Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Recommendations for young, wannabe police officer

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by JackBurtonJr, Sep 19, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. JackBurtonJr

    JackBurtonJr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    282
    I know a young man who wants to be a police officer. He's the kind of guy we need to encourage -- bright, affable, with a real servant's heart.

    However, he's never, ever shot a handgun before. I'm taking him to the range this morning to at least get him acquainted with the basics.

    Any thoughts on books/videos about shooting that would be appropriate (and actually worthwhile) for him to acquire while he is in the process of applying for the position.

    Certainly I will be sending him to Col. Cooper but any other thoughts will be helpful.
     
  2. Borch

    Borch Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    Messages:
    195
    Pretty much anything by Massad Ayoob. Although some of the stuff he has written is intended for a more advanced shooter he has written a bunch of books for beginners, not to mention about a billion articles in different gun rags and cop magazines.

    One more thing, I'm sure you probably know this but, start him off with a simple, tame weapon. The first handgun I shot my uncle put a 1911 .45 in my hand and said, "Fire away." Needless to say that at 12 years old I was a little timid about handguns for a while after that. I'm sure he's older than 12 but handguns are intimidating for new shooters of any age. Especially big ones.
     
  3. IndianaBoy

    IndianaBoy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,155
    Start him on a 22. Make it fun for him and he will do well.
     
  4. JackBurtonJr

    JackBurtonJr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    282
    That's what my Ruger 22/45 is for. :)
     
  5. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    4,755
    Location:
    Utah
    Also start him close enough.

    As far as books go, A Nation of Cowards by Jeff Snyder is a good read.
     
  6. scrat

    scrat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2007
    Messages:
    6,882
    Location:
    Monrovia, CA
    focus on safety first. show him how to unload it safely and all proper uses.
     
  7. Eric F

    Eric F Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    2,934
    have him look up geko45 and read everything as an example oh how not to act!
     
  8. James T Thomas

    James T Thomas Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1,185
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    books and guns and experience

    I don't know of any better book to recommend to you for him than the Bible.

    It's full of human pathos, and truths about life as it is; as right and wrong, good judgement, and integrity.

    After all that, it speaks to the "servant's heart," so much.
    Try to counsel your young man that he doesn't become jaded because most of humanity he will deal with will be not helpable, that is irredeemable.

    I recommend starting him off with the double action revolver.
    No other handgun will give him the mastery of sight picture -trigger control connection as does the double action revolver. And he will not be tempted to get into the "fire power" reflex with it either.
     
  9. Mannlicher

    Mannlicher Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,431
    Location:
    North Central Florida and Miami Florida
    I hope he realizes, that rightly or wrongly, a lot of folks just don't like the police. Many citizens don't trust them, or want to be around them.
    He needs to know that he will get negative vibes from a number of folks he runs up against.
    It is almost never anything personal, but the result of some traffic stop or other 'interface' that left a bad taste in the Citizens mouth.
     
  10. CountGlockula

    CountGlockula Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Messages:
    3,522
    Location:
    In a Los Angeles coffin.
  11. Old Grump

    Old Grump Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    410
    Location:
    Blue River Wisconsin
    +1 on single action 22 revolver and bulls eye targets set up at 50' or 25 yards. Just want to teach him the basics in safety, sight and trigger control and basics of marksmanship. Ayoob and Cooper are good reading but the academy is going to have their own procedures in place and a new shooter sometimes has an easier time learning from scratch than if he has already been trained in a different system. Marksmanship training at simple bullseye targets and plinking at reactive targets like water filled jugs and tin cans is a plus because good marksmanship is a positive no matter what combat system style he is going to learn.
     
  12. Henry Bowman

    Henry Bowman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    6,717
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Give him a copy of Unintended Consequences by John Ross. Seriously.
     
  13. JackBurtonJr

    JackBurtonJr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    282
    Well, we had a good day at the range. I started him off with the Four Rules and had him memorize them before we did anything else. We spent the first 30 minutes on that alone.

    I had him shooting at five inch pie plates at 25 feet with my Ruger .22 to start. He could pretty much keep most of them in the circle.

    When we moved to 25 yards he had a much tougher time with grouping.

    I tried to keep everything at the really basic level, with understanding that his real training would come from the Academy. He really enjoyed what I was able to show him and is very interested in going back again.

    But it offended my sense of propriety that someone could be going off to be a policeman without ever having picked up a gun in his life.:)

    He's in my daughter's college and careers class at church so I don't think he'll be one of the ones to go off and come back a stormtrooper. We had about as much talk on that as we did anything else. He's opposed to the current trend of militarizing the police, and wants to be a "peace officer."

    I wish him the best of fortune.
     
  14. Old Grump

    Old Grump Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    410
    Location:
    Blue River Wisconsin
    Good job and more power to the young one.
     
  15. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Messages:
    4,755
    Location:
    Utah
    Jack,
    Hat's off to you sir. With a respectful bow.
     
  16. DMF

    DMF Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,247
    Location:
    Nomad
    Why would you recommend a book filled with lies, and anti-LE nonsense for a kid wanting to be a cop. :rolleyes:
     
  17. DMF

    DMF Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    2,247
    Location:
    Nomad
    1st, I'd say don't teach him about firearms. It's very possible you will teach him something that might conflict with the training he will recieve at the academy. That's not to say that you would be teaching him anything "wrong", but that it just might conflict with the particular training program he will doing at the academy. That might actually hinder his performance due him having to "unlearn" some things while trying to also learn the techniques as taught at the Academy.

    As for reading I'd suggest, "Into the Kill Zone: A Cop's Eye View of Deadly Force." It's written by a former LAPD officer who was forced to kill someone while a rookie, then went on get a PhD in Sociology, and did research on deadly force encounters.
     
