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question from new guy to revolvers

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by paulgl26, Sep 11, 2008.

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  1. paulgl26

    paulgl26 Member

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    i have a new Taurus 85ul
    i always had auto so my question is can you dry fire this gun like a glock or you need a dummy round (snap cap)
    thanks
     
  2. nate.45

    nate.45 Member

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    As a general rule, it will not harm a centerfire revolver by dry firing it.
     
  3. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Like said above, usually you will not harm a centerfire revolver but if you are going to do A LOT of dry firing it's probably a very good idea you pick up a set of snap caps. BTW, some "dummy rounds" used to practice reloading and such aren't always the same as snap caps. Make sure you get the correct product. I know there's a difference because I have both.

    Since you're new to revolvers you might want to practice reloading with speedloaders or speed strips. ST Action Pro makes dummy rounds which mimic real ammo in both size and weight for practicing reloading. (they have a brightly colored bullet to prevent mistaking them for live ammo) They are a good addition to snap caps IMO.
     
  4. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Don't bet on it! In the case of the Taurus 85UL you may not break the firing pin but you can mash the firing pin spring and ruin it if there isn't something such as a snap-cap in the chamber. To some degree this is true in any revolver that has a frame mounted firing pin. There is usually a shoulder on the pin that is suppose to stop excessive forward movement, but this can batter the firing pin bushing, if there is one.

    The Old Fuff has replaced enough broken firing pins and/or springs to take the manufacturers' claims about dry firing with a grain of salt.

    Dry firing is an excellent way to smooth out an action, and it won't have any negative effect on the warrantee, where "polishing" often does. But a set of quality snap-caps is inexpensive insurance you won't have trouble later.
     
  5. kle

    kle Member

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    I'm right with you there, Old Fuff--I've broken every single gun I've owned, and it's usually the firing pin (and most recently, the hammer-nose on my recently-acquired 686-1M) that breaks because it takes the most stress.

    Now, whenever I pick up another gun (in a caliber I don't have already) I'll pick up some snap-caps to go with it. Or I save spent .22 casings for my rim-fires.

    And when the manual for my Taurus 905 says "it is not safe to dryfire this gun" they mean it--the firing pin broke the second day I owned the gun from a lot of dryfiring. I wised up and started using snapcaps...and then the transfer bar broke. Now I almost never dryfire the thing except maybe once every two weeks, just to remember how heavy the double-action pull is.
     
  6. bluewater

    bluewater Member

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    Dry firing is recommended for high quality revolvers such as S&W. Not sure about Taurus revolvers because of their lower quality.
     
  7. indiandave

    indiandave Member

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    I'm with Old Fuff. Snap caps are cheap insurance. The 85 UL is a nice gun. If you like it thats what counts.
     
  8. Stainz

    Stainz Member

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    Actually, the extreme movement of a frame mounted fp in a S&W is limited by a notch on said fp hitting the securing pin, which is held in at the top of the sideplate by it's lip. In fact, an 'extended fp' has a slightly wider gap, making it's limits 'greater' - and it might just flatten the fp spring. The fp isn't longer - just it's 'range'. The fp and spring are a relatively easy replacement.

    Stainz

    PS Snap caps are cheap, if they make you feel better. They are required with a rimfire, of course.
     
  9. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    Just once, once, I would like to see a post mentioning a Taurus product without some S&W fan having to make a disparaging remark. I have owned several of both, and I have yet to have problem one with either revolver. And I do not dry fire either the Tauruses or the S&Ws without snap caps. And I have seen broken firing pins in plenty of S&Ws from not using them over the years, and a few broken pins and transfer bars in Tauruses too.
     
  10. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I have replaced broken firing pins and mashed springs in both S&W and Taurus revolvers. I have also experienced satisfactory service from both brands. The issue here (dry firing with or without snap caps) has more to do with extra insurance against a weapon failure at a critical time, rather then the merits of a particular make or model.
     
  11. Elvishead

    Elvishead Member

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    Did you read the manual, or are you lazy?
     
  12. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Ah... Did who read what manual?:confused:
     
  13. Stainz

    Stainz Member

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    I got scared when I read the bold red writing on pg 18 of the current S&W manual... it said "WARNING: THE FIREARM WILL FIRE WHEN THE TRIGGER IS PULLED!". That frightened me.

    In all seriousness, a call to S&W Customer Service will reveal that the centerfire cartridge revolvers can be dry-fired. I don't know how many I've dry-fired 1,000-1,500+ times to break-in - or advised others to do - without any problems.

    I don't know if that is a safe practice with a Taurus - a check with their manual may give the answer. Perhaps a call to their Miami office, if your Spanish is good - or to Brazil, if your Portuguese is better - would yield an answer.

    As to Taurus vs S&W - I went with S&W due to the 'Made in USA' factor - and, more importantly, because every neato looking and inviting Taurus I've seen is ported - a deal breaker to me. I think they'd port slingshots, if they made them...

    Stainz
     
  14. paulgl26

    paulgl26 Member

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    thanks guys ill get snap caps
    i read the manual and nothing
     
  15. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I've owned a number of Taurus revolvers, including my favorite .44 Special snubby - a gun that S&W didn't make, except on an oversized L frame. None of them were ported. I don't like porting either.

    S&W says that it's safe to dry fire they're revolvers. But if you push the issue and ask, "Does that mean that the firing pin won't break, not ever?" You'll get an answer along the lines of, "No, but if it does break we'll fix it."

    This would be fine, unless the revolver was kept, used or carried as a weapon. When that is the case the whole issue becomes much more important - at least to me.

    Using snap-caps in either make of gun will substantually reduce the chance of having a spring get mashed, or a pin broken. I consider my neck to be worth much more then the cost of a set of snap-caps, but I'm not sure that the folks at S&W (or for that matter, Taurus) feel that way.

    Sometimes common sense is a lot better then what's printed in the user's manual.

    Incidentally, new Colt Single Action Army revolvers come with a manual that says, "DO NOT SHOOT THIS REVOLVER!" and goes on to explain that the gun is met to be a collectors item, and shooting it will reduce the value.

    I know some folks that don't pay attention to that either. ;)
     
  16. qwert65

    qwert65 Member

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    is that for real? WOW
     
  17. Hawk

    Hawk Member

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    Sure is. It's been known to play a part in purchase decisions for those of us that take such things seriously.

    But as noted, most everybody on SASSWire ignores the admonition. If I'd known that a couple years ago I might have bought a Colt before either the Turnbull or STI but that owner's manual for the model 'P' is just plain scary.

    ...if you're a shooter and not a collector.

    If memory serves, you're not even supposed to draw back the hammer. It's intended by the factory for use as safe-ballast.
     
  18. Big Matt

    Big Matt Member

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    +1 to post #9.
     
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