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Recommend Corded Screwdriver for Reloading

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by capreppy, Dec 3, 2012.

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  1. capreppy

    capreppy Member

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    Looking for recommendations for a CORDED (hate rechargeables as they never last long) screwdriver. Primary purpose is for
    flash hole deburring
    primer pocket uniforming

    These are obviously one time case prep activities, but when doing hundreds (thousands), my wrist hurts.
     
  2. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    Powered screwdrivers don't have a chuck. You need a drill, not a screwdriver.

    Key features I like:
    1. light weight ; you don't need a lot of torque to process brass
    2. one-handed keyless chuck ; this means the drill doesn't spin freely when off. You twist the chuck with one hand to tighten or loosen it. A two-piece keyless chuck means you need to use both hands.
    3. Variable speed is nice. Even better for this is a cheapy drill that has 2 set speeds, low and high. I find that a set speed helps with consistency.

    Optionally, an adjustable torque limiter is useful if you use a Zip Trim chuck with drill adapter. You can really zip the cases in quick without tearing up your skin by setting the torque low enough.

    Beyond that, you really don't need a quality tool to do this stuff. Not a lot of torque, and you don't need a precision, low run-out spindle.
     
  3. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I use a Black and Decker battery screwdriver that uses standard AA batteries for trimming with the Lee trimmer. I drilled and tapped the 1/4" hex socket to hold the Lee case stud in the driver.

    Works great.

    I also made an adapter that I can screw in primer pocket brushes.

    No chuck required and I find a drill motor much to cumbersome.

    I know the OP is looking for a corded screwdriver and i cannot say i have eve seen one. Does not mean they are not out there.

    I have used rechargeable batteries with the B&D screw driver but also standard AA batteries. Life of the batteries is pretty good.

    Another option with the B&D screwdriver, get a nominal 6v wall wart charger and adapt it to the screwdriver. My screwdriver uses a removable battery holder. A spare holder could be adapted leaving the option to run off batteries.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. capreppy

    capreppy Member

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    Thanks Chuck. I did have a B&D that I used early on for trim duty when I first started reloading and all I had was a Lee trimmer.

    Most flash hole deburrers (I have the RCBS with colletts for all of the calibers I need) and primer pocket uniformers (still looking to make this purchase) have a similar threading. I can't remember off hand what that threading is though. I thought I saw one of major biggies created an adapter for this particular threading to a standard chuck size. I think the B&D handles this chuck size.

    Thoughts?
     
  5. capreppy

    capreppy Member

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    I have thought about spending a little more and getting a Hornady case prep station. The one with one attachment, but the one with three might work better if I could attach the flash hold deburrer and the primer pocket uniformer at the same time.
     
  6. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    Sinclair International makes a number of different adapters for driving from a quarter inch hex socket. I do not remember exactly what they have.

    I have a chuck that is driven from a 1/4" hex drive. I find it makes the screw driver too long for case prep stuff. But, I think it is one that uses the quick disconnect feature on many powered screw drivers. The chuck could be modified to be shorter. But, the chuck is not very big.

    The Hornady case prep unit is nice. Definitely more convenient than switching tools on a powdered screw driver. I do not process enough cases these days to justify one at this time.
     
  7. capreppy

    capreppy Member

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    I've been buying stuff in partnership with a local reloading buddy. We've gone halfsies on a Giraud Trimmer and an RCBS Chargemaster. We don't process enough brass to warrant a Giraud, but between the two of us, we were able to split the cost (helped that we found one used). Same with the Chargemaster.

    At $96 for the Hornady prep trio, I might just ask for one for Christmas :D

    You bring up a good point about having to switch out the parts. And as I think about it, I would save significant time if I could flash hold debur and uniform primer pocket while holding the piece of brass the ONE time and then be done with it.
     
