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Recomendations for a Spotting Scope?

Discussion in 'Long Gun Accessories and Optics' started by TAC, Nov 28, 2016.

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  1. TAC

    TAC Member

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    I want to buy my son a good quality Spotting Scope, for use at the range. Something that would be good for viewing paper targets at 100 yards, shot with 5.56mm/.223.

    I'm open to suggestions. Thanks!
     
  2. KansasSasquatch

    KansasSasquatch Member

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    I have a Bushnell 20x-60x that was bought new about 5-6 years ago. I have no trouble seeing .223 holes and calling them within 1/4 inch at 100yards on 30x-40x. At 60x zoom 100 yards is too close for me. I don't imagine Bushnell's quality has gone down in that time. I believe this is the same model that I own http://www.opticsplanet.com/bushnell-20-60x65-trophyxlt-porro-prism-spotting-scope-and-tripod.html
    The small tripod is perfect for setting it up on a sturdy shooting bench or setting it up on the ground if shooting from prone. The hard case is nice for storage and transport and the soft case is useful if you want to put it in a hunting pack. Mine has been in all weather conditions from 15*F with snow, 75*F and light rain, to 95*F and 90% humidity. It has yet to fog up on me.

    You can definitely find less expensive spotting scopes that have the same magnification but the clarity and ability to withstand weather would be my concerns for cheaper spotting scopes. If he'll only use it it nice weather then a less expensive model may be a good option. If your budget could be higher than the model that I linked to, someone else's suggestion may be more helpful as I don't tend to have the fanciest gadgets. I'm a blue collared father with 2 kids and my toys tend to be good enough to get the job done, but rarely more than that.
     
  3. TAC

    TAC Member

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    That looks like all he would need. Thanks for the info. I almost spent $600 on one, that was probably more than I needed.
     
  4. Laphroaig

    Laphroaig Member

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    I've had one of a similar Bushnell for about 30 years. Its very handy to throw the pack containing the scope and tripod into the car when making a range trip. Works fine at 100 yds, and also at 200 with shoot-n-see targets. If I recall mine only has a 60 mm objective, slightly smaller than the new ones. But as KS indicated, the higher powers cut out too much light and are not that useful for spotting bullet holes unless it is really bright. There is a relationship between objective size and optimum light gathering abilities. 60x is too much for a 60, and probably a 65 mm objective as well.

    While checking out the optic planet link, I scrolled through some of the other models, and noticed a 20-60x, 100 mm Konus for the same price. The downfall, other than its probably bigger, is that it doesn't come with a tripod. I know a bunch of people that have Konus spotters, and they all seen to like them for what they are, a mid-priced optic. If it were me, I'd go for the larger objective so you can zoom to higher powers effectively,
     
  5. TAC

    TAC Member

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    Bartojc likes this.
  6. Ks5shooter
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    Ks5shooter Contributing Member

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  7. Sebastian the Ibis
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    Sebastian the Ibis Member

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    Check out your local bird watching group. Bird watchers usually have the best optics (binos and scopes). A bird watcher who traded up to a better scope will likely give you an amazing deal on his old scope.

    Also, I highly recommend the 45 degree eye piece. If you ever have two people of different heights taking turns looking through the scope, it is a game changer. If the eye piece is straight, you have to re-adjust the height, instead of just bending over. Also, you can't look at the moon/stars unless you lie awkwardly on the ground.

    Finally, if you are generally shooting from a bench at a range, consider duct-taping (or otherwise) attaching a C-clamp to the leg of a cheap tri-pod. This way you can clamp the scope to the end of the shooting bench and save space on the benchtop. I have seen more than a few scopes take a tumble, when the tripod leg gets caught up in sling or the shooter is not paying attention.
     
  8. Bart B.

    Bart B. Member

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    A good choice is a Celestron 80 Ultima:

    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/celestr...ffcode=pg147385&ksdevice=c&lsft=ref:212,loc:2

    When set to 20 to 25 power, 22 caliber bullet holes can be seen in the black at 200 to 300 yards. Like all zoom spotting scopes, image sharpness is best at lowest powers.

    An adapter is available to mount a digital SLR (Canon or Nikon) for "digiscoping" wildlife or whatever at long range. I've got one and my DSLR images are pretty good. Have to use a very sturdy tripod, though.
     
  9. goldpelican

    goldpelican Member

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    Currently looking at an Ultima 100 - anyone got one?
     
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