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Rem 700 upgrade

Discussion in 'Long Gun Accessories and Optics' started by bob97, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. bob97

    bob97 Member

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    Longtime lurker.

    My dilemma is based on a 700 in 30-06 my grandfather gave me about 25 years ago.

    My problem is i dont shoot it because (a) its not threaded for a supressor and (b) the scope is a little basic (burris fullfield ii 3-9) for me - just a basic crosshair.

    The barrel is a sporter profile so too thin to thread. Its a synthetic stock. Shoots great and i am unlikely to beed more power or range for anything i will ever hunt. My wish is for this gun to become my first choice for hunting.

    The dilemma is that if i upgraded it to something i would really shoot more frequently that would probably be close to what it costs for a new rifle. New barrel would mean either modifying or replacing the stock to clear, new scope or at least rob a scope from another rifle that would eventually get replaced, and possibly a new supressor - my sdn6 really isnt rated for 30-06.

    If i just buy a 6.5 creedmoor and a new scope im probably close to same cost and my sdn6 is fine for that.

    I live and hunt in texas FWIW. I am not a very serios hunter but i have acces to a great range, and i do like range shooting very much.

    Just looking for thoughts or ideas on how to get the most out of this rifle. Looking at it in the safe getting dusty aint it. It will never be a collector item. Its just a good rifle with an emotional connection.
     
  2. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    If you want a custom rifle, then starting with a factory Remington 700 - ASSUMING YOU DO NOT SPEND MONEY BLUEPRINTING - is often a cheaper than going full custom.

    If you want an inexpensive rifle, then you do not want a custom rifle.

    If you want a rifle which will pay you back what you spent to buy it, then you do not want a custom rifle.

    If you are interested in a lower cost, gunsmith free custom rifle, then I suggest you look into a Criterion Remage Nut and compatible barrel and a Timney 510 trigger. You’ll have to either replace your stock, or inlet it for the new barrel profile. Shilen also produces short chambered or long tenon barrels which minimize your costs at the gunsmith as well. Many barrel makers offer this service. Some barrel makers will do the install for you as well, if you send the action.

    Plan on at least $500, probably safer $700 for a contoured blank, plus thread, chamber, install, crown, and muzzle thread. I’m $600 each into 3 barrels right now, $300 for specially priced contoured blanks from Bartlein, plus $300 each at the smith.
     
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  3. z7

    z7 Member

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    If you want to preserve the heirloom value to that rifle, get a new scope and look into a new stock, and shoot the crap out of it. Learn how to shoot that gun well and be proud of it

    After a few hundred or even thousand rounds, get a new barrel, it’s still your grandfathers rifle, but now it is closer to what you want

    If you just want a new rifle and do not care about that rifle, then figure out what you want and get it

    You will make more money, and some things, like a good rifle, are worth it
     
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  4. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

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    If you hand load the cheapest option might be to cut the barrel back a bit, have it threaded, and load the 06 down.

    VTs suggestions for modifications are excellent, and honestly probably the most cost effective options your likely to get.
    ERShaw is probably the cheapest options and for just the barrel and threading your looking at about 300-320 unfinished (400 in stainless), then installation would be another 100-125 unless you do it yourself.

    Im going back and forth over changing a 700 to another caliber right now, and your correct cost is much higher than just buying a rifle off the shelf.
    But i LIKE my rifle, its the last of the guns i bought with my first job, so ill probably eat another 500 dollars, after the last 500 dollars, on a rifle i bought for 300 dollars.
    Tho not for a while.....
     
  5. z7

    z7 Member

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    I spent $5k on a 308 two years ago. It was REALLY EXPENSIVE! For me and my family. We budgeted and saved up for about a year and my wife agreed to the purchase. The level of confidence and joy I get from that rifle, that shoots so well, is worth it. Every time i shoot that rifle it makes me smile, so I always encourage others to really consider doing a custom/semi custom rifle.

    Replacement barrels, while expensive compared to a ruger American rifle, are so good it is worth it
     
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  6. otisrush

    otisrush Member

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    If I'm understanding your dilemma I think it's somewhat similar to the situation I was in.

    I have an old Rem 700 in .270. It literally was under the Christmas tree on Christmas morning when I was 14 yrs old. (I'm now 57.) It has huge amounts of sentimental value. I take it out a couple of times per year and kind of do some ceremonial shots. My goal in shooting it is to reminisce. (I don't hunt any more.) It has an old Bushnell 3-9x scope on it. It'll consistently knock steel plates out to 500 yards.

    About 1.5 yrs ago I decided to get into some longer-ish range target rifle shooting. The .243 seemed like the right caliber. So I bought a new Rem 700 varmint model (bull barrel) in .243. I put on a nice (for me) Vortex scope on a 20 MOA rail. New Timney Calvin Elite trigger. And a Bell & Carlson fiberglass stock. I load my own ammo for it and it shoots like a dream. When I decided to go down this route I didn't even consider that .270 being my target gun. It didn't seem like a good fit on numerous levels.

    Two totally different needs (hunting if I were a hunter; reminiscing) and somewhat-precision target shooting. Therefore, two different guns.

    I think it's tough to turn a hunting gun into a target gun, and vice versa. If your 700 has a lot of sentimental value I'd leave it the way it is and enjoy it. If you want to get into target shooting I'd add to the stable of guns, even if it meant doing things deliberately financially over time to enable you to get what you really want. (And, as you mentioned 6.5CM, if you do want to do some target shooting, I would say there are some better options than the .30-06.)
     
