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R-P brass crappy?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Luggernut, Nov 26, 2006.

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  1. Luggernut

    Luggernut Member

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    Here is why I ask. I found a couple hundred rounds of .40 S&W at the range the other day. It "appeared" that they were all fired from the same Glock and were new- primer marks same, etc. My range isn't that busy so I'm fairly certain.

    Anyway- All 100 rounds of Winchester resized just perfectly. A tad under the .424" diameter at the bottom of the body/head area, as in my reloading manuals for .40 S&W. However, ALL the R-G cases were at least .001" over the spec with many at .426". I'm considering tossing the R-P cases but wanted to see if this is normal for R-P brass?
     
  2. griz

    griz Member

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    In a fired case I think that dimension is more dependent on the gun in which it's fired than the brand of brass. I would use it. Brass buzzards (like me:D ) can't be TOO picky.
     
  3. EddieCoyle

    EddieCoyle Member

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    Yeah but if you read the post, he said he resized it before he measured it. Since he resized it, it shouldn't matter what gun fired it.

    Luggernut, I've found the same thing with several calibers of R-P brass including .380, .32 ACP, and 10mm. The case walls are thinner than the others and therefore do not resize with a small enough inside diameter to hold a bullet. If you try to reload these, you'll find that you can't crimp them enough to sufficiently hold a bullet.

    You've got two choices. You can either toss them, or get an Evolution Gun Works (EGW) undersized resizing die. This die will squeeze the case a little tighter and get it to hold a bullet. Another bonus is that you can use them to resize Glock-fired cases. Unfortunately, they only make them for 9mm, .38 Super, 10mm/.40 S&W, and .45. I have to to toss (or sell on eBay) all my R-P .380 and .32 ACP cases.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2006
  4. Steve in PA

    Steve in PA Member

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    R-P is Remington brass. I've never had any problems with ths brass and actually, if I only had to pick one, it would be Remington.
     
  5. Luggernut

    Luggernut Member

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    Thanks Eddie- yes after going thru the resizer die the R-P are still too big. I might give the EGW dies a try- certainly for the .40 S&W- the 9mm and .45ACP don't seem to be as much of an issue for me.
     
  6. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    I presume that the case is being measuring at the bottom of the case web, just above the extractor groove. If so, be aware that this area of the case is not actually resized, which is why the dimension can vary after the sizing operation....

    It's normal to see case head growth over time, and in fact some folks recommend judging load pressure in rifle loads based upon case head growth. In sum, case head diameter is not a static dimension and I'm not sure how much I'd worry about what you're seeing. It certainly won't cause issues with feeding or extraction.
     
  7. Luggernut

    Luggernut Member

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    "I presume that the case is being measuring at the bottom of the case web, just above the extractor groove. If so, be aware that this area of the case is not actually resized, which is why the dimension can vary after the sizing operation.... "

    That is where I am referring to. Since the die I used didn't resize that part of the case (like you said) I'd wonder if it was out of spec to begin with and if not... that's a lot of variation in the head on a once fired case.
     
  8. Steve C

    Steve C Member

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    The only thing you should check is if it will chamber in your pistol, if it will it doesn't matter what the caliper or mic measures. I reloaded handgun and shotgun for some 20 years without owning a caliper or mictometer. My ammo all shot just fine. So after I finally bought a caliper I spent a lot of time measuring stuff that really didn't matter. I think I was happier without all the worry about .001" here or there.
     
  9. EddieCoyle

    EddieCoyle Member

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    I misunderstood. The problem I've had with R-P brass (in specific calibers only) is that after resizing, the case would not adequately hold the bullet. I found the thickness of the brass at the top of the case to be thinner than other headstamps, causing the inside diameter of the case to remain too wide even after resizing.

    I don't load .40 or 9mm, but I've seen it in .32 ACP, .380, and 10mm, as well as .38 Special. I can use the .38's because a roll crimp eliminates possible setback issues. The R-P .45 ACP stuff seems to be fine.
     
  10. Shoney

    Shoney Member

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    Steve C nailed it!!!!!! But why listen to me, I've only been loading for 46 years.
     
  11. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

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    I hate the stuff. Threw all my rp pistol brass out a few years back. Others here like it.

    All I can say is try it and see how it holds up for you.

    I have had trouble specifically in 40 exactly like EddieCoyle posted.
     
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