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Redhawk or Blackhawk?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by shane justice, Jan 12, 2006.

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  1. jsr5

    jsr5 Member

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    Oh yeah make fun of the new guy (I'm so traumatized Ill never be able to post here again.) ;)

    Naw but firepower is always important. And it's cool when target shooting to just drop in another 6. At any rate I don't think the Redhawk gives anything up to the Black hawk and yes for hunting it's really a matterof how the ergonomics work for you. But don't come running to me when you can't re-load fast enough to handle the Red Hordes coming over the hill at you. :evil:
     
  2. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Please don't take me too serious. :D Most of what I type is with a chuckle, but sometimes it don't come across that way. This site seems pretty laid back with few attitudes, so I haven't gotten jumped on for my lack of tact too much. :D

    Red hordes???? Nah, that's passé. Today's theat is camel mounted assault forces wearing vests made of C4.

    The only advantage of the standard blackhawk I can see over the redhawk is weight. If you're strictly handgun hunting, that's no biggy at all. However, if you're using the gun for back packing in bear country or something, lighter the better. I'd go with either the mountain gun or my blackhawk for that over a heavier super blackhawk or redhawk. Just depends on what you're using it for primarily I reckon.

    Heck, I may in the future hunt with that blackhawk, but so far all my deer hunting, aside from a couple some years ago gunned down by a .357 magnum, is done with a Contender which is no lightweight, but not as heavy as some of those 50 caliber cannons coming out now. I use it for its rifle like accuracy. The accuracy of that thing is intoxicating.
     
  3. Marshall

    Marshall Member

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    You may be interested in the following, I think it is something to consider and attests to the Red Hawks strength as well. I personally know of no other factory load as hot as this for a 44 Magnum.

    Buffalo Bore
    NEW HEAVY 44 MAGNUM +P+

    340 gr. LBT-LFN GC . (1478 fps / M.E. 1649 ft. lbs.)


    This new load is designed for only certain revolvers that have the cylinder length to handle it. They are as follows. Ruger Red Hawk, Taurus Raging Bull and Dan Wesson Revolvers.

    You may have noted that we did not include the Ruger Super Black Hawk or the Freedom Arms model 83 as revolvers that we recommend for the +p+ load. Both of these revolvers are certainly strong enough for this load, but they have cylinders that are short enough to cause concern for this long nosed +p+ load. If you will take care to rotate any unfired rounds when you reload your revolver, you may use our +p+ load in these two revolvers, remembering that your failure to rotate the unfired rounds will result in crimp jump and will eventually tie your revolver up as the bullet nose protrudes beyond the cylinder face and hits the back of your barrel.

    This load brings a level of power to the 44 mag. that has never before been known.

    The below velocities tell the story.

    5.5 inch factory stock Red Hawk--1401 fps
    7.5 inch factory stock Red Hawk--1478 fps
     
  4. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    :eek: Would a mountain gun handle the pressure of this monster, I mean even if it could chamber it???? Jeez, that's near 454 territory! :eek: I think I'd wanna shoot something like that in a Freedom Arms or something SUPER strong like that.
     
  5. Tom C.

    Tom C. Member

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    I have 5 ½” Redhawks in both .44 mag and .45 Colt, and a 5 ½” Super Blackhawk in .44 mag and 5 ½” Blackhawk in .45 Colt. It comes down to a matter of personal preference. The trigger systems are different, but one isn’t better than the other, just different. The grips are very different and the way they handle recoil is very different. The weight is a little different, with the Super Blackhawk being about 3 oz lighter. Which you choose will be based on personal preference.
    If you want to scope them, they both have versions with built in barrel mounts. Makes the decision even more difficult.
    Buy both. If you can’t buy both right away, prioritize based on preference and get the one you prefer first.
     
  6. Any Cal.

    Any Cal. Member

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    Jan 8, 2006
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    I have owned both, and they are both quite good. The blackhawk is faster to hand, slightly lighter, and mine have been easier to shoot well. (7.5") The Redhawk is stronger, and double action. If you are accustomed to firing single action revos, the fastest first shot will come with the Blackhawk. I switched to a Redhawk because I could not run the Blackhawk very fast with gloves on. They tended to ride up on the grip and get caught between grip and hammer, preventing the hammer from coming all the way back. I roundbutted the Redhawk, which made it quicker to hand, but increased perceived recoil.
    If it was summertime facing non dangerous game, Blackhawk. Wintertime or facing something big, Redhawk. Also, almost no holsters for 5.5" Redhawk. Millions for blackhawk.
     
  7. Onty

    Onty Member

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    Although, (my 0.2 cents) there is nothing that has a feel and balance of a single action, (I prefer Bisley), they do have their drawbacks. Frame and extractor housing screw do get loose, especially when shooting heavy loads and they have to be periodically checked. Better yet, some kind of securing with blue Loctite, clear nail polish or fishing line has to be used. I did put Loctite on my revolvers, but there is always that stupid suspicion that with heavy loads they might get loose. Also, cylinder pin could “walk” forward if locking latch doesn’t work properly. For that reason I always make sure that latch is pressed to make sure that it sits in its place.

    But, considering everything, I still think that, when field reliability is in the question, as a side arm Redhawk has the edge. On top of that, the trigger reach with slim grips is shorter than on most revolvers, an important issue for folks with shorter fingers. Yes, it’s more complex, heavier and with heavy loads it will kick you harder than single action SBH or Bisley. However, Redhawk is strong and durable and there is no a single screw to get loose. When properly tuned by skilled smith, 44 or better yet 45, Redhawk is IMHO the ultimate sidearm for hiking or as a backup gun in hunting.
     
  8. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    Though I like my 10 1/2 inch Super B, SS .44 mag, I don't like that the single action grip rolls up in the hand to dissipate recoil.

    I prefer the Smith grip that twists up and comes down in the same place in your hand. I'm a skinny guy, but the recoil never bothers me.

    Transferring a 29-2 nickled Smith 6" on Monday, hopefully. Price was right, and the fellow selling it needs the cash. If I can get him to the shop.

    I hesitate to mention looking at the auction sites. I have bought several BP guns and some semis there. If you quit before the price goes out of sight, you may get a deal.

    If you only buy new, ignore this.

    Cheers,

    George
     
  9. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    A little off topic, but can you still carry or even own a sidearm in Canada? I was under the impression it had gotten really draconian up there. I know I'd not wanna get caught at the border with one going in.
     
  10. Majic

    Majic Member

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    The strength of the SBH is not the concern using the hot Buffalo bore or Randy Garrett loads as it's full capable of handling the pressures. It's the shorter cylinder as compared to the RH that if the bullets jump crimp then the loads can tie the revolver up.
     
  11. TallPine

    TallPine Member

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    Doesn't the Redhawk have that little screw under the cylinder release...?

    :confused:
     
  12. Onty

    Onty Member

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    Oct 25, 2003
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    We can have handguns with certain restriction like proper storage and transport, no 32 and 25 cal, no handgun with barrel 105 mm or shorter (unless you have it from before 1994 if I am correct), no hollow point bullets, max 10 rounds, etc… Otherwise, no limit in number of handguns, no waiting period (except for transfer of the ownership). As for carrying sidearm around, this is only for the folks that have special permit like geologist, surveyors, biologists and others that work in remote wilderness. Occasionally, you can find that topic here: http://www.canadiangunnutz.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=73 . If you want to bring handgun here for target shooting, it could be done but you have to get the permit, although I was told that it’s not easy process.
     
  13. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    Just picked up a SBH for $200 including ammo and a holster :D

    I'm willing to bet that amount that I will NEVER IN MY LIFE find a Redhawk for anything like that price.

    I really like the piece. It has the primal look of a Dragoon to it, and would make a cool companion to Ruger No. 1.
     
  14. dairycreek

    dairycreek Member

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    My choice has been a Redhawk with a 5.5" barrel. Great shooter! Takes the "hottest" 44 mag ammo if you want. And, the 5.5" barrel makes it somewhat of an easier carry gun for the "woods and the plains". Sure has worked for me:eek:
     
  15. IV Troop

    IV Troop Member

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    Nov 14, 2005
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    Good Post!

    I too Have both 44 Blackhawks/Bisleys and a 44 Redhawk. Frankly, I would choose whichever I was able to shoot the best and whichever was the most comfortable to me.

    I prefer Bisley grip frames over standard Blackhawk grip frames for heavy recoiling loads. The Redhawk factory grips fit very well for me, though I have heard others say that they do not fit them at all.

    Go with what fits YOU the best.

    That being said, If I may make one suggestion. BUY QUALITY LEATHER to carry your gun in. A high quality holster on a stiff gunbelt makes all the difference in the world if you are going to pack a big gun around for days on end. There are a few high quality holster makers out there, I prefer Milt Sparks. I have some Sparks rigs that have seen very heavy use for years and still are in excellent shape.
     
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