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Reloading and homeowners insurance

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by cberge8, Dec 26, 2011.

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  1. cberge8

    cberge8 Member

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    I recently changed my homeowners insurance company; the new company has requested to do a walk through of the house. Has anyone else ever had any problems with reloading equipment and components causing problems for your insurance company?

    I really don't want to have to disassemble my entire bench and pack it up in the attic, any info would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. 92GreenYJ

    92GreenYJ Member

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    I can't say for sure but I am interested in the responses as the wife and I will be starting our house hunt after the new year.

    I gotta wonder how many joe averages would even know what reloading gear is let alone what it is used for. I'd say stash your powder out of sight and your probably good to go
     
  3. Revolver218

    Revolver218 Member

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    I wouldn't recommend you hide anything from the insurance company. Demonstrate you reload in a responsible manner (if asked, you may not be), proper storage of powder, primers and reloaded ammo. There also may be a limit on the amount of powder you can possess. They will be more concerned with any wood stove you use (a leading cause of fires) and storage of gas and/or propane, along with wiring, the condition of the roof, smoke detectors, etc. I doubt there will be a problem. How many fires/explosions have we ever heard of resulting from reloading or its components? I can't think of any.
     
  4. kelbro

    kelbro Member

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    I would not let them see it. Insurance companies are in business (for the most part) to NOT have to pay claims.
     
  5. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    You could take a picture of the powder display at a local store that sells to reloaders, and if there's a question, show them the picture and ask why if it's safe to sell powder off a shelf, then why would it be unsafe to have a smaller amount of powder in your shop?

    If you're really concerned, you can build a powder storage container out of wood, which is the recommended way to store it. Fire departments don't like metal containers for powder and primers, preferring the insulating qualities of wood and the fact that a wood container won't blow from trapped gasses.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  6. cberge8

    cberge8 Member

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    kelbro, my thoughts exactly.

    I do have a powder storage box, and a primer storage box that I made This sort of adds to the issue of "just picking all of the stuff up".

    If they give me any hassle over it, I think I may just ask to sign a waiver disallowing any claims originating from reloading activities or power/primer storage.
     
  7. Striker Fired

    Striker Fired Member

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    My agent knows I reload and my presses are even itemized on the policy like all my guns,computers, and other stuff that is worth $125-$150 or more .That way in the case of a fire most of my stuff is already listed as a predetermend replacement price and that is what I would get for them. They never said anything about the reloading supplies being a problem.
     
  8. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    Seems to me that the best way to build a case for not paying a claim would be if you are intentionally hiding something from them.

    That said, the gas can in your garage, the liquor cabinet, and likely the chemicals under the sink are all more volatile than gunpowder. As far as I know my homeowners insurance doesn't know specifically that I reload, but they haven't asked either. I don't see why it would be a problem as long as you are not storing it in quantities that violate local fire codes, etc... If you are worried, asking your insurance is the best course of action, and trying to hide something is likely the worst course of action.
     
  9. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    Just put it away.
     
  10. Flash!

    Flash! Member

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    I don't know about the insurance part, but I'm refinancing my home right now.... the appraiser came and took pictures of every room including the spare bedroom where my reloading bench is set up.... all the pictures including one of my reloading bench was sent to the mortgage company.....not a word was said about it and my loan was approved......
     
  11. leadchucker

    leadchucker Member

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    Has anyone ever seen any wording in a homeowner's insurance policy that could be used to deny coverage or claims because of normal ammunition reloading going on in the home?
     
  12. kelbro

    kelbro Member

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    To clarify, I based my opinion on the fact that I have way more powder and primers than I am supposed to.

    I do not tell my auto insurance people that I occasionally drive over the speed limit either :)
     
  13. leadchucker

    leadchucker Member

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    The trouble with not being straight with the insurance company is that in the event of a fire or disaster, if they find evidence of "having more powder/primers than you are supposed to", or similar situations, that is the legal loophole they need to weasel out of paying a claim.
     
  14. thorn-

    thorn- Member

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    My agent is aware of all the guns and components; it's not a problem whatsoever.

    However, as leadchucker pointed out: don't hide anything from your ins company. If you are not within the specs of your contract, they DONT have to pay if it's determined your dishonesty was a factor in the insurability of the claim under the agreed terms.

    thorn
     
  15. cvo

    cvo Member

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    Yea show them everything, even find some extra powder containers to sit around. Tell the inspector if your house catches on fire it will make a one mile crater. :neener: Seriously, put things away.
     
