primer and associated tools exposed to that humidity. It'll certainly rust it and ruin the powder, even when you're careful, because it'll do it here in Atlanta, much less where you're at.

    What I would suggest instead is a "roll away" cart you can keep your gear on. That way, you can roll the cart out and use it in "whichever" room is available, then roll it back into a closet or corner out of the way. I lived in a 900 square foot apartment and used a steel cart sold at Sam's Club for around $50.00 or so. I cut two sections of 3/4" plywood and bolted them to the top of the cart. I built a sturdy mount out of oak board and centered it in the middle of the plywood so the press didn't stick out on the sides. This allowed me to move it around the apartment without banging the press on things.

    The cart's shelves held a good bit of my tools and I was able to roll it out, get out my stool and go to work, then roll it back into a storage area. Worked great and was plenty sturdy enough to run my Hornady Lock N Load progressive on.

    I think this may be your best solution. I have also used a Black and Decker workmate and bolted a press mounted to a 2 X 12 onto the top as well. I like the cart solution better.

    Regards,

    DAve
     
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