  18. JackBurtonJr

    JackBurtonJr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Messages:
    282
    "1st, I'd say don't teach him about firearms. It's very possible you will teach him something that might conflict with the training he will recieve at the academy. That's not to say that you would be teaching him anything "wrong", but that it just might conflict with the particular training program he will doing at the academy. That might actually hinder his performance due him having to "unlearn" some things while trying to also learn the techniques as taught at the Academy."

    If a person can't easily "unlearn" an hours worth of informal instruction out on the range then they probably shouldn't be a cop.
     
  19. Scoutsout2645

    Scoutsout2645 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    95
    Location:
    NJ...How you doin'?
    Teach him the basics--sight picture, breathing, safety, trigger control, etc. DON'T worry about the more "high speed" stuff like drawing from the holster, shooting while moving, double taps and so on until he gets out of the academy. His firearms instructors are going to have a specific set of techniques that they will teach him and that he will need to learn--a task that is easier to accomplish from a "clean slate". Teach him to walk and that will let others teach him to run.

    As far as what weapon to start with...my first handgun was a 1911 at the age of 18. If he's old enough to take on a man's job, he's old enough to use a man's tools. .22s may be easy to shoot, but look at what the local departments use and get him used to that round (9mm and .40 are pretty much the industry standard, although I know a few Departments up my way that use .45s). Same with equipment...I don't want to turn this into a revolver vs. semi-auto debate, but the reality is that virtually every LE agency out there uses semi-autos and that is what he should train on. Teach him how a revolver functions and how to make one safe (crucial general weapons knowledge that all LEOs should have), but teach him to shoot on a semi-auto.

    Nothing personal, but nothing irritates me more than quotes like this for two very different but equally important reasons (and I'll temper my response since you did throw the smiley on there).
    1) I joined the Army at 18 having never shot anything but my Grandpa's pellet gun. Qualified expert with the 1911 and M16 and was surgical with my M203. I also saw guys "raised with guns" who couldn't hit 100yd targets, let alone the 300s. Prior experience may help but it is not a valid indicator of performance.

    2) I have been a LEO for almost 14 yrs, and have known 100s of years' worth of LEO experience from guys in rural to the most urban departments in my state. I have never had to shoot anyone and the majority of LEOs out there will finish their careers never using their weapon off the range. The Hollywood/TV mythology that cops do nothing but shoot people is possibly one of the most damaging to the profession. Showing that attitude to an impressionable future LEO may very well get him in the mindset of pulling, or using, that weapon prematurely. There IS a violent, physical component to what we do but your future LEO is far more likely to get into a hand-to-hand brawl with an unarmed person than into a gunfight--has he ever been punched (REALLY punched) in the face? Does he know how to wrestle or grapple? Does he know what it's like to get the wind knocked out of him or get hit from behind and still have to fight off an attacker? THESE are the lifesaving skills that he should learn before getting on the job long before he needs to worry about shooting.

    Enough ranting...thank you for trying to teach a young man a valuable skill and taking an interest in helping him in his career.

    Best of luck in his ambition. Be safe.
     
  20. Aguila Blanca

    Aguila Blanca Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,693
    I thought you wanted to help the kid.

    Then you want to off him? Sheesh ...
     
  21. stevelyn

    stevelyn Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2003
    Messages:
    3,290
    Location:
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    As an example of how not to act.

    I didn't find it to be anti LEO at all unless you regard the sturmtruppen thug bastards of the Waffen BATFEces LE. I don't. I think they are an embarrassment to cops and I don't think of them as one of us.
    It's like calling the SS a public safety department.

    I wouldn't get in too deep with teaching him about shooting.

    Like the military, the academy has a specific firearms doctrine that they teach. The less bad habits, misconceptions or pratices they show up with the easier they are to teach and make it through the first time.
     
  22. Sixtigers

    Sixtigers Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2007
    Messages:
    178
    Location:
    Ridgecrest, California
    Actually, familiarizing this promising young man with firearms may be incredibly harmful to his chances of becoming a police officer.

    I cannot stress this enough. For my two cents, I wouldn't do it.

    Familiarization with firearms can do tremendous damage during pre-entry psychological evaluations. It would be in the young man's best interest to let his weapons training come from academy sources.

    YMMV. With all respect intended.
     
  23. Kind of Blued

    Kind of Blued Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    3,676
    Location:
    Rocky Mountains
    We have some worriers!

    Teaching the guy how sights work, not to jerk a trigger, not to point a gun at anything he doesn't want to destroy, and keeping his finger off of the trigger until ready to shoot is not going to "come back and haunt him" when he gets into a dept.

    A co-worker of mine who is in the academy brought in his XD the other day to show it to us and muzzle*&^#%$ every one of us.

    If nothing else, this fellow the OP is helping can now go into the Academy having shot a gun before. Even if he forgets everything, at least he won't be as nervous.
     
  24. Scoutsout2645

    Scoutsout2645 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    95
    Location:
    NJ...How you doin'?
    Sixtigers:
    What??! I'm from NJ and that strikes me as some of the worst anti- propaganda I've heard in years. I know LOTS of guys who are on the job that were "familiar" with guns beforehand (myself included) that had NO problems with the psych. Relax.
     
  25. deaconkharma

    deaconkharma Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2008
    Messages:
    246
    Location:
    Columbia SC
    Tell hime to read this board....

    He can look at what both sides say and the arguments presented from both. Let him decide what to think. There is enough back and forth between the thin blue line and the two black lines here for him to make a judgement. Hopefully he can split the hair between personal safety and respect for others' liberties.;)


    Darn can't edit my poor spelling... Tell HIM to read this board. (not HIME
    -darn hooked on phonics!)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page