  8. CZ57

    CZ57 member

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    capreppy, I use a Ryobi Drill/Driver I bought at Home Depot. I didn't buy it for reloading but the first time I used it for primer pocket cleaning I realized I could use the two spirit levels it has to make sure I am holding it straight and square to the primer pocket. ;)
     
  9. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    http://www.amazon.com/Black-Decker-...28&sr=8-3&keywords=black+and+decker+vpx+drill

    This drill looks kinda cheesy, but it's my most-used out of 4 drills, because it's very light and pretty short for having a chuck. I use it on the high setting for most of my case prep work. I bought a spare when I found out they were being discontinued. I got both of mine at $30.00. I use salvaged li ion cells from old laptop batteries. I've got enough to keep the thing going for decades.

    Besides only taking a hex bit, screwdrivers are high torque and low speed. And unless you get a high end one, the bit often tends to wobble or even come out by itself.

    If I were going to get spendy, I'd get something like this:
    http://www.amazon.com/Hitachi-DS10D...&qid=1354595895&sr=1-11&keywords=li+ion+drill

    I had the exact same feelings as you, on battery powered drills. But then li ion happened. Li ion batteries are not the NiCads of old. They're quite incredible. They hold a charge for a long, long time, and they don't self-discharge. So if you charged it a year ago, pick it up and it's good to go. Just plug it in AFTER you're done, and they won't be damaged by leaving the battery in the charger 24/7. The only minor annoyance with lithium battery drills is you have to take care to not leave 'em in a car or outside in the summer sun. But if you take care of the battery - for li ion, that means don't leave it completely discharged or in the heat - it'll last and last. So, yeah, li ion drills seem ridiculously expensive. But they're actually much cheaper over the long run and more useful than the NiCd crapola of the old days. My only corded hand drill anymore is a ~7 lb hammer drill. I bought it for drilling safe anchors in concrete, but these days it finds use mostly as a lathe, cuz it's so heavy and it has zero runout.

    In fact, if you don't already have a good cordless drill, my gosh, that's a way more useful tool for the average reloader than a fully decked out case prep center.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  10. Etkini

    Etkini Member

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    If I did clean primer pockets or debur, I'd probably get one of the Hornady Trio units. Assuming you were buying the flash-hole deburring tool, pocket uniformer, and the screwdriver adapter for the pocket uniformer, you'd be at $60. A little silly when the Hornady unit can be had for $20 more, and is self-powered - then just add the accessories you want since you can change them out.

    For my case trimming\chamfering, I use a Dewalt 18v XRP drill I bought 4 years ago when I was a cable tech. The battery lasts me an incredibly long time; I've never timed it but I used to make it through an entire 14 hour day of drilling\screwing heavily on one battery. It's completely overkill, and if you were to drop $300 on something your money could be and would be better spent elsewhere.
     
  11. capreppy

    capreppy Member

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    I trim / chamfer / debur on a Giraud so won't need those tools.

    I'm only looking to speed up flash hold deburring and primer pocket uniforming.

    Definitely would prefer the cheaper route. I may stick with the little B&D decker cordless I have now. They make AA lithium ion batteries and I may invest in some. I tried the NiCad AA rechargeables and they didn't last long before they needed to be switched out and that was a pain.
     
  12. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    Go on one of the many sites that has used stuff or a yard/rummage sale and buy a used battery drill that has a dead battery and then find a used DC wall wart that will work with it as mentioned above. You may already have one that will work as it only has to be close in voltage. Wire it up inside to work. You should be able to get a used drill for a few dollars with shipping included on line as they are not expensive after they get a dead battery. I made one of these to use in the car with a long wire and clips for hooking to the battery when at the range for just such a use years ago.:)
     
  13. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    Cable drive multi speed dremil tool.
     
  14. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    The rechargeable high output kind put out 3.6V each, rather than 1.5V. So you would need to modify your drill to put some of the batteries in parallel, rather than series. And you would also need to buy a proper charger for it, if you don't know much about electronics. The Energizer "lithium" AA batteries are not li ion, at all. Just a variation of alkaline chemistry designed to work better with the relatively high drain of digital cameras/flashes and not rechargeable.

    Most lithium ion cells need to be charged to exactly 4.2V, each (depending on chemistry, some take only as much as 3.6V). Expose to any higher voltage than that, and they'll die. So a li ion charger must be both voltage and current limited. So don't try charging li ion batteries with a walwart or a NiCd charger.

