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Racine County Sheriff's deputy shot while serving warrant (WI)

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by TheeBadOne, Dec 12, 2003.

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  1. TheeBadOne

    TheeBadOne Member

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    RACINE, Wis. - A Racine County Sheriff's deputy was shot Friday morning while serving a search warrant, authorities said.

    At least two deputies were serving the warrant at a north side Racine house at about 5:30 a.m. when shots were fired and a deputy was hit, Police Sgt. William Macemon said.

    The deputy's injuries were not life threatening, Macemon said. It was not known how many times the deputy was hit.

    Macemon said a number of people were arrested, but he did not known how many.

    http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthtribune/7476711.htm
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    Looks like this was a no-knock drug warrant.

    RACINE, Wis. - A Racine County Sheriff's deputy was shot Friday in the foot while serving a search warrant, authorities said.

    A SWAT team of 12 deputies was serving a no-knock warrant at a north side Racine house at about 5:50 a.m. when shots were fired and Deputy David Wawrzyniakowski was hit once in the left foot, said Racine County Sheriff Bob Carlson.

    Wawrzyniakowski, 36, a seven-year department veteran and three-year veteran of the SWAT team, was treated and released from a local hospital, he said.

    "The bullet went all the way through his foot, shattering the bone," Carlson said. "He's in some pain."

    He didn't know how many deputies approached the door. Carlson expected Wawrzyniakowski, of Burlington, to return to full duty in the future.

    Carlson said the warrant was attained by the Racine County Metro Drug Unit, which was searching for evidence of drugs and drug trafficking.

    Two males and a female were arrested, he said. He didn't know their ages and if they lived at the three-family house. The alleged shooter was male.

    He said during a no-knock search warrant deputies are allowed to approach the door and threshold without announcing their presence and can enter without knocking, usually with a battering ram. But when they cross the threshold they have to announce their presence and that was done Friday, Carlson said.

    He said the last time a deputy was shot was about 20 years ago and that person later returned to duty.

    "We were fortunate of the outcome," Carlson said. "If this guy's aim had been a little bit better ... the outcome could have been calamitous."
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2003
  2. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

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    We have a winner for the understatement of the week.
     
  3. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    I can't believe it. This post has been up for hours and there hasn't been one post made blaming the policeman for violating somebody's something or other. I'll check back later.

    John
     
  4. Wildalaska

    Wildalaska member

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    Everybody knows that the war on drugs is a Zionist plot to sap the vitality of the freedom loving midwestern Patriots. They were justified in shooting those jackbooted enemies of the constituion. That will teach the government to interfere in our lives, look what it forced Tim McVeigh to do

    Feel better John, we're back to normal :)

    WildsynapsefailureAlaska
     
  5. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    Well... unfortunately, if they had pulled that at my residence, there is a good chance the outcome would have been worse than a bullet to the foot.

    Those no-knock warrants are walking a thin line.

    If the occupants DON'T intend to harm the officers, there is little chance of ANY shooting happening if the officers identify themselves first.

    OTOH, if the occupants DO intend to harm the officers, identification gives everyone inside a chance to grab their guns and draw down on the door...

    Not to mention the very debateable Constitutionality of the entire concept.:what:
     
  6. rayjay

    rayjay Member

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    I wonder if the officer shot his own foot:uhoh: . It could happen:eek:
     
  7. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    I am really sorry the officer got shot in the foot.

    (there, now does that make anyone feel better?)
     
  8. RCReecer

    RCReecer Member

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    I wonder why criminals don't have dogs... I know that NO ONE can approach my house without being 'caught' by one of my two pups.

    No-knock warrants scare me. If someone breaks down my door there is a good chance that they will get shot. It won't be until after I'm dead that they'll realize they got the wrong house. It can and has happened.

    As for the wounded deputy, I hope he's on the way to a speedy recovery.
     
  9. Highland Ranger

    Highland Ranger Member

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    Question on no-knock warrants: do they identify themselves as Police?

    Because if they don't and even if they did and it was the middle of the night, they'd be better served knocking at my house . . . . . dangerous to come in uninvited and easy to see how someone could get hurt.
     
  10. hammer4nc

    hammer4nc Member

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    Link: http://www.journaltimes.com/articles/2003/12/13/local/iq_2593776.txt

    Deputy wounded in shooting at house
    By Jeff Wilford

    RACINE - Racine County Sheriff's Department deputies timed the execution of the search warrant to give them the smallest chance of something going wrong. By going into the upstairs apartment at 1703 Erie St. before 6 a.m., the streets were relatively clear of traffic and pedestrians. And there was less of a chance the people inside the apartment would be awake or ready for them.

    Still, something went wrong.

    As the SWAT team crashed through the door and yelled their intentions, someone inside the apartment opened fire. Deputy David Wawrzyniakowski, the first one through the door, was shot in the left foot.

    At least four shots were fired at the SWAT team, Sheriff Robert Carlson said.

    Wawrzyniakowski, 36, was injured, although the wound was not life-threatening. He was treated at St. Mary's Medical Center and released.

    There were three people inside the apartment - two men and a woman. Only one, Larry Ryan Dunkerly, 22, was arrested. He is being held in the Racine County Jail on a charge of first-degree reckless causing injury and a $50,000 bond. He is also being held on two charges, possession of THC and disorderly conduct, issued by the Racine Police Department.

    The SWAT team went into the apartment so that investigators from the Sheriff's Department Metro Drug Unit could look for drugs, paraphernalia and weapons inside, said Lt. John Gordon, commander of the SWAT team. The warrant was part of an ongoing drug investigation.

    It was a no-knock search warrant, meaning officers announced themselves only as they forced their way inside. No-knock search warrants are used when investigators believe there's a higher chance people inside could destroy evidence or arm themselves if they knew a search was coming.

    Twelve deputies on the SWAT team arrived at the apartment, Gordon said. Three took up positions around the building, to make sure nobody tried to escape through a window. The other nine went up the stairs, to force their way inside and secure the apartment before drug investigators started their search.

    The SWAT team headed up the stairs around 5:50 a.m.

    They broke open the door with a battering ram, yelling "Sheriff's Department! Search warrant!"

    Wawrzyniakowski was first inside the apartment, and was immediately shot in the foot.

    Somebody on the SWAT team shot back, but didn't hit anybody, Gordon said.

    After Wawrzyniakowski was shot, the SWAT team retreated back outside the apartment, pulling Wawrzyniakowski with them, then passing him down the stairs, outside, Gordon said.

    "At that point, the subjects inside realized it was law enforcement, and they immediately surrendered," Carlson said.

    The possibility that whoever fired the gun did so not fully realizing he was shooting at law officers was echoed by one of the man's neighbors.

    The neighbor, who didn't want his name used, said the person in the apartment shot the deputy because he thought he was being robbed. He had been robbed a few days before, the neighbor said.

    "Well, that's always a concern," Gordon said. "That they think they're getting ripped off."

    It still hadn't been determined exactly how many shots were fired at deputies, or where the other bullets struck. The Racine Police Department is handling that investigation.

    Wawrzyniakowski has been with the Racine County Sheriff's Department for seven years, Carlson said. He has been on the SWAT team the last three years.

    Gordon said that, although the very reason for a no-knock warrant means it is more dangerous than usual, it has been years since anyone has shot at the SWAT team. It was the first time he knows of that someone from the SWAT team had actually been shot.

    "We do these kinds of warrants routinely," Gordon said. "We're always prepared for this to happen, but it's never happened before. That's why we train for that stuff."
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sounds like a legit home defense shooting...no-knock warrants carry inherent risks, but the leo's knew that ahead of time, and proceeded anyway. The homeowners surrendered immediately, when they discovered they weren't being robbed, so there was no malicious intent. And thankfully, SWAT's aim wasn't that good. Unfortunate situation...on to the next case.
     
  11. P95Carry

    P95Carry Moderator Emeritus

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    Thing that concerns me a lot on ''no knocks'' is simply that anyone .... I mean anyone can try that trick .... batter down your door and shout out ''armed police'' etc ....... but hell ...... is there any time to ask for and be shown I/D ?? hell no!!

    So what happens ... home is under attack .... not much time to choose options .... so you defend .. natural thing to do. But look at the potential consequences.... and ramifications.
     
  12. manwithoutahome

    manwithoutahome member

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    No knocks are scary. These folks may, or may not, have been guilty as we all have read about "opps, we got the wrong house". I think some old time round the clock police stake-outs would be appropriate to make sure of some type of criminal activity. Heck, in some places, you get ticked off at your neighbor, just call the cops and say you think they are drug dealers. End of neighbor, end of problem.

    I know one thing, if I were a drug dealer or criminal, with all the "money" that I would be making, I would spend the money and put up steel doors, bullet proof windows and reinforce it all so it would take them some time to get into the house. By then, I would have all the time that I needed to get rid of the stuff that was illegal.

    But, I'm not either so I don't have the money to do so but if this becomes the norm "whack em and stack em" sorta speak on so many innocents I may just to protect me and mine from "them".

    I know that serving warrents and traffic stops are "high pressure" and "high stress" times for the police and quite frankly, I could not do it (would end up with a heart attack or something). I also know that precautions need to be taken but there has to be a better way to do things that will give the innocents a chance at life and the police a chance to do their jobs.

    M
     
  13. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

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    I am very very sorry that an officer was wounded just for doing his job. Being the point man is always rough.



    Now having said that... :evil:


    I pity the person who has to do all of the paperwork on this case.

    He's gonna wish that Deputy Smith had been wounded instead of Deputy Wawrzyniakowski.
     
  14. TheeBadOne

    TheeBadOne Member

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    Show me one, much less a bunch of incidents where badguys did a dynamic entry simulating a no-knock warrant. You'll find the overwhelming majority of "Home Invasions" start with a knock on the door and then forcing their way inside. Same goes for the 'bogus cop' home invasions.
     
  15. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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  16. TheeBadOne

    TheeBadOne Member

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    Tallpine

    The link you provided (and the news link inside) do not pertain to bad guys pretending to be Cops serving a No Knock Warrant.
     