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  7. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    I'd keep it and buy something you like better. What you have is a very basic, but very capable, hunting rifle as is. The Burris scope is my 1st pick for anyone wanting a scope without spending $400. It sounds like you are less a hunter, and more of a shooter and something else truly would suit your needs better.

    If it were mine, and I actually have the same basic rifle, I'd eventually upgrade the stock and scope to something nicer. But that can be down the road, get a rifle you like now. In my case I bought my rifle new in 1975. I rarely use it anymore, but it isn't for sale. Mine is sitting in a McMillan stock that I picked up used at a good price and has a Leupold scope on it.

    Sounds like something like this in 6.5 CM or 308 would suit your needs:

    http://www.tikka.fi/en-us/rifles/tikka-t3x/t3x-compact-tactical-rifle

    Street prices are about $900 in blue, $1000 in SS.

    6.5 CM would be my pick. They offer that cartridge in 20" and 24" barrels. Out to well past 1000 yards the 20" barrel is more than enough. If you want to start shooting closer to 2000 you need the 24" barrel
     
  8. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    I can’t help but point out the contradiction inherent to the advice for this kind of thread:

    “I have a hunting rifle Gpa gave me, I don’t hunt, but love to shoot, and I want to make use of his rifle.”

    Common responses:
    “Keep that hunting rifle, because you’ll need it for hunting. Buy something else.”

    While it IS cheaper to buy some other FACTORY rifle, it’s not cheaper to build a different custom rifle, and doing so will ensure you don’t build any of your own memories with Gpa’s old hunting rifle, which will sit in the back of the closet and collect dust.

    In my experience, it’s actually VERY EASY to turn a Remington 700 from a hunting rifle into a target rifle and back again. It’s EXPENSIVE, but any custom is expensive. Replace the stock and barrel. If you blueprint the action, have the gunsmith setback the original barrel so it still headspaces - adds about $200. At that point, you have two barrels and two stocks, and it’d take about an hour to change back and forth, plus a few shots to rezero.

    You can also build a hybrid design which is more stable for target shooting, but not too heavy to be hunted. I like a McMillan A3 type stock on any rifle I touch, for example, whether I’m shooting from a bench or a deerstand. A medium or light Palma barrel will ride very flat on a front rest, but still yield an overall rifle weight somewhere around 11-12.5lbs. Right on the edge of tolerable for hunting, but reasonable for stand hunting, but very stable on the bench. A guy could go a few contours lighter even, or cut 2” off of the muzzle end to drop weight from there (that’s planning a 26” barrel).

    If it were mine, I’d keep the factory barrel and stock, screw on a Criteron Remage barrel in 284win, 6.5-284, 6.5-06, or 280, drop it into a McMillan Adjustable cheek Game Warden stock, and go punch tiny groups in paper. No gunsmith fees, relatively low costs, and everything is reversible in under an hour.
     
  9. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    What kind of “emotional connection”?

    Did you know your Grandfather well enough to know what he would have wanted you to do with it?
     
  10. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    This grandfather (me) does not like his firearms messed with. Dead or alive. :D
     
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  11. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    Most I would change is the scope - that is, since you don't like the scope.
     
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  12. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    Echoing jmr40 that’s a very usable scope.
     
  13. SamT1

    SamT1 Member

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    The 30-06 makes a good mid long range shooter. I’d put it in a stock like a magpul hunter. Trigger, thread it for 1/2-28 and adapt it up or Use one of the non direct thread suppressors. (I’d chop it shorter if it was me down to 20) scope of your choice.

    If it’s currently a safe queen and your attached I wouldn’t hesitate to make it your own.
     
  14. Sniper66

    Sniper66 Member

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    I think post#6 gives the best advice. Leave the inherited rifle as is and look to buy rifle(s) you really want. I inherited an Iver Johnson 410 from my father. It has tremendous sentimental value so it hangs in my den attached to an old barn board with an inscription dedicated to the memory. Across the room is my gun cabinet that is overflowing with really great rifles and shotguns I've accumulated over the past 50 years. The 410 is still my favorite.
     
  15. bob97

    bob97 Member

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    Location:
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    thanks for all the replies and good ideas.

    I think I am just going to shoot it for now as is. I do have an older vortex viper on a gun that is currently disassembled, so I am considering putting that one on. Trigger seems like a good idea as well so maybe do that sooner than later. I may play with it more towards hunting season.

    regarding threading to 1/2" - the gunsmith I used before did say threading to 1/2" was an option. is that safe? keeping in mind its a 22" barrel.
     
  16. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

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    If i remember correctly @MachIVshooter has said that hes used 1/2-28 and adapters upto 300wm? hopefully he'll come on and correct me if im wrong.
     
  17. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    Yes, 1/2-28 is fine up to .30 cal magnums. Do it all the time.

    If one is going to be putting a ton of rounds down range, the hoop stress causing the muzzle to bell a bit over time is a concern, but then, someone who will be firing thousands of rounds at paper targets isn't likely to be doing so from a skinny sporter barrel anyway.

    As a general rule, your barrel OD at point of threading needs to be .080" larger than thread major diameter to ensure axial suppressor alignment. If it's under that, you need a shoulder. If your barrel measures at least .640", making a shoulder for the suppressor to run 5/8-24 is an option. Need .580" diameter to do 9/16-24 with a shoulder.

    This was a .338 WM with a barrel OD of just .645" I did for a guy. 5/8-24 with a blended shoulder

    IMG_2298.JPG
     
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