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Rem 700 build from .270 to?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by tom unler, Dec 18, 2018.

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  1. tom unler

    tom unler Member

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    Greetings all.
    I purchased an essentially unfired 700 BDL in .270. It's a lightweight rifle with no recoil pad.
    Finally got a chance to pull the trigger and it kicked the snot out of me, tried a few more and gave up.

    Thinking a re-stock, Timney and Remington target barrel, similar to 40-X

    Caliber ideas? New bolt and go up?
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    For what use?

    I have a 700 BDL in .30-06 that I bought about 30 years ago. I used it for groundhogs in the summer and deer in the fall for a long time. I have never found the recoil to be bad. Mine still has the plastic pad....In your case, I would think a good fitted recoil pad would be better than building a new gun.
     
  3. BigBore44

    BigBore44 Member

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    I agree. A good recoil pad will probably make all the difference. Also what weight bullet were you shooting? Were you shooting off a bench? Prone?
     
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  4. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Recoil pad, reshoot. Then restock (I like Boyds if ultra-lite isn't important) and reshoot. No reason a property stocked .270 should hurt.
     
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  5. Random 8

    Random 8 Member

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    You have a basically unfired rifle, why would you want to rebuild it into something it's not? Plenty of low-end donors out there for that. I would add a quality pad IF the basic fit of the stock is right for you. My wife had recoil issues when she first got her .308. The stock stock (deliberate double) had too long a LOP and not enough drop for her high cheekbones. A Richards Microfit "Frontier Sportster" with 1" off the LOP and some strategic sanding on the comb turned it into a very comfortable shooter. I like that stock style, as well as their dual grip thumbhole for taming recoil and improving field position ergonomics. Available in various hardwoods or laminate colors. The laminates will add a few ounces of weight vs. walnut, with Claro walnut running the lightest.

    Edit to add to my thoughts. Stock fit and form do more to tame recoil than weight or caliber selection within the same family. I've always found the Remington stocks to be a little jolty. Not sure what the point of a long action 40x clone would be, unless you have some really long shooting on game, in which case you're getting into calibers with more horsepower than your .270. If this is the case, .280AI or 6.5-06 are about the only ones that will stretch it's legs a bit without going into the magnum realm and bolt/magazine work. If you wanted to keep it as a lighter weight sporter, 6.5x55 would lower your recoil significantly and in a long action you could take full advantage of the round's capacity with 6,5SKAN data from Lapua. You could also add some lead strips under glass bedding in the barrel channel and some shot in an elmers wood glue matrix in a recess drilled into the stock under your new pad if you simply wanted to add weight.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
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  6. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    A Remington BDL is among the heavier rifles out there and 270 isn't known for excessive recoil. Most recoil is between the ears. This isn't a hard kicking rifle, but you've convinced yourself it is. One of the modern hi-tech recoil pads makes a huge difference, but you'll need to have the stock cut shorter or the overall length of the stock will probably be too long.

    Any other long action cartridge you were to re-barrel to would recoil as much or more. Possibly build something in 6.5CM or 7-08 built on a long action which could be an advantage. But financially you're better off selling it then buying something else.
     
  7. Newtosavage

    Newtosavage Member

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    I'm sorry, but I'm going to call BS on this and all the other "it's not bad" comments above. Guys, just because you don't mind the recoil from a .270 doesn't mean everyone shouldn't. Yes, a good recoil pad will make a lot of difference and I agree the OP should try that, but can we dispense with the "it doesn't bother me, so it shouldn't bother you" nonsense? This is truly one of my pet peeves, right along with X binocular is "better" than Y binocular because I said so. LOL

    If the OP wants a lighter kicking caliber, then we should help them figure out what that is, or maybe suggest reloading their current .270 to create a lower recoil load that is more pleasant and undoubtedly more accurate for them to shoot.

    <rant off>
     
  8. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

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    I agree with the recoil pad idea.
    Pachmyer and limb saver make good ones
     
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  9. roc1

    roc1 Member

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    If you reload you can load H4895 down to reduced loads or probably can buy factory ammo . Remington makes it in 30-06 not sure about 270. My fix was a muzzle brake huge difference. Went from 10-12 rounds tops to over a box at one setting no issues. My rifle is a Remington 700 so having it threaded was not expensive well worth it. You can get a nobe threaded brake from Witt machine they work great also,have a few on target rifles. They keep muzzle jump down so you can stay on target at longer ranges big help.
    Hope this helps
    Roc1
     
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  10. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    .270 is, in fact, on the lower end of centerfire rifles, especially in an 8 lb gun, yielding only about 16-17 ft/lbs at a modest 11-12 FPS. Virtually the same as .308 Win.

    https://www.chuckhawks.com/recoil_table.htm

    To get appreciably below that, one is looking at .284 cal & smaller short action choices.

