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Rem 11-48: spare parts I should buy?

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by edwardware, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    I have an opportunity to buy a Remington 11-48 12ga shotgun for a good price. The stock is rough and metal is speckled from neglect. I won't get to test fire it, but I have field stripped it and it appears complete and in working order.

    If I buy this, what parts should I buy for my spare parts collection?

    It seems a recoil spring, brass friction ring, firing pin, magazine spring, hammer spring, and sear & hammer would be sensible. What else should I buy before all the parts dry up?
     
  2. paulsj

    paulsj Member

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    Buy second-hand 1100/11-87 instead. If you set on recoil-operated type pick Luigi Franchi 48AL insted.
     
  3. AeroDillo

    AeroDillo Member

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    Parts may be available. They probably are.

    That said, I learned (secondhand) from a classmate that full disassembly of an 11-48 requires a special tool not commercially available, so any internal maintenance or refinish issues can increase exponentially in cost and return time if put in the shop. And as ever...the trouble with bargain-priced guns usually disappears once you start pricing furniture and components.

    PaulSJ has the right idea. Older and newer shotguns with abundant parts are available. Unless you absolutely need an 11-48 to round out the collection, I'd pass.
     
  4. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    So, y'all would pass at $150? That's surprising; I've always read about these being great shotguns.
     
  5. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    They were until the gas-operated Models 58 and 1100 superseded it. The long recoil of the 11-48 is much more harsh than the 58/1100.

    Jim
     
  6. kudu
    • Contributing Member

    kudu Moderator Staff Member

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    For $150 go for it, may be a diamond in the rough. If it breaks down the road, then figure out how to fix it. Until then go break some clays with it or dust some bunnies or doves. It is still a classic Remington. Photos are required if you purchase. :scrutiny:
     
  7. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    That's what I'm thinking. I probably won't break 1,000 clays in my life, but I like restoring interesting old guns.

    I'm STILL interested in recommendations for spare parts to buy!
     
  8. old fart

    old fart Member

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    i would try numrich, ebay and gun broker, i would get all the spares i could afford. i try to have spares for my guns and do. but i only have 3 guns a shotgun a revolver and 22 rifle but i have spares for all.
     
  9. entropy

    entropy Member

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    The parts that wear out the most, which fortunately are the same as the 1100; extractor, extractor plunger, extractor spring, shell latch.
     
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  10. PabloJ

    PabloJ Member

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    Buying spare parts that may never break makes no sense and is a waste of money. I would buy current production gun second hand if new gun price is an issue.
     
  11. entropy

    entropy Member

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    In one sense, I agree with you, because I am the guy you'd bring it in to to fix it. In another sense again, YOUR OPINION. Not everyone is of the consumerist "buy it, use, it, toss it' mentality.
     
  12. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    I lived next door to the local repair gunsmith in the Bicentennial era. He complained about working on the 11-48. Apparently there were multiple issues of recoil spring, even within the same gauge. Getting the one that a given gun would function with could be a guessing game, serial number ranges were not always a reliable indicator.
     
  13. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    I've found that the little detent ball in the bolt carrier that holds in the bolt handle can get really jammed. I've had to replace one, and the one I got to replace it is really really stiff and probably won't last through a couple more disassembly cycles. The metal behind the detent is thin and I've blown it right out trying to free up the ball.
     
  14. old fart

    old fart Member

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    most of the time i can buy a few parts here and there but not another gun, being on fixed income it took me over a year to save for a used maverick 88. buying just a few parts that cost about $10 one month and another next month is easier than getting a whole gun. at least for me, now if i could get a new gun every 3-6 months then i would probably just do that but i can't so i got to do what i can.
     
  15. Fleetman

    Fleetman Member

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    image.jpg image.jpg I haven't had any trouble with mine and I'll take a recoil over gas any day. Besides, its hard to find 2 x 4's like these. The blueing is too pretty to show.....
     
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  16. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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  17. mgmorden

    mgmorden Member

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    My dad has an old one that he rarely shoots. Only thing that I recall having to replace on it was the little "fingers" that act as the guide rod behind the bolt.

    While I'd say get it for $150, I'd not waste money on spare parts. Realistically, every $ you put into it lessens the deal of a low price, and you're basically playing fortune teller: you might buy a whole bucket load of spare parts and either never need any, or happen to need the one thing you didn't buy.

    If something breaks, find the part then. Ebay or an equivalent will be around for a long time and I'm sure if it's not your only gun it won't be a rush to get it repaired.
     
  18. Rudolph31

    Rudolph31 Member

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    I'd avoid the 11-48. It was a simplified, cheaper to make Model 11. They got some things right, like the quick handling (which can still be found on the 1100). But internally it wears out quickly. The biggest problem is Locking Block / Barrel Extension wear. Parts are scarce and changing out an extension is a major repair. There's a good reason that these guns are so inexpensive.
     
  19. Fleetman

    Fleetman Member

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    I shoot skeet with mine.....I'm sure some folks have had problems with (insert any brand here) firearms but the problems are are not near as it appears in forums.

    Anyway, for me, recoil works "easier".
     
  20. DanLee

    DanLee Member

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    I have a 16-gauge Sportsman 48, basically the same gun with the magazine tube crimped to limit the number of shells it can hold (2). I've not replaced any parts in the 15 years I've owned it. Well, except for swapping barrels with a guy who wanted an IC choked barrel; I wanted a full choked barrel, so we are both happy. Ebay has plenty of parts if I ever need anything replaced. I doubt that will change unless some TV show or movie makes the 11-48 a must-have item for the hipsters. Don't laugh. It happened with the S&W 29.
     

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