Reloading Ballistics Books

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by NuclearBuckshot, Jul 7, 2016.

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  1. NuclearBuckshot

    NuclearBuckshot Member

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    i am new to reloading. i have a Dillon Xl650 press. Dose anyone have an opinion on which is a better Reloading book Hornady or Nosler?
     
  2. IraqVet1982

    IraqVet1982 Member

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    I prefer the Lyman book, I think there's a wider array of data.
     
  3. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    #1 Lyman.
    #2 Speer.
    #3 Hornady.

    #10 Nosler.
    (Unless all you ever shoot is Nosler bullets.)
     
  4. Wil Terry

    Wil Terry Member

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    FRANKLY, they're all better !!! Every one of 'em without exception. I have a seven foot[7'] bookshelf with loading data going back to 1898 and sometimes it is still NOT enough.
    BUT 'EM ALL...you will need them.
    And so it goes...
     
  5. badkarmamib

    badkarmamib Member

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    Based on many recommendations, I have the Lyman's manual. This is a good book for wide coverage. Other than that, it is bullet and powder maker's books. If you are going to shoot primarily Nosler or Hornady bullets, get theirs. If you are going to use Hodgdon or Alliant powders, get theirs. But, bullet and powder manufacturers have a lot of the info on their websites, which you can access for free (but can't jot notes in, like a paper manual). But the Lyman's is a good cross-reference / second opinion to have for virtually any loading.
     
  6. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Hmmm, you got a Dillon 650 before you got a manual? Start with The ABCs of Reloading, a copy of Lyman's 49th or 50th, a manual from the manufacturer of the bullets you choose (Hornady, Sierra, Nosler, etc.). Read these then unbox your progressive, and good luck.

    Go slow, double check everything, and be safe...
     
  7. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Dillon has literature and videos on how to run THEIR machines.

    The manuals tell you what is going on at each step.

    Load data is the last thing to look for.
     
  8. NuclearBuckshot

    NuclearBuckshot Member

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    Thank you all for your comments.
     
  9. NuclearBuckshot

    NuclearBuckshot Member

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    Mdi,

    I bought it because I got a great deal on it new. However I've not nor will I do any reloading without first reading the proper guides. I just was wondering what people on here favor. Yes I realize i put the cart before the horse on this one. But it was the right price at the right time.
     
  10. badkarmamib

    badkarmamib Member

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    Exactly how I got started. Admittedly, I have only been reloading for a month or so. I knew I wanted a single stage, because I like the technique, and have more time than money to put towards the hobby. So, I got the kit I wanted, because it was less than half price. Then, like you, I came here to get advice on a manual/manuals. I got some of the same responses, and couldn't convince some that I wasn't going to blow myself up before reading a manual.

    Some things, like presses, are subjective; you like what you like. Some things, like manuals, are objective; there are some that are better than others. Then, there are the in-betweens, like powder and bullets. Some may work better, but you can still go with something else.

    Now that you have your press, I suggest at least Lyman's. By now, you have watched enough YouTube to get an idea of how reloading works. A good manual will guide you to the best equipment and components for what you will be loading. Then, you will have everything set up, and be ahead of the curve.
     
  11. orpington

    orpington Member

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    What reloading books date to 1898 (or earlier)? I ENJOY reading the historical ones and I thought I had one of the earliest ones, Handloading Ammunition, by Mattern, from 1926, but it appears that this book isn't even close to being one of the earliest ones out there.
     
  12. thomas15

    thomas15 Member

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    OP, What are your handloading goals? Rifle, handgun, target, hunting, high volume, accuracy and so forth. Do you have any experience handloading? Do you have any friends that handload? Do you have any other equipment besides the press?

    BTW, you will find that handloading manuals are boring to read. Concentrate on the part about safety and proper selection of components. If your going to handload handgun ammo, skip the part in almost every manual that discusses trimming brass to length. No one trims straight wall handgun brass.
     
  13. SwaneeSR

    SwaneeSR Member

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    OP - first of all, welcome to The High Road.

    The Lyman manuals are good. I have the 48th and 49th, the 50th is newly released if you find it. I have a bookshelf full of manuals.

    You need to pick which caliber to begin your reloading journey. I started with 9mm on my Dillon 550B. I use the data on the Hodgdon website and compare to my manuals. I assume the 650 came setup for something.

    Swanee
     
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