Quantcast

Reloading in the garage

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Blasting_Cap, Sep 6, 2020.

  1. Blasting_Cap

    Blasting_Cap Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Hi guys, I'm wanting to get into reloading and have limited space in the garage but I'm concerned that flying sparks from other projects could cause a obviously large problem. I plan to keep primers, powder, reloaded ammo in the house after use. Would putting a cover over the press keep things safe? A divider that covers the entire bench? Both a cover and a divider? What suggestions do you experienced folks have?
     
  2. Obturation
    • Contributing Member

    Obturation Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2018
    Messages:
    2,655
    Location:
    Northern illinois
    If there's no gun powder , nothing to worry about. Store components away from fire & sparks or excessive moisture and you'll be fine. I'd cover your press just to keep grit & garage spiders off .
     
    Bfh_auto, Toprudder, sparkyv and 7 others like this.
  3. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,865
    Location:
    Colorado
    My reloading bench is in my garage and it hasn’t been a problem. I keep it pretty clean, and any welding, grinding or whatever is on the other end of the garage, or outside.

    Use your head, cover up what you must as needed, and find a way for it to work!
     
  4. Skeeter300

    Skeeter300 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2019
    Messages:
    25
    I load in the garage without issue. Cover the press and you are good to go.
     
    Bfh_auto, magyars4 and LoonWulf like this.
  5. Blasting_Cap

    Blasting_Cap Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    What is your cleaning procedure? Do you just wipe up with a wet rag to get any spilled powder or residual?
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  6. Jesse Heywood

    Jesse Heywood Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,875
    Location:
    Kansas
    No problem if you clean up the powder spills. But a plastic cover will keep your press clean. Think trash bag.
     
    Alex Clayton and LoonWulf like this.
  7. frankmako

    frankmako Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    Messages:
    684
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    don't over think this. if you got that many sparks in your garage then i would worry about other problems.
     
  8. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Messages:
    1,413
    Location:
    Memphis
    Carburendum dust will wreck any precision surface it comes into contact with. Dies, rams are very susceptible to this contamination. I would be very careful to keep your reloading equipment free of metal working contamination. It's very possible as my dad was a machinist and welder, but proper precautions need be taken.
     
    Bfh_auto, Poper, Toprudder and 2 others like this.
  9. mokin

    mokin Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,800
    Location:
    Western Colorado
    At one point I had two single stage presses, a progressive, and a shotshell press set up in the garage. Like others said, just clean up after a batch of ammunition. As I had many other flammable materials stored there anything involving fire/sparks usually took place outside.
     
    Hokie_PhD and LoonWulf like this.
  10. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    5,864
    In my former house, I had a 3 car garage and one entire bay was my reloading bench; no problems. As mentioned, put a plastic garbage bag or similar over the press to keep debris from settling on it.
     
    Hokie_PhD and magyars4 like this.
  11. Alex Clayton

    Alex Clayton Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2020
    Messages:
    540
    To have a fire you would have to have powder laying out. I just toss an old sheet over my stuff when I am doing something that will make a mess so as to keep the mess out of the reloading tools.
     
  12. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    9,829
    Location:
    East TN
    You're not supposed to leave powder in the powder measure anyway after a reloading session. So, empty the powder measure when done and return the unused primers to their original containers.

    Store the flammable stuff somewhere other than the garage and cover the equipment to protect it from dust.

    Lots of good suggestions already posted.
     
  13. Glockula

    Glockula Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2013
    Messages:
    517
    Location:
    Eastern NC
    When I loaded in the garage I stored my components, other than brass, in doors. It worked well
     
    George P likes this.
  14. edwardware

    edwardware Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    Messages:
    2,928
    I cover the entire bench with a sheet if I'm going to dust, just to cut down on cleaning and grit. Other than that, no special measures.
     
  15. Pat Riot
    • Contributing Member

    Pat Riot Contributing Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2015
    Messages:
    2,616
    Empty powder measure.
    Store powder and primer in the house.
    Cover equipment and or bench.