    OP needs to just stick a decent pad on there and try it again. If it's a standard BDL with hard plastic butt plate, that relatively mild impulse can feel pretty sharp, especially off the bench. Suppressing it will also make a big difference, dropping felt recoil down to about that of a .243.
     
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  11. TN Outlaw

    TN Outlaw Member

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    I agree with most of what's been said. There seems to be more at play here than just recoil.

    Either,
    You are a very recoil sensitive person, which there is nothing wrong with that, several people are. If that's the case, it'll make chambering selection a little tougher. If the gun was a little uncomfortable to shoot or a little "sharp", choices wouldn't be so narrow but the fact that a .270Win in a BDL is rocking you so bad says to me simply dropping down 2-4ft/lbs of recoil isn't going to make shooting very comfortable for you.

    Or (and this what I would bet on),
    The rifle don't quite fit you and it needs a better recoil pad. It's surprising how much difference having the length of pull and cheek rise correct to your body will improve comfort in shooting a rifle. It drives the recoil in line to be soaked up in the meat of your shoulder where it belongs. Then a good recoil pad decelerates that recoil and wallah! The same rifle becomes fun to shoot. I'm betting this is the direction you should try before anything else. Recoil pad 1st, then go from there.
     
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  12. Dr T

    Dr T Member

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    The 25-06 word be a step down if shortening the pull and a Limbsaver are not enough.

    I have found that felt recoil is driven to a large extent by how you are holding the stock. I tend to grip the fore end tight on heavy recoiling guns. This transfers some of the recoil to the other shoulder and upper body.
     
  13. Jack B.

    Jack B. Member

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    Put a recoil pad on it and go shoot it. If a 270 kicked the snot out of you ,then you are holding it wrong or something.
     
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  14. Newtosavage

    Newtosavage Member

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    Thanks for illustrating my point.

    Folks are so eager to tell someone to just "man up" without even knowing what they intend to use the rifle for...

    Today's modern calibers and bullets are so much more efficient than those old '06-based cartridges, that it makes sense to explore all the options available now.

    For example, my 6.5 Grendel bolt gun is throwing a 130 grain bullet with better sectional density than a .270 at plenty of pace to hunt deer inside of 400 yards, and it has half the recoil of a .270 shooting a 130-grain bullet. The 6.5 CM throws a 140 grain bullet with better SD at an even greater pace, still with less recoil than the .270. That means the chances of the shooter putting the round on target are much better, not to mention how much powder one saves if they reload.

    If elk are on the menu, then there are still lower recoil options than the .270 that will do as good or perhaps even a better job, like my 7mm-08.

    People come here seeking advice because of the experience and knowledge on this forum. Telling someone it's "in their head" or to just man up probably isn't what they are after. I agree that a good recoil pad should be the first logical step, but the opinions about whether the .270 kicks a lot or a little don't matter at all to the OP. The only thing that matters is how they feel about it.
     
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  15. gotboostvr

    gotboostvr Member

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    I'd try either a cheap slip on recoil pad or maybe filling the factory stock with lead shot first. If it helps, great. If it's a improvement for comfort, but not ergonomics I'd then get a new stock.

    If that's still too much, maybe rebarrel to 6- or 6.5-06 if you're a hand loader or maybe 243 if you're not.
     
  16. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    There is do much unsaid that a truly reasoned response is very, very tough to give.

    What is it’s intended use? Fun at the range? For hunting deer, elk, moose?

    With out knowing what it’s going to be used for the suggestions to try a recoil pad and possibly alter the LOP to make the stock a better fit are entirely reasonable. Mass produced guns fit the fictional average shooter, and these low cost alterations can mean a world of difference comfort-wise.

    If, after trying the pad and stock fit changes ...and then experimenting by using low recoil loads... you find the kick is still too much, I’ll avoid all the back and forth and say the gun just isn’t for you. It’s ok, we all have a limit to what we can tolerate (My kryptonite was the Browning A-bolt in .338 Win Mag).

    In that instance I would sell it and buy something that kicks less.

    Good luck and stay safe!
     
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  17. shooter1niner

    shooter1niner Member

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    Many whom complain of recoil don't hold the rifle correctly. Pull the rifle firmly into the pocket of your shoulder and become one with the gun. Try shooting lighter bullets and then there's always the recoil pad.
     
