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Reloading

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by whelen, Dec 25, 2006.

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  1. whelen

    whelen Member

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    I am going to start reloading for the first time any advise for a beginner?
    I will be loading 243, 35 whelen, and 300 win Mag.
     
  2. Father Knows Best

    Father Knows Best Member

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    Sure. Start with a really good loading manual, and read it cover-to-cover several times before you buy any equipment. I recommend Modern Reloading by Richard Lee to start. While it does contain a little puffery for Lee equipment, it's not offensive salemanship and the info on how to reload is excellent.

    If you have a store nearby that sells reloading equipment and supplies, go talk to them. They'll provide great advice, too.
     
  3. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    I prefer the Hornady reloading manual though I have the Lee manual as well.

    My reloading setup is an RCBS kit that contained the press, scale and powder measure that I bought around 1983. I've loaded thousands of rounds on it from pistol rounds up to 458 Lott and have never felt the need for more complex or faster equipment.

    Other things you'll need are dies (for bolt action and single shots I use Lee Collet dies and RCBS for most others) and a case trimmer or trim dies.
     
  4. Father Knows Best

    Father Knows Best Member

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    The Hornady manual is good, too. As you get into reloading, you'll build up quite a library of manuals. I have at least a dozen by now. But for starting out, you need one good one that includes excellent step-by-step instructions with simple explanations. For that, I think Lee's Modern Reloading is the gold standard.

    As for equipment, the manuals will explain what you need, and generally include a nice checklist. The various "starter" kits are good. My favorite first press is the RCBS Rockchucker single stage, and it is available in a decent kit at a good price.

    'course, reloading is addictive. My wife says that I shoot just so I have an excuse to reload some more. I now have four presses (RCBS Rockchucker, two Dillon RL550B's and a Dillon SL900), and do my best to keep them all in use. :D
     
  5. DaveInFloweryBranchGA

    DaveInFloweryBranchGA Member

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    There's a sticky at the top of the forum written specifically to help out new reloaders. That's probably be a good place to start.

    Regards,

    Dave
     
  6. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    1)...read the "sticky" at the top

    2)...learn to use the "search" feature for this forum

    I've been a member here since the first week. There is nothing that hasn't been answered multiple times. Rather than waiting for an answer, you can get it immediately.
     
  7. trkyshootr

    trkyshootr Member

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    I agree that a reloading manual is a good place to start. I find them enjoyable to read and that I continue, almost 20 years later, to learn. I have more than a dozen, with the Speer and Sierra manuals being my favorite. Both have very good powder selections. Although many people prefer the Hornady, it, as compared to other manuals, often has only 50 - 70% the number of powder choices per caliber. Additionally, it would be wise to purchase more than one manual. I have seen instances where one book has max loads that are below the start load listed in another.

    In addition to your press, dies, and scale, which are necessities, there are other, relatively inexpensive, items which are very useful. A powder trickler, calipers, bullet puller, case trimmer, and case mouth deburring/chamfering tool are all near-necessities. Many other items will prove helpful and will speed the process or otherwise make it more precise, efficient, or enjoyable.

    In my experience, it is vital to go slow. Mistakes will be made, and time needs be taken to check and double-check each step. Fortunately, in tens of thousands of rounds, I've only loaded and fired one squib load. However, I have done plenty of stupid things that were caught in advance. I hate to admit this, but primers have been loaded upside down, rounds have been created with no primer, and much powder has been spilled. There's lots to learn, but reloading can also be very enjoyable.

    Good luck and safe shooting.

    Merry Christmas.
     
  8. rwmcquigge

    rwmcquigge Member

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    hey bro its me

    i have the lee reloaders guide, i will send it to you as soon as i can,have a couple others for you to.your going to like the stuff for the .35 wh.:banghead: :what:
     
  9. whelen

    whelen Member

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    Book's

    Ok sounds good!!!!! I seen Marks 300 SA ULTRA MAG
     
  10. qajaq59

    qajaq59 Member

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    Keep in mind

    that you can get compromise loads in any store, so you don't need to load any of those. Go slow and be picky about your loads. And most important of all, have some fun. It's a great hobby that saves us a few bucks, but mainly it's a hobby that can give you a lot of satisfaction if you do it correctly.
     
  11. USSR

    USSR Member

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    whelen,

    Yeah, buy lot's of Reloader 22. It is one powder that will work well across all the cartridges you will be reloading for.

    Don
     
  12. scrat

    scrat Member

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    lee is your friend.

    before buying any equipment shop around. Then again before you buy any equipment figure out if you are going to do some mass bulk reloading or just occasionally when you have the time. I have the lee classic single stage. Fits me good. i take my time reloading. Im not into mass qty. Same time this gives me an excuse on having something to do. Once you decide that. Then next step is determining what brand. I will tell you the lee aniversary kit is hard to pass up. It has everything you need minus the dyes. However that is up to you. Next step where to buy. Shop around ebay has some of the best deals around. However you check your local gunshop. What i have found is this.

    buying powder. Buy from local gun shop. Why???? If you buy over the internet then you end up paying a hazmat fee. the hazmat fee can be more than the powder

    Buying bullets. Unless you are buying at 500-1000 or more bullets. Compare to your local gunshop then check ebay. I find my local Turners has sierra and speer that run for around 15.00 for 100 bullets. If i can get a better deal off ebay then i will buy them on ebay. Has to be better with shipping. Other wise buy in bulk.

    Buying primer. No biggie Turners has large rifle for 2.39 for 100. Lock stock and barrel has them for 3.15. Since these are so cheap i buy about 5-10 packs from turners.

    There you have it. Read more. when you get your supplies make sure you buy a bullet puller. Then practice a couple rounds without powder and primer. If they come out ok then make some real ones. Then practice using your pullet puller.
     
  13. Smokey Joe

    Smokey Joe Member

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    Good advice.

    Whelan--Lotsa good advice above. I would only add, READ AND STUDY--you can't have too much knowledge.

    When starting in a new endeavor, it is a good idea to read the "standard text" on the subject. In reloading, this is a book surprisingly titled, The ABC's of Reloading. It is put out by Krause Publications, www.krause.com

    Get it at yr local sptg gds sto, gun sho, Barnes & Noble, order from the I'net, or buy it through the publisher's website. But get it and read it.

    It is not a reloading manual (you'll need one of those, too. My go-to manual is Lyman's 48th edition.) but rather a how-to and more importantly why-and-why-not-to sort of book. Belongs on every reloader's bookshelf, well thumbed, IMHO.

    They must be doing something right; the book is in its 7th edition. If you run across an old 6th edition, that is good too. (No experience with nos 1-5 but I bet they are fine also.)

    Anyhow, get yrself an ABC's and read it. You'll be glad you did.
     
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