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rack an pinion recoil system.. anyone done this?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by jason41987, Jul 28, 2012.

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  1. jason41987

    jason41987 member

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    hey.. i was just working on some rifle designs of mine.. and i got the idea for a rack and pinion recoil system, of which the pinion uses a torsion spring, and the rack is machined into the bolt carrier.. when the bolt carrier moves rearward it spins the spur/pinion gear tensioning the spring, then, when its rearward, the spring forces the rack to spin, throwing the carrier forward...

    ive never seen this in small arms, but perhaps a larger piece of atillery, or a prototype somewhere used a similar setup?...

    benefit would be a very, very compact recoil system, which could also allow the magazine of a bullpup design to be nearly full rearward

    obviously, it would cost more, and consist of more parts.. but its more of a "is it even viable" kind of moments
     
  2. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    I don't see how it would work with a torsion spring, unless you used a lot of gears, which would greatly complicate the machine and make tolerances and lubrication requirements a nightmare. A clockspring would work better, but I just don't think it could provide the kind of resistance and speed of tension release you need.

    Possible? Sure. Pratical? Really don't think so. Typical compression-type coil springs are used almost exclusively in firearms for a reason.
     
  3. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    The last thing you want in a shock absorbing system is a pure spring. That's why the howitzers and other artillery pieces use shock absorbing cylinders where they are charged with pressure to include a gas based "spring".

    If you want a better rifle recoil absorber then you want to be considering a unit that looks more like a gas pressure piston cylinder such as used for holding up car tailgates. But with a metered set of valves to control the oil movement.
     
  4. Ian

    Ian Member

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    That's pretty much how a Lewis gun works, although it has a flat wound-up clock spring instead of a torsion spring.
     
  5. briansmithwins

    briansmithwins Member

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    Yep, I was thinking Lewis gun also.

    OTOH, coil springs are cheap to make and very robust. Which would be why almost all self loading firearms use them.

    BSW
     
  6. adelbridge

    adelbridge Member

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    The dwell would be slow and an engineering nightmare to time full auto.
     
  7. Bushpilot

    Bushpilot Member

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    Sounds unnecessarily complicated and heavy. Doesn't actually address any real need or problem.
     
  8. jason41987

    jason41987 member

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    hah... looked up schematics on the lewis gun and there it is... see, i figured someone had done it before, and i already mentioned the reasons coil springs are better, was just curious if someone actually used this setup before... i figured someone had tried it at some point
     
  9. treg

    treg Member

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    Sounds like a project for Jim March, the FrankenBrowning BLR! :eek: :D
     
  10. briansmithwins

    briansmithwins Member

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    Look up Col. G. Chin's 'The Machine Gun'. He has written a exhaustive history of the development of automatic firearms, both rifle caliber and auto-cannon.

    You can find .pdf of the 5 volume set free.

    BSW
     
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