  16. Bovice

    Bovice Member

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    What Mama don't know won't hurt her. Put everything away.
     
  17. hvychev77

    hvychev77 Member

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    i've always felt like honesty is the best policy. i'd sure hate to think that if something did happen to my house such as a fire, or theft, and i go to make a claim they deny it because they didn't know what was in there. i am positive my insurance company works just as hard as i do to cover their butts. so, i'd be up front with 'em, and if they don't want to cover you because of it then it's their loss............just my .02 cents...........
     
  18. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Member

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    Not a word said

    We had a panel box fire 2 years back and I heard-found it before it did to much damage. The insurance co. was great fixing and paying for everything. My reloading bench and powder cabinet are about 20' from the panel box. The appraiser and state fire Marshall made their inspection before everything was fixed. My reloading bench is like my work bench, a mess most of the time. Powder and primers where put away as always. Not a word was said by either one as they did their inspection and they looked at everything. I have never heard of reloading being an issue with insurance. A commercial venue might make a difference though. I will add, my insurance never went up either. Hope this answers some questions.
     
  19. twohightech

    twohightech Member

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    Out of sight is what i would do. I would leave the work bench out. I keep most of my stuff "put up" when i'm not using it anyway. Unless you have alot of money in your set up and you want to be sure it is covered. Poeple get new things everyday
     
  20. Yoffione

    Yoffione Member

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    I have been an insurance agent for 20 years. You will have no issues on a home inspection and the reloading supplies. I would not worry about it. As for coverage on your reloading equipment, it is covered as personal property with no specific value limits. If you have replacement cost ( make sure you do ) it will apply to the reloading stuff.
     
  21. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    Insurance is just a game, but a game where your opponent can afford to pay the referee. As with any such game, you can't win by playing precisely by the rules.

    Put your components away. And once you're cleared and insured, use good sense. As somebody above said, the chances of reloading activities creating a claim situation are pretty low.
     
  22. psyshack

    psyshack Member

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    I wouldn't hide a thing. When we paid our home off, the shack that it is. We had to get new ins. Several company's didn't need to see in the house, just a fast drive by. Others wanted to inspect the inside.

    Of those that did a walk through and a quick attic peak nothing was said concerning the reloading bench, safe or guns. Other than what are they worth on the market and what are they worth to you? Same with the fish tanks and other hobby / improvement to life items in the house.

    It all worked out great and all bids were within $100 a year. With contents being worth three times what the house is worth.

    It's basic show them who you are and how you live, run and maintain your home. Then if they balk sue the crap out of them.....

    It also pay's in the long run to be with a co. you have a positive history with. We ended you going with our agent that has taken care of our auto ins. for years. She has seen to it that our policy for auto is at local rates. As if we work in the town we live in. Small town America. Truth is we drive 100 to 150 miles a day round trip to Tulsa. More times than not we carpool in together. But there are times we run both cars in and back. We get the good deal. :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011
  23. Deavis

    Deavis Member

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    So by that logic, since big banks can pay the ref, it's okay if I tell a few lies to extort money from them. That's okay right? No? Okay, well if they give me $1000 in error, its okay if I don't tell them about the mistake because its better to hide it. They don't pay enough interest anyhow. Right....

    Be upfront and honest. Take the highroad and ignore the advice about hiding things, lying by omission, or anything else that could cause you trouble down the road. Your insurance company will probably not care as long as you are following applicable fire code for your area. If they do, a simple phone call can solve the problem, afterall NFPA was recently updated to allow much more reasonable amounts of primers and the powder limitation is still pretty high for normal reloaders.

    Its been my experience that people are far more interested in a tour than giving me grief when they inspect and see my setup. You may make a new shooting buddy, there are more of us than you think.
     
  24. AABEN

    AABEN Member

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    Jest DON'T tell him you reload for any one! To reload for your self is OK. I reload in my garage and that is OK it is not hook to the house.
     
  25. snakeman

    snakeman Member

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    Just organize it and consider moving it to a shed. I'm an adjuster in training and a gun nut. That said they if the fact that you are storing explosives in your home isn't disclosed and you have a fire someday in which the powder or primers is even involved you could lose your donkey quick because they will not pay.
     
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