    The big worry would be if you were using Black Powder or its substitutes. Loose smokeless powder isn’t as sensitive or volatile but keeping a clean reloading area just makes good sense.
     
    Poper and Toprudder like this.
  16. South Prairie Jim

    South Prairie Jim Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2019
    Messages:
    1,412
    Location:
    Libby Mt
    My wife decided that her car needed to be in my reloading room which left me no choice but to relocate to the kitchen :cool:
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Blasting_Cap

    Blasting_Cap Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    I apparently built it up in my head to be much more dangerous, but I don't really know the process yet. I feel much safer knowing that there is no powder left out etc.
     
  18. jmorris

    jmorris Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    16,045
    I have set off dropped primers in my shop, with sparks and one with some 3/4” hot rolled bar, dropped just right.
     
    Demi-human and Toprudder like this.
  19. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2017
    Messages:
    3,328
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    You don't mention where you are...

    Guns have two enemies... rust and politicians. That follows that reloading equipment does, too.

    I used to reload in the garage... but I don't anymore. I live in north Dallas, which has a fair amount of humidity... it was wrecking my equipment. There is also the issue of a corrosive atmosphere (think pool chlorine stored in the garage, etc.)

    Here are the main parts of a RCBS Reloader Special 3 press that was left in the garage... next to the chlorine bucket...

    8koogrJl.jpg

    I was able to clean up the components... but the damage was done. Looking closely at the bearing surface, you can see the stippling in the machined surfaces. Luckly, this is a light-duty press... just a seater and crimp press.

    vwlB8zAl.jpg

    As far as sparks or something like that? As long as you maintain workbench cleanliness, you won't have any problems.
     
    Toprudder, magyars4 and dcarr like this.
  20. Blasting_Cap

    Blasting_Cap Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    I'm in SWFL the garage gets super hot and sometimes humid but doesn't seem to be rusting any other equipment stored in there at least for now.
     
    George P and Charlie98 like this.
  21. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    9,829
    Location:
    East TN
    I've lived in New Orleans and various other places around the southeast. Since my garage is always a shop, it is climate controlled, both for humidity control and the comfort of the user.

    Reloading was in the garage in New Orleans but every move since, we've bought a house with reloading space indoors.
     
    Beach Bum likes this.
  22. Charlie98

    Charlie98 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2017
    Messages:
    3,328
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    I commandeered a closet up in the craft room. It wasn't much space, but it was big enough, and waaaay better than the garage. I have since, fighting the war of insurgency, taken over the entire room at this point... ;)
     
  23. 748

    748 member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Messages:
    1,287
    Location:
    clovis, NM
    I would be more worried about tracking lead into the house if the garage were attached.
     
    Toprudder likes this.
  24. scotty

    scotty Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    california
    I reloaded in my garage for 20 years starting with an RCBS single stage press, later buying a Dillon 550. I kept my powder and primers in a closet in the house. No problems. Later the kids grew up and moved away and the wife and I parted ways. About a year ago I turned an empty bedroom into a man cave/reloading room. Much nicer not having to freeze/roast my butt while reloading. I still store my brass and do my tumbling in the garage.
     
    George P, TxWolf, Poper and 2 others like this.
  25. dh1633pm

    dh1633pm Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2009
    Messages:
    2,729
    Location:
    Central New York
    I reload in the basement which has its own set of challenges, not unlike a garage. When I lived in Albuquerque years ago I reloaded in the garage. Humidity and heat are always an issue. My basement now has AC, but it still more humid that the rest of the house. I always keep my stuff we lubed to prevent corrosion. I did note some surface rust yesterday on the handle of my C&H Press yesterday. I have been gone for a couple weeks for work. The AC was turned up while I was gone, thereby increasing humidity more. I cleaned it up and looked for more, that was all I could find. As we move into fall, dampness will increase.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
    Toprudder and NC9mm like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice