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reloading in the car?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Clark, Oct 2, 2012.

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  1. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Clark,
    I friend set up a reloading bench in his van and I made a suggestion that helped him save space. Instead of what you did I suggested using a table in which the top of the table folds down flat against the side of the van until needed and when lifted the front legs drop down. Two strong legs in the front and hinged in the back makes for a very sturdy bench and it doubles as a table for eating.
     
  2. Clark

    Clark Member

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    Where I5 meets the rain forest
    Reloadingincar10-28-2012.jpg

    Since my OP:
    I bought a copy of Quickload to put on my brother's computer.
    He lives where I hunt.
    I bought another RCBS Aluminum Partner press, so I could have two presses; one to size and one to seat.
    I drove 888 miles to get there.
    I handloaded for 3 rifles that I just built; 1885 257RAIR, Rem700 7mmRM, and 98 commercial Mauser 260 Rem small primer.
    I sighted in the scopes and practiced for 7 days.
    I shot two deer.
    I drove back 888 miles.

    What did I learn?
    1) The RCBS uniflow powder measure handle must be tied down during transport, or powder gets all over the floor.
    2) The RCBS 505 powder scale should have the pan and pan support removed during transport, or it crashes around and makes noise.
    3) The RCBS uniflow powder measure needs to be mounted in way that is easy to remove to empty the powder back into the jug. Some 7/8-14 threads cut into the reloading bench will help, and then use an old die and lock ring.
    4) The vehicle is never near level. Take a bunch of wedges or spacers to make it level.
    5) It is hard to reload in a vehicle when the vehicle is all full of stuff.
    6) Don't try to straighten out more than one gun at a time. Last year I build a VZ24 7mmRM and had it shooting well to 500 yards. This year I built a 257 Roberts Ackley Improved rimmed and only had time to get it shooting well to 400 yards.
    7) 308 Lapua palma brass with small primer pocket, necked down to 260, neck turned, 120 gr Nosler BT moly, and CCI 450 small rifle magnum primers will set off 40 gr of CFE, but not 42 gr.
    8) Norma 7x57 Mauser rimmed, necked down to 257 Roberts, and neck turned, has soft case heads that get loose primer pockets with 51 gr H4350 3175 fps 115 gr Nos BT moly, but ok with 49 gr 3050 fps.
    9) Don't think your friends have any place warmer than 65 degrees where then will let you spray paint your rifles and stocks with Alunihide II, when the outside temp in 30 degrees.
    Clarkexpainingthe257RAIRhandloadingtothebutcher10-25-2012tiny.jpg
    10) Sometimes a mule buck is so long that the butcher's hook and rail system makes the buck's nose drag on the floor. Earlier, to get that big deer into the back of my vehicle I hung his neck with a rope from the passenger handle. [just like the reloading bench]. Then I lifted his feet into my vehicle. Then I pushed his middle inside. It was hard because I could only lift about 1/3 of the deer's weight. It's a good thing I learned about the vehicle's structure from mounting the reloading bench.
     
  3. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    Now that is a good size Buck alright. You should get a good part of your freezer filled with that one!

    I won't comment on your 115gr .257 Roberts load with 51gr of H4350, or the 49.gr load either! :rolleyes:
     
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