  17. hammer4nc

    hammer4nc Member

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    Columbus, OH. police investigating fake police home invasion
    Thursday, November 27, 2003
    Link: http://www.thisweeknews.com/thiswee...knews/112703/wst/News/112703-News-343080.html

    HOME INVASION. A house on the 1500 block of Orlando Drive was robbed Tuesday by burglars posing as police officers. The resident was tied up but not injured. After stealing several items, the assailants drove off in the victim's car. (Dec 4, 2003)
    Link: http://www.bayarea.com/mld/mercurynews/news/local/7410998.htm

    Albuquerque: On Nov. 2, at 1002 Walter S.E., three men wearing masks and identifying themselves as Albuquerque police broke through a back door and shot and injured a 15-year-old boy.

    Four days later, a group of men who also posed as Albuquerque police officers forced their way into a home in the 5400 block of Alice northwest.
    Link: http://www.abqtrib.com/archives/news03/120203_news_invade.shtml
     
  18. carpettbaggerr

    carpettbaggerr Member

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    How bout this one?

     
  19. TheeBadOne

    TheeBadOne Member

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    Read the articles, none were forced dynamic entries.
     
  20. hammer4nc

    hammer4nc Member

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    TBO, what point are you trying not to make?

    Albuquerque: On Nov. 2, at 1002 Walter S.E., three men wearing masks and identifying themselves as Albuquerque police broke through a back door and shot and injured a 15-year-old boy.

    How is this not forced? Not dynamic enough? So, if your front door is unlocked, as in the first case, and black tactical squad bursts in after turning the door handle, we should draw some conclusions relative to this thread?

    It really is difficult to follow your logic, but surely I'm not the first person to mention that to you....
     
  21. TheeBadOne

    TheeBadOne Member

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    Source for above please?


    'Albuquerque police Sgt. Gene Campbell said someone at the trailer in the 2800 block of Campbell answered the door Sunday night to a man who asked for Randy Padilla - the owner of the home and the park.

    That's when three male suspects "overcame four people with Tasers," Campbell said.

    "They were cattle-prodding (Padilla) to find out where he keeps the drugs and the money." '


    The above was taken from one of the articles and outlines 2 themes common to Home Invasions (discounting traditional Asian communites).

    1) Suspects knock and get door opened by homeowner, usually asking for a person or to use the phone etc. Once the door is opened they push their way inside.

    2) Home Invasions are most often targeted at homes that are used for drug dealing/storage. Quite a number of robberys aren't even reported because the victims don't feel they can call the Cops and say, "Yeah, I got my dope ripped off".

    Sometimes the suspects hit the wrong "drug house" by mistake, terrorizing innocent people who have no clue about any drugs or drug money.

    TBO
     
  22. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

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    Same article just further down.

    Not that it matters but I can recall there being instances of people impersonating police all of my life.

    Every year or so there's a local report of someone being pulled over by a fake cop. This is nothing new.

    Does it really matter whether it's a rapist pulling over a woman at 2am or three thugs invading a mobile home looking for drugs?

    Proper police officers WILL have ID.

    That's why I have always advised women to not pull over for ANYONE unless they are 100% sure they are the Police. If it's an unmarked car then drive slowly until you find a safe place. Do NOT try to outrun them unless they are trying to force you off the road.

    Do NOT open your door just because someone says they're the police. Ask to see some ID. If they're in masks they usually don't knock. Ask them to turn on some blue lights if you can't see them well enough.

    And for Pete sakes people LEARN what your local LEO Badge & ID looks like.
    If you don't know then just walk up to the next uniformed LEO you meat and ASK. An officer will be glad to point out to you what a real Badge & ID look like once you explain that you want to know for safety sake.



    Once again, people busting in on sleeping people is Gestapo tactics to me.

    If someone knocks down my door at O Dark Thirty, while I am asleep, SOMEONE will pobably get SHOT. Which is why, I feel, that IF law enforcement is going to continue to use these silly and dangerous No Knocks they should do them when people are awake and alert enough to understand simple commands.

    Since LEO seems to have no problem wasting 15-20 hours of taxpayers time & money talking some failed DotCom moron out of suicide, then surrounding the Drug Trailer and waiting until noon when the thugs finally wake up should be no problem.

    :banghead:
     
  23. 7.62FullMetalJacket

    7.62FullMetalJacket Member

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    "The possibility that whoever fired the gun did so not fully realizing he was shooting at law officers was echoed by one of the man's neighbors.

    The neighbor, who didn't want his name used, said the person in the apartment shot the deputy because he thought he was being robbed. He had been robbed a few days before, the neighbor said.

    "Well, that's always a concern," Gordon said. "That they think they're getting ripped off.""
    :scrutiny:

    There has to be a better way.
     
  24. TheeBadOne

    TheeBadOne Member

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    Solid advice.
     
  25. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    Never said they did ...



    "Three or four masked men with guns broke into a Columbia Heights home Tuesday night..."

    So how do you tell whether they are bad guys pretending to be cops, or cops pretending to be bad guys? :neener:

    Or does it even make any difference? :(
     
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