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  18. Frostbite

    Frostbite Member

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    A good recoil pad makes a huge difference in felt recoil. Adequate hearing protection, such as double hearing protection, also makes a difference in how we perceive what happens when we shoot.

    After some reading about it, I would also think 6.5 Grendel is a good answer if recoil is a problem in a deer hunting rifle, but since OP already has a .270 Winchester, a fine caliber for hunting, it might be fun for him to enjoy that particular rifle. Then, if OP reloads, he probably already knows he can reload milder than factory loads.

    OP asked about a new caliber for the rifle. Without knowing the intended use for the rifle and given the present caliber of the rifle, which is just about perfect for hunting North America, I am a little shy to suggest any other option.

    If shooting paper at 200 yards was the main objective, I would recommend what I did: buy a .223 for a range toy and keep the bigger caliber for hunting. Recoil's effects are cumulative; usually, one single shot at a game animal does not produce significant discomfort.
     
  19. Garandimal

    Garandimal Member

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    1. Get off the bench and learn to shoot a High-power rifle.
    2.
    WP-20180617-11-54-18-Pro-2-crop.jpg

    WP_20180617_11_55_52_Pro.2.jpg



    GR
     
  20. VoodooMountain

    VoodooMountain Member

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    I hate to imagine how wrong I was when I discovered the puny 308 was uncomfortable to shoot in a savage 10 synthetic stock.

    In the same gun the 243 was absolutely pleasant to shoot but the 308 was very uncomfortable.

    The same gun in 270 with a wood stock offered very stiff recoil as well. All 3 were shot on the same day back to back. And all this was before my shoulder surgery.

    Stock fitment plays an huge role in felt recoil but so does weight of rifle and the round.

    Even a 30/30 or 410 can be uncomfortable in the wrong rifle.

    A friend of mine had to sell his axis in 308 because recoil was too stiff. He now shoots a howa in 25/06 and likes it much more.

    17 ft/lb recoil energy is at the top end of of the comfort level for most people and is about on par with a lot of 30-06 loads.

    So I guess what I'm saying is if 270 is too much to be comfortable then :

    1.) Don't fret. It is too much for more guys than they will admit

    2.) A 25/06 is a great compromise. Especially with 100 gr. Bullets.

    3.) a 243 would work better from recoil/hunting perspective

    4.) 22-250 fast twist would be great for predator, paper, and deer

    5.) Reloading offers you great versatility. I shoot 308 and 25/06 very comfortably by loading my own. 150gr @ 2600 fps and a 100 gr. at 3000 fps respectively.
     
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  21. Mr. Hill

    Mr. Hill Member

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    Add a limbsaver and try again. Try it off the bench. If it’s still too much, sell it or trade for a smaller caliber.
     
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  22. Random 8

    Random 8 Member

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    upload_2018-12-18_20-9-51.png
    Here is the difference stock fit can make. In addition to the ample recoil pad added and the aprox. 1" shorter LOP, note the difference in lines. The "pretty" stock places the shooter's shoulder more in line with the center of the bore, and less drop at the heel reduces the unpleasant upward jolt many of us receive from a factory stock. The "hook" at the wrist places the support hand and arm in a more comfortable position with a more open grip, leading to a more natural hold and fit into the pocket of the shoulder. The wide rollover comb provides a consistent cheek weld and takes away any unpleasant slap. These features also lend themselves to accurate shooting from field positions, especially unsupported sitting and offhand.

    Both of these stocks were on my wife's M11 Savage .308, and let me tell you it makes light years of difference in terms of felt recoil and general shooting comfort and accuracy where it counts...away from the bench, in the woods. And she likes the pretty wood.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
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  23. mshootnit

    mshootnit Member

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    I had a Remington Classic 7-08 that hammered/gouged my collarbone every shot off a bench. And I have had a PTR91 in 308 where recoil can only be described as violent. I don't scoff when someone says a 270 is too much for them. I have a ruger 270, and a different 270 WSM that I can handle. I rather enjoy seeing my hits through the scope and gentle pop of my 6mm.
     
  24. tom unler

    tom unler Member

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    That’s funny.... this one rifle just doesn’t satisfy me. I have the option to sell/trade/rebarrel. It’s not my only rifle, (over 70, Remington 700, 11). I reload/shoot in 37 different calibers, up to .458Win.

    Is a .458Win considered High Power?
     
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  25. Goosey

    Goosey Member

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    On some forums "across the pond", I noticed it seems the .270 over there has a bit of reputation for kicking harder than people like. Here it seems to be the opposite. Might be due to the rifles that used to be sold over there.
     
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