    So unless you commonly use a soldering iron and are familiar with electronics, you might be better off spending on a new li ion drill. They're da bomb and worth every penny. And oh, forget my previous recommendation. I'd go with a Bosch PS31. For 25.00 more, you lose some voltage, but you get a lighter drill with a one-piece keyless chuck and auto-brake, and it's hard to describe how much more awesome that is than a two-piece keyless chuck.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  15. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    Or if the standard AA batteries are in series, just put a jumper in place of every other battery, depending on the design of the battery holder.
     
  16. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    Yeah, but then you are only using half as many batteries as could fit. That might still give enough capacity, but it would be a crying shame. :)

    Funny, I'm a huge fan of Lee, cuz it's cheap and gets the job done. But my power tools are half Bosch. My jigsaw cost more than a new Rockchucker. And my corded hammer drill with zero runout - also Bosch (I bought this one after trying to get by with a HF cheapo... that burned out before getting an inch into the concrete). I'm thinking of getting a PS130 for a do-it-all drill so I can put the 7lb beast into storage. I'm expecting it to have very good precision (namely, low runout - one thing my B&D drills don't have), like all my other Bosch tools. I'm not a brand whore, but for the Bosch tools I have purchased, the user ratings were thru the roof, and they had key features I really wanted; I've yet to be disappointed.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  17. blarby

    blarby Member

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    A #3 bit works just fine , even in longer sessions.

    Sorry, OP- I don't know of any powered , corded, screwdrivers !

    a decently sized handle on any standard #3 will make short work out of 50 cases at a time, FWIW.
     
  18. capreppy

    capreppy Member

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    I'm willing to admit I have zero capabilities to deal with electronics.

    With that being said, I may just ask for an RCBS Trim Mate Case Prep Center. All I'm really going to use this for is flash hole deburring and primer pocket uniforming.
     
  19. dgod

    dgod Member

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    I would recommend a Swagger, it is like a Die, in that it fits the press, but it opens the Boxed primer pockets up, and you only have to do it once.

    I got one at the suggestion of a friend, it work like a dream on Boxed Primers.
     
  20. dgod

    dgod Member

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    I have one of the drills referred to here, it is a GREAT tool, I highly recommend
     
  21. splattergun

    splattergun Member

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    Same thing my dentist uses, 3/8 B&D drill. :neener:
     
  22. NeuseRvrRat

    NeuseRvrRat Member

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    i would highly suggest you check out craigslist or whatever other local classifieds you have and find a benchtop drill press. if i remember correctly, i got mine for about $50. i use a possum hollow trimmer with adapter to trim. the same adapter allows me to chamfer and deburr. if you ream primer pockets, you can do that with it as well. a small drill press is a handy thing to have.
     
  23. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    FTR, I purchased that Bosch PS130 on a whim. My other Bosch tools were manufactured in Switzerland. This one in Malaysia. But so far so good. It spins a 1 foot aluminum rod smooth as silk. It doesn't appear to have the horsepower of the same class Makita, but it sure looks like I have that 2.3 lb cordless hand lathe I was hoping for.

    After a little research, it appears most all the "affordable" cordless drills, these days, are manufactured in China. Skill, Makita, Dewalt, Porter Cable, et al. But they're not all the same. My Ryobi and B&D's have crazy runout.

    I'm surprised that more handloaders aren't tool nuts. I thought we were most all tinkerers. The mere thought of using a 250 rpm cordless screwdriver running on AA batteries, or even a tinker toy 250 rpm case prep carousel, when you have the perfect opportunity to play with a lot more and sexy horsepower at 1000+ rpm makes me sad. The idea of owning a Giraud, yet NOT having access to a decent cordless drill is unthinkable! (To be more accurate, not having access to a decent cordless drill is unthinkable without any other qualifiers!)

    I've said it before: If I had to give up all my guns or all my power tools, I'd give up the guns. That would give me a new project - to make a firearm from scratch.:)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2012
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