Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Redding die set for .30 Carbine

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by jski, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. jski

    jski Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2016
    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    Florida
    I decided to add an extra .30 Carbine die set to my bench. That's after my RCBS re-sizing broke, the pin snapped for some reason unbeknownst to me.

    It appears that only Lee and RCBS offer carbide re-sizing dies for the .30 Carbine. So I thought about a Redding die set. But I'm leary steel v. carbide re-sizing dies. Having to lube each and every case sounds painful.

    Is there ANY reason to prefer steel to carbide?

    Is there any method less problematic that lube pads?

    Is it true that if you fail to lube a case, it can easily get lodged in the die, almost impossible to extract?
     
  2. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    7,491
    Location:
    East TN
    Generally, the die manufacturers that make 30 Carbine carbide dies recommend using lubricant anyway with the carbide dies. The 30 Carbine case is tapered and it resizes better. I supposed the reason is that the carbide ring is only at the bottom of the die and the upper part of the case is still sized by steel.

    Many folks reloading 30 Carbine that use carbide dies do so without using lubricant.

    I have steel dies for resizing 30 Carbine. They work just fine but lubricant is an absolute must. I've used RCBS Case Lube II and more recently, lanolin/alcohol mix. With the latter, you need to let the alcohol flash off before resizing. Dillon spray on case lube is lanolin/alcohol and works well if you do not want to make your own.

    It is best to clean the cases prior to sizing. Various particulate debris like sand will scratch the die which will scratch the cases. If you catch the scratch, it can be polished out with 600 or higher wet/dry sand paper but it is a pain in the butt.

    If you keep the cases clean, the chance of scratching the die is very low.

    Steel dies do require a bit more care in use than carbide dies, but once you get the needs of the dies ingrained in your thought process, they do not take any additional time in use.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Toprudder and WelshShooter like this.
  3. jski

    jski Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2016
    Messages:
    324
    Location:
    Florida
    I did notice this on Dillon's website (for the .30 Carbine):
     
  4. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Messages:
    5,950
    Location:
    Oregon Coast
    RCBS will replace your broken parts. All it takes is a phone call and they'll ship them right out without charge.

    As for carbide .30 Carbine dies, save your money. I've got several .30 Carbine sizing dies, both steel and carbide. The steel dies work just fine, and the carbide do, too, just not enough better than steel to justify the extra cost. You'll never live long enough to need a carbide sizing die in .30 Carbine.........

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
    Tinybob likes this.
  5. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    5,225
    I use a steel Herters sizing die and a RCBS seating die. IIRC the 30 carbine has a slight taper to the case. This is not a condemnation of carbide dies but my combo has worked for over 30 years.

    I use the Lee water soluble lube and don't feel it's a lot more work.
     
  6. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    22,784
    Location:
    Northeast PA, USA
    This is true. IMO there's no reason to buy different dies just because a part broke, especially when the dies you have are of such high quality as RCBS dies.

    Some 30 Carbine primers are crimped. It's possible that's why you broke the decapping pin.
     
    Tinybob likes this.
  7. Maj Dad

    Maj Dad Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,620
    Location:
    Carolina Low Country
     
  8. WelshShooter

    WelshShooter Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2014
    Messages:
    266
    I use a carbide sizer with my .30 carbine but I still lubricate every case. As has been said, it's a tapered case and eases the process, less strain on my loading arm! Makes sizing 300 cases in a sitting a breeze.
     
  9. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    7,491
    Location:
    East TN
    Yes, with steel resizing dies, if you do not lubricate the case, it will get stuck.

    There are stuck case removal kits available. I know RCBS and Redding make them. These will handle the bulk of stuck cases. Dillon dies, as noted have a feature to aid in stuck case removal. Many of the die manufacturers offer a stuck case removal service should the user get a case stuck and then damage the case beyond the level where simple tools can remove the case.

    As a side note, virtually all bottle neck sizing dies used by the home reloader are steel. Dillon makes carbide dies for a couple popular rifle cartridges (223 Rem, 308 Win, etc) but they still require the cases to be lubricated. The carbide rifle dies are very expensive and are made for the volume loader who would wear out a steel sizing die.

    Case lube pads, finger application, and spray application are the three most common methods hand loaders use to lubricate the cases. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. There are permutations of each method that enterprising loaders discover that works well for them.

    There is an optimum range of the amount of lubricant to use. Too much lubricant applied to cases gets messy and can damage cases, too little results in stuck cases.

    I've used all three. I like the spray application of lanolin/alcohol for straight walled cases including 30 Carbine (30 Carbine is straight walled, just not parallel walled). I use the case lube pad predominantly for rifle cases but also use finger applied Imperial Sizing wax at times.
     
  10. hdwhit
    • Contributing Member

    hdwhit Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    Messages:
    3,408
    Location:
    Frisco, TX
    If something broke on an RCBS die, just call (or even email) their customer service. They will take care of you.

    30 carbine carbide dies still need lubricant. I use Hornady Unique. You get a little bit on your fingers, wait a couple of minutes for it to get into the pores, add just a bit more (the amounts are surprisingly small) and then you need do little more than touch the length of the case to have it adequately lubricated. Unique rubs off or tumbles off easily. It's primarily beef tallow so there's no danger having it on your skin.
     
  11. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Messages:
    5,950
    Location:
    Oregon Coast
    Most case lubes contain anhydrous lanolin, which is derived from sheep's wool. Beef tallow would rot in a short time and smell up the reloading room in no time flat.......... The carrier is denatured alcohol, which contains no water.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  12. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Messages:
    49,360
    Location:
    Alabama
    Since lube is recommended for the carbide .30 Carbine sizer, even if some folks don't use it, I imagine they are hard to size compared to some cases. That combined with an old shoulder that likes to lightly lube every 10th or so 9MM case these day, I would strongly consider going the steel sizer/lube route if I started loading for .30 carbine.

    I use RCBS case lube and just put a drop on my pointer finger. Rub it on thumb and "bird" finger. Pick up case, roll it between thumb and fingers on the way to the shell plate. It barely slows me up at all. I have to pause every so many cases to add another drop of lube, but as far as the process of picking up the case and putting it in the shell plate, the time difference is minuscule.
     
  13. Sunray

    Sunray Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    11,479
    Location:
    London, Ont.
    "...the pin snapped..." Assuming that's the decapping pin, they're designed to break. Easily and cheaply replaced. RCBS will send you a package for free. S'why you pay extra for their dies.
    .30 Carbine is loaded just like any straight walled pistol case. Carbide dies are your friend. Haven't used case lube on Carbine brass, ever, in 40 years.
     
  14. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Messages:
    13,148
    Location:
    Happy Valley, UT
    I have the RCBS steel .30 Carbine dies and it is the ONLY time I have used Hornady One Shot as the main sizing lube for a rifle cartridge (after I stuck 3 cases when I was just starting out; now I use Imperial sizing wax for all other rifle). It works fine. I use it for all my handgun brass in carbide dies anyway. But for this straight-walled case in these dies it works fine for me.
     
  15. Hardtarget

    Hardtarget Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2002
    Messages:
    3,103
    Location:
    Nashville, Tn.
    Lube...and use enough of it. .30 carbine cases are a bit thicker so do not under lube...stuck cases are not fun. I've loaded lots but never stuck a carbine case...stuck a .223 once. ( wasn't fun either!)
    I should add, I use RCBS steel dies. They work fine and my loads function as well.

    Mark
     
    Tinybob likes this.
  16. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,125
    Location:
    Colorado
    Like they said, RCBS will replace broken or worn out parts, no questions asked.

    You didn't break that pin on an LC52, did ya? I did that once, on some once fired brass I picked up...and then learned (here probably) that the Chinese had been making some of those, but with berdan primers. Highly corrosive too, apparently
     
  17. Tinybob

    Tinybob Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Messages:
    292
    Location:
    South Arkansas
    LC 44 and some WRA primers are crimped in my experience.

    I use RCBS steel dies for my Inland. I de-cap with a Lee Universal de-priming die and clean in wet tumble with pins before lubing and sizing. This process works good for me.

    Beware of some pulled FMJ. I've had some run .305-.306 dia. Not able to taper crimp well.
     
  18. tcoz

    tcoz Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Messages:
    1,120
    Location:
    South Carolina Lowcountry
    I use Lee carbide dies for 30 carbine but it's still necessary to lube as the cases are not straight walled. The advantage to carbide dies is that they'll last longer but you'll never size enough cases to wear non carbide dies out anyway.
